Emmanuelle Caplette is Getting Even Better

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
Oddly enough, I play about half the time on a cocktail set, where I use no foot hihat at all and I alternate bass drum between the right and left foot to avoid fatigue. What's curious is that in threads about cocktail drum set playing, people often say the main drawback is that they can't keep their left foot going! When they have a hihat pedal, they neglect it and when they don't have one, they want it. Go figure.

The difference between a crutch and a musical instrument should be obvious. The hats are a musical instrument and are available for anyone to use provided they have the skill, judgment and coordination to actively employ them in playing. I know I do. One of the things that makes an intricate groove is the sound of the hats going in the background keeping time or playing some counter beat. Even if the hats aren't heard, their influence is felt, much like a ghost note on the snare or bass drum. Again, one has to have the skill to pull this off.

Whether or not she could have "easily" added in her left foot is something neither one of us will ever know. True, she is a better drummer than me, maybe you too as you state, but if someone puts something up here to critique, that's what I'm going to do. In my opinion, her disregard of the left foot brought her playing down a notch. Others can disagree and I welcome the discussion.
Was the video put up for a critique? Are all videos meant to be critiqued upon? This is worse than when I was in college ;)
 

Swiss Matthias

Platinum Member
One of the things that makes an intricate groove is the sound of the hats going in the background keeping time or playing some counter beat. Even if the hats aren't heard, their influence is felt, much like a ghost note on the snare or bass drum.
That very much depends on overall volume and the kind of hihats. I often find myself
in situations where the hihats would actually be too loud to have them constantly
going!! They wouldn't be in the background at all.

Red words: This is probably what most of your repliers (including
me) have a problem with: On one hand you're stressing that one has to be good enough of
a player to be able to play with the left foot. On the other hand you're implying that drummers
need their left foot as a time keeper or help. (Thus the word crutch)

Most situations I can think of where amateur and advanced drummers use their left foot to
play the hihat, chances are that their hihat actually destroys their groove are at least
as great as that it enhances it. (Because of placement and coordination issues, in case you're
wondering)

Of course you can build intricate grooves including the left foot hihat, but by no means does the
hihat need to be pedalled most of the time.
 

Anon La Ply

Renegade
I'm a fan of LF action in grooves too and agree with DMC's point about the ghost note effect. I'm a very simple LF player so that effectively means that when I'm playing the ride the HHs add a tad more accent on the 2 and 4 or the 1 and 3. It's like a little shaker and I enjoy the extra flavour.

Also agree that in low volume situations the "chick" can be dominant. Of course it's better to leave out the HH than to play it sloppily, and that not all grooves are enhanced by HH accents, and often in rock the difference is so slight that it's no biggie.

Personally, I saw no deficiency in that area by EC. She has the skill so any omissions would most likely be musical choices.
 

Deathmetalconga

Platinum Member
Was the video put up for a critique? Are all videos meant to be critiqued upon? This is worse than when I was in college ;)
I think it was put up for a enjoyment, education and discussion, like all videos here. Critiquing, in a polite and considered way, certainly fits into that.
 

Deathmetalconga

Platinum Member
That very much depends on overall volume and the kind of hihats. I often find myself
in situations where the hihats would actually be too loud to have them constantly
going!! They wouldn't be in the background at all.

Red words: This is probably what most of your repliers (including
me) have a problem with: On one hand you're stressing that one has to be good enough of
a player to be able to play with the left foot. On the other hand you're implying that drummers
need their left foot as a time keeper or help. (Thus the word crutch)

Most situations I can think of where amateur and advanced drummers use their left foot to
play the hihat, chances are that their hihat actually destroys their groove are at least
as great as that it enhances it. (Because of placement and coordination issues, in case you're
wondering)

Of course you can build intricate grooves including the left foot hihat, but by no means does the
hihat need to be pedalled most of the time.
I view all limbs as equal value. Do the snare, bass or ride need to be played all the time? Depends. Calling the use of the left foot for timekeeping a "crutch" is like the old "That's cheating!" argument. The fact is, timekeeping is central to what drummers do - if we only did one thing, it would be to keep time and play a simple, deep-pocket groove. So if a drummer wants to use their left foot to keep time, audibly or inaudibly, then it's understandable why.

As far as the constant hihat destroying the groove: The ride, snare, toms or bass drum can destroy a groove just as well, depending on the skill and judgment used to play them. If you can't hold it together on any particular limb, then it's time woodshed or accept the lack of discipline and drop the limb from that passage. These are my views only, which sometimes incite riots around here.

As I've said before, the left foot is the drum set of the drum set. It does for the drum set what the drum set does for the rest of the band. A drummer without their left foot going is like a band without a drummer. Which is OK if you're into that kind of thing.
 

Deathmetalconga

Platinum Member
I'm a fan of LF action in grooves too and agree with DMC's point about the ghost note effect. I'm a very simple LF player so that effectively means that when I'm playing the ride the HHs add a tad more accent on the 2 and 4 or the 1 and 3. It's like a little shaker and I enjoy the extra flavour.

Also agree that in low volume situations the "chick" can be dominant. Of course it's better to leave out the HH than to play it sloppily, and that not all grooves are enhanced by HH accents, and often in rock the difference is so slight that it's no biggie.

Personally, I saw no deficiency in that area by EC. She has the skill so any omissions would most likely be musical choices.
Funny you should mention the shaker thing. I sometimes put a Hat Trick jingler on the pull rod and I'd love to try out a mountable shaker. The left foot can do so much more that just the chick-chick thing. It's a whole universe wiating to be discovered.
 

Anon La Ply

Renegade
As far as the constant hihat destroying the groove: The ride, snare, toms or bass drum can destroy a groove just as well, depending on the skill and judgment used to play them.
I've been thinking about how at times I'm playing bass drum at times when I could leave it out - like I'm always proving to myself that I can do it (or something).

But limbs can definitely be used as a crutch. Take away my RH and I'm in Scaryland .. I often prefer to be a bit naff by ticking away than to risk the groove (we can't all be Brian Blade). When I'm feeling daring I'll risk some spaces.
 

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
I think it was put up for a enjoyment, education and discussion, like all videos here. Critiquing, in a polite and considered way, certainly fits into that.
I'm cool with it. But I rather enjoy alot of the stuff I see online, and I've been really good at just leaving it at that. Enjoyment. If someone asked me for my opinion I'm sure I'd jump right in and give my twisted opinion, but I've found that not giving an opinion sometimes carries more weight (if we're gonna talk about the merits of giving or not giving an opinion).
 
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