Emmanuelle Caplette is Getting Even Better

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
I think it was put up for a enjoyment, education and discussion, like all videos here. Critiquing, in a polite and considered way, certainly fits into that.
I'm cool with it. But I rather enjoy alot of the stuff I see online, and I've been really good at just leaving it at that. Enjoyment. If someone asked me for my opinion I'm sure I'd jump right in and give my twisted opinion, but I've found that not giving an opinion sometimes carries more weight (if we're gonna talk about the merits of giving or not giving an opinion).
 

Anon La Ply

Renegade
As far as the constant hihat destroying the groove: The ride, snare, toms or bass drum can destroy a groove just as well, depending on the skill and judgment used to play them.
I've been thinking about how at times I'm playing bass drum at times when I could leave it out - like I'm always proving to myself that I can do it (or something).

But limbs can definitely be used as a crutch. Take away my RH and I'm in Scaryland .. I often prefer to be a bit naff by ticking away than to risk the groove (we can't all be Brian Blade). When I'm feeling daring I'll risk some spaces.
 

Deathmetalconga

Platinum Member
I'm a fan of LF action in grooves too and agree with DMC's point about the ghost note effect. I'm a very simple LF player so that effectively means that when I'm playing the ride the HHs add a tad more accent on the 2 and 4 or the 1 and 3. It's like a little shaker and I enjoy the extra flavour.

Also agree that in low volume situations the "chick" can be dominant. Of course it's better to leave out the HH than to play it sloppily, and that not all grooves are enhanced by HH accents, and often in rock the difference is so slight that it's no biggie.

Personally, I saw no deficiency in that area by EC. She has the skill so any omissions would most likely be musical choices.
Funny you should mention the shaker thing. I sometimes put a Hat Trick jingler on the pull rod and I'd love to try out a mountable shaker. The left foot can do so much more that just the chick-chick thing. It's a whole universe wiating to be discovered.
 

Deathmetalconga

Platinum Member
That very much depends on overall volume and the kind of hihats. I often find myself
in situations where the hihats would actually be too loud to have them constantly
going!! They wouldn't be in the background at all.

Red words: This is probably what most of your repliers (including
me) have a problem with: On one hand you're stressing that one has to be good enough of
a player to be able to play with the left foot. On the other hand you're implying that drummers
need their left foot as a time keeper or help. (Thus the word crutch)

Most situations I can think of where amateur and advanced drummers use their left foot to
play the hihat, chances are that their hihat actually destroys their groove are at least
as great as that it enhances it. (Because of placement and coordination issues, in case you're
wondering)

Of course you can build intricate grooves including the left foot hihat, but by no means does the
hihat need to be pedalled most of the time.
I view all limbs as equal value. Do the snare, bass or ride need to be played all the time? Depends. Calling the use of the left foot for timekeeping a "crutch" is like the old "That's cheating!" argument. The fact is, timekeeping is central to what drummers do - if we only did one thing, it would be to keep time and play a simple, deep-pocket groove. So if a drummer wants to use their left foot to keep time, audibly or inaudibly, then it's understandable why.

As far as the constant hihat destroying the groove: The ride, snare, toms or bass drum can destroy a groove just as well, depending on the skill and judgment used to play them. If you can't hold it together on any particular limb, then it's time woodshed or accept the lack of discipline and drop the limb from that passage. These are my views only, which sometimes incite riots around here.

As I've said before, the left foot is the drum set of the drum set. It does for the drum set what the drum set does for the rest of the band. A drummer without their left foot going is like a band without a drummer. Which is OK if you're into that kind of thing.
 

Deathmetalconga

Platinum Member
Was the video put up for a critique? Are all videos meant to be critiqued upon? This is worse than when I was in college ;)
I think it was put up for a enjoyment, education and discussion, like all videos here. Critiquing, in a polite and considered way, certainly fits into that.
 

Anon La Ply

Renegade
I'm a fan of LF action in grooves too and agree with DMC's point about the ghost note effect. I'm a very simple LF player so that effectively means that when I'm playing the ride the HHs add a tad more accent on the 2 and 4 or the 1 and 3. It's like a little shaker and I enjoy the extra flavour.

Also agree that in low volume situations the "chick" can be dominant. Of course it's better to leave out the HH than to play it sloppily, and that not all grooves are enhanced by HH accents, and often in rock the difference is so slight that it's no biggie.

Personally, I saw no deficiency in that area by EC. She has the skill so any omissions would most likely be musical choices.
 

Swiss Matthias

Platinum Member
One of the things that makes an intricate groove is the sound of the hats going in the background keeping time or playing some counter beat. Even if the hats aren't heard, their influence is felt, much like a ghost note on the snare or bass drum.
That very much depends on overall volume and the kind of hihats. I often find myself
in situations where the hihats would actually be too loud to have them constantly
going!! They wouldn't be in the background at all.

Red words: This is probably what most of your repliers (including
me) have a problem with: On one hand you're stressing that one has to be good enough of
a player to be able to play with the left foot. On the other hand you're implying that drummers
need their left foot as a time keeper or help. (Thus the word crutch)

Most situations I can think of where amateur and advanced drummers use their left foot to
play the hihat, chances are that their hihat actually destroys their groove are at least
as great as that it enhances it. (Because of placement and coordination issues, in case you're
wondering)

Of course you can build intricate grooves including the left foot hihat, but by no means does the
hihat need to be pedalled most of the time.
 

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
Oddly enough, I play about half the time on a cocktail set, where I use no foot hihat at all and I alternate bass drum between the right and left foot to avoid fatigue. What's curious is that in threads about cocktail drum set playing, people often say the main drawback is that they can't keep their left foot going! When they have a hihat pedal, they neglect it and when they don't have one, they want it. Go figure.

The difference between a crutch and a musical instrument should be obvious. The hats are a musical instrument and are available for anyone to use provided they have the skill, judgment and coordination to actively employ them in playing. I know I do. One of the things that makes an intricate groove is the sound of the hats going in the background keeping time or playing some counter beat. Even if the hats aren't heard, their influence is felt, much like a ghost note on the snare or bass drum. Again, one has to have the skill to pull this off.

Whether or not she could have "easily" added in her left foot is something neither one of us will ever know. True, she is a better drummer than me, maybe you too as you state, but if someone puts something up here to critique, that's what I'm going to do. In my opinion, her disregard of the left foot brought her playing down a notch. Others can disagree and I welcome the discussion.
Was the video put up for a critique? Are all videos meant to be critiqued upon? This is worse than when I was in college ;)
 

Deathmetalconga

Platinum Member
I don't have time to respond to all the stuff about my comment but to me, I always want to mean what I play. I never play any part of the kit just because, and I never have my hats going constantly unless that's the sound I want in the groove. I don't believe in making one limb a time-crutch because I work hard to make my time come from within me and the music as a whole. The pulse runs through my head/body, and I don't need it to run through my hats unless I want the audience to hear it that way.

Make assumptions about my playing if you like, but I have quite a bit of control and could relatively easily just run most subdivisions over a whole song if I wanted to, but it really does annoy the crap out of me a lot of the time. I never leave it out for say, Jazz where it really makes the song sound better to have hat chicks in it. Insinuating that I'm somehow playing "3 limb drums" simply because I'm not afraid to leave out a sound that doesn't fit is silly. Nearly all the music I listen to on records even if the hats are going for the whole song, they cut it out in post, or bury it under the other sounds. I think this is because it sounds dumb a lot of the time to have a constant sound under a potentially intricate groove.

In my opinion, if this lady wanted to have hat chicks in the song, she also could have easily done so. She looks to be a better drummer than either you or I, and I'm not going to make comments unless something she did detracted from the song.
Oddly enough, I play about half the time on a cocktail set, where I use no foot hihat at all and I alternate bass drum between the right and left foot to avoid fatigue. What's curious is that in threads about cocktail drum set playing, people often say the main drawback is that they can't keep their left foot going! When they have a hihat pedal, they neglect it and when they don't have one, they want it. Go figure.

The difference between a crutch and a musical instrument should be obvious. The hats are a musical instrument and are available for anyone to use provided they have the skill, judgment and coordination to actively employ them in playing. I know I do. One of the things that makes an intricate groove is the sound of the hats going in the background keeping time or playing some counter beat. Even if the hats aren't heard, their influence is felt, much like a ghost note on the snare or bass drum. Again, one has to have the skill to pull this off.

Whether or not she could have "easily" added in her left foot is something neither one of us will ever know. True, she is a better drummer than me, maybe you too as you state, but if someone puts something up here to critique, that's what I'm going to do. In my opinion, her disregard of the left foot brought her playing down a notch. Others can disagree and I welcome the discussion.
 

GruntersDad

Administrator - Mayor
Some History

In 2003 she was chosen to represent Drummondville college in a rising star contest at the Montreal Drumfest. Following her college diploma she decided to continue her studies at the University of Montreal in pop/jazz interpretation with Paul Brochu. At the end of her first year at the University Emmanuelle was hired by the troop Cavalia (For American Tour 2005-2006) which was composed by Michel Cusson.





The big adventure started for Emmanuelle in 2007 with the realization of her objectives, she got the opportunity to play drums on television and go on different tours, she participated two years in a row at the "Gala des Jutras", she also played drums at Quebec's National Day ( St-Jean-baptiste ) The host was Normand Brathwaite. The same year she went on tour with IMA (Smile) and Marilou ( Tout simplement).





Since 2008, Emmanuelle was hired to play in a new children television show with Annie Brocoli "The Broco Show" on Radio Canada (CBC French). Her participation brought her to meet extraordinary people like Quebec's producer Guy Tourville, he gave her the chance of a lifetime to record her two first single on the radio. She then recorded the entire album of the Broco show.





Emmanuelle is currently on tour "A La Vida" with Ima. You can see her in the second season of Broco Show with Annie Brocoli on Radio-Canada.
 

AirborneSFC

Gold Member
She just said she is getting a new custom Sonor kit. I think its an SQ2 but she has not said. I like her teaching methods from the clinics I have seen.
 

Dr_Watso

Platinum Member
Well said Doc, but most of the time, we play with all 4 limbs, the foot on the hi-hat doesn't have to be an "obvious" chick sound, or playing quarter or 8th notes solely with the foot, we use our foot a lot to make the hi-hat sounds good while played with our hands, by applying different pressure with the foot on the hi-hat pedal to create a feel and add texture and colors into our grooves, so even if it doesn't look like we're doing something with our foot from an audience POV, we certainely are using all 4 limbs when we play, even if it's just to keep a tight, crisp sound from the hi-hat.
This is exactly my point. The hats are so so much more than a time crutch for the drummer or band. The less we use them as a pulse, and feel that internally instead, the more free our left foot is to actually express sounds in the music that make an impact on the song. Making it some personal point to always be busier on your hi hats just because you can is detrimental to playing musically in my opinion.

As a side note, I'm generally not shy about using my left heel on the back of the pedal where it won't make noise for those occasions when I want to tie my time for a difficult passage or something. I just hate the constant sound, and it's something I think about in my playing. I believe the more aspects of our playing we examine in this manner, the better the overall drummer we make. It's all subtle stuff, and the average listener wouldn't have a clue if you were on the hat chicks all night or not, even so, people can instinctively tell when someone is putting a lot of thought and finesse into their work, they might not fully know why, but they know they like it.
 

Mad About Drums

Pollyanna's Agent
Insinuating that I'm somehow playing "3 limb drums" simply because I'm not afraid to leave out a sound that doesn't fit is silly. Nearly all the music I listen to on records even if the hats are going for the whole song, they cut it out in post, or bury it under the other sounds. I think this is because it sounds dumb a lot of the time to have a constant sound under a potentially intricate groove.
Well said Doc, but most of the time, we play with all 4 limbs, the foot on the hi-hat doesn't have to be an "obvious" chick sound, or playing quarter or 8th notes solely with the foot, we use our foot a lot to make the hi-hat sounds good while played with our hands, by applying different pressure with the foot on the hi-hat pedal to create a feel and add texture and colors into our grooves, so even if it doesn't look like we're doing something with our foot from an audience POV, we certainely are using all 4 limbs when we play, even if it's just to keep a tight, crisp sound from the hi-hat.
 

Dr_Watso

Platinum Member
If you're not going to use your left foot, you might as well be playing a cocktail set.

Sounds like you need to take in more knowledge about the use of the left foot. It can be going heel-up or heel-down and can add to the music by playing straight time, something in 3 over everything else in 4, or a clave beat. I'm curious if you have such a limited view of the potential of the other three limbs!
I don't have time to respond to all the stuff about my comment but to me, I always want to mean what I play. I never play any part of the kit just because, and I never have my hats going constantly unless that's the sound I want in the groove. I don't believe in making one limb a time-crutch because I work hard to make my time come from within me and the music as a whole. The pulse runs through my head/body, and I don't need it to run through my hats unless I want the audience to hear it that way.

Make assumptions about my playing if you like, but I have quite a bit of control and could relatively easily just run most subdivisions over a whole song if I wanted to, but it really does annoy the crap out of me a lot of the time. I never leave it out for say, Jazz where it really makes the song sound better to have hat chicks in it. Insinuating that I'm somehow playing "3 limb drums" simply because I'm not afraid to leave out a sound that doesn't fit is silly. Nearly all the music I listen to on records even if the hats are going for the whole song, they cut it out in post, or bury it under the other sounds. I think this is because it sounds dumb a lot of the time to have a constant sound under a potentially intricate groove.

In my opinion, if this lady wanted to have hat chicks in the song, she also could have easily done so. She looks to be a better drummer than either you or I, and I'm not going to make comments unless something she did detracted from the song.
 

Pocket-full-of-gold

Platinum Member
Only Jenns Hannemann is world class.
Yep. Her paradiddleladaloodles completely suck. And as for her flam rests.....man, don't get me started.....I've never heard such amateurish flam rests!

She needs 17 toms before she's even in the same league as Jens......not even Terri Lyne can cut it without 'em.
 

Anon La Ply

Renegade
Can we just leave it at "She's a great player and I wish her all the luck in the world"?

... I tend to think if more of us were positive about each other, it might've been different
Fair point, Bo, but that would make for a short, rather bland discussion.


I view the left foot as being as equal a contributor to the drum set as the right hand, left hand and right foot. If you view things from that perspective, it would be as odd to leave the left foot out of a song as it would be the snare drum or bass drum. Yeah, that happens - but not very much.
In jazz, yes. The LF (on hats) has so much less dynamic range than other limbs that it truly is less important than other limbs in hard rock. Matthias put it nicely ...

You shouldn't base your decision to play anything with the left foot on the fact that you want to include all four limbs. It should be a matter of sound. In jazz it's fundamental, in styles like pop it's really not.
 

Swiss Matthias

Platinum Member
Good player, has a decent sound. My only criticism is her technique lacks a general level of control as a drummer like say Terri Lyne Carrington.
Do you really compare her technique to Terri Lyne's just because they're both women??
Or do you really think they're that similar in their approach?
 

Swiss Matthias

Platinum Member
You sound better, even in loud situations, and more importantly you are tighter.
Actually in my experience often the opposite is the case! It's harder to keep it all
together, to have ride, snare, bassdrums and hihat all lining up together! And if
they aren't, the groove is destroyed.

Lately I am actually playing less hihat with foot when I play pop/rock grooves with
my ride, because in my ears playing LH quarters started to sound beginner-ish. I
don't know really why.

LH offs (on all the "+"s) sound a lot better to me, but I avoid overusing it.
 
Top