Electronic music/IDM

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vorsybl

Guest
Anybody listen to these types of genres? Is there any real demand for actual drummers to play this type of music or is rock music still the most salient market in contemporary music scene? IDM is intelligent dance music lol, it's good though.

Usually these grooves have minimal subdivisions like in metal music and are more groove based. Mostly hi hat bass and snare with some toms and cymbals throw in, real simple, real slow, but real good.

This is actually the type of music that got me interested in drum grooves actually...
 
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Adam B

Senior Member
I grew up on Aphex Twin, Squarepusher, Autechre, ect, and continue to listen to any other artists that peek my interest. I love the genre. It takes rhythm to entirely new levels.

As far as demand for drummers? Probably not. In the realm of electronic music, everything you need to make it is right in your computer.

Unless, however, you're talking about a live setting. In that case it adds loads to the performance. Watching some one tweak mixers and boxes behind a laptop is really boring. Add some live instruments to it and you've got something to see, ie Squarepusher. The man is a monster on the bass guitar.
 
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vorsybl

Guest
I grew up on Aphex Twin, Squarepusher, Autechre, ect, and continue to listen to any other artists that peek my interest. I love the genre. It takes rhythm to entirely new levels.

As far as demand for drummers? Probably not. In the realm of electronic music, everything you need to make it is right in your computer.

Unless, however, you're talking about a live setting. In that case it adds loads to the performance. Watching some one tweak mixers and boxes behind a laptop is really boring. Add some live instruments to it and you've got something to see, ie Squarepusher. The man is a monster on the bass guitar.
That's what I"m saying dude, I feel like if you get a guy behind a computer to do the synth stuff while an actual drummer plays the beat live, people would groove just as hard as they would at a club or something with the guy behind the computer doing all the work.

Damn the first vid is sick.
 
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vorsybl

Guest
Damn he's pretty sick, definitely has an ear for the sound.

So let's talk a little about some similarities between what these guys you've shown me in terms of what they're playing. Obviously the notes aren't exactly the same, sometimes they are, but it's the general feel of the groove and I'm curious what others think comprises that feel.

In my opinion it's the high tempo it's played at. I also usually hear eighth notes on the hi hat/ride usually, that's usually what I do when I Play it because in actual DNB music it's usually eighth notes, sometimes it's 16ths though in squarepusher songs. The accents usually seem like they're in the same place as well.

I was watching a video me and two other did and I attempted to play some beats similar to this while the other guy used a synth for the DNB electronic trips and another on the piano. Even though it could use work in terms of precision, there were things I was doing in different parts that lasted about a second or so that differs from some of these videos you've been showing me. Sadly I'm not sure what note placements they were, I probably just replicated sounds that I've heard in the past when I used to listen to DNB a lot more than I do now, when I was in my teens. Like Bassdrive on itunes radio lol
 
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mediocrefunkybeat

Guest
I'm going to play my card.

I don't think that the latest forms of electronic music necessarily lend themselves to acoustic drums. I don't think that most forms of modern electronica lend themselves to human percussion playing. This is on several fronts: -

i) Physical impossibility. There are times (including in Autechre's last two albums) that physically playing the parts is impossible because of the number of parts they are composed in. When you have seven separate and simultaneous percussion sounds being played, a single human player isn't able to play it. Regardless of their ability. Of course, it's possible with more than one percussionist, but that ramps the difficulty of getting the sync right even higher.

ii) The sounds. So many of the sounds being used are inherently non-acoustic and are instead, acousmatic. If you want to replicate these sounds accurately, you need a laptop. No ifs, no buts.

iii) Genre aesthetic. With notable exceptions, electronic music is inherently just that - electronic. Take something like Glitch (a pet topic of mine) that requires the use of computer mistakes and errors as the basis of the sound material - especially rhythmically.

Let me put it this way. If you were playing Beethoven Piano music, could you replicate the sound, feel and aesthetic using a modern drum kit? Absolutely not and you'd be laughed at for even trying it.

Now, with IDM and other electronic forms there are times when acoustic drummers could be used but personally, I don't see the point in forcing it to fit. Computers are computers - why try and play like one? They do things that a human can't do and humans do things that computers can't do.

I'm all for 'electroacoustic' merging toward new electronic forms - but I don't think the attitude of most drummers is right for this. Instead of actually trying something new, we tend to try and shoehorn what we already know in. Lose that prejudice and there might be some new ground to be broken using acoustic instruments.
 
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vorsybl

Guest
I see what you're saying, yeah a guitarist said some similar stuff about how there are certain parts that can't be played by one person on the drumset no matter how good they are. Well it's not that ostensible is it? I mean, yeah, excluding those types of sequences. I"m just saying there's also alot of electronic music that just uses normal beats that don't have those crazy like repeating bass hits or whatever. Like a group called Sound tribe sector 9, thats mostly electronic and the grooves are played by a really proficient human, in fact im gonna listen to some lol

Also, what are some things a human can do that a computer can't in terms of drumset?

I could see where you're going though. But it may be that our definition of electronic music is different. I just know that, I listen to "groove salad" radio station on Itunes a lot, and they play a lot of grooves that I like that are replicable by a human. They are very "human" grooves as well going along with what your'es aying
 
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mediocrefunkybeat

Guest
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GkeSzCjA_RE

This is something that cannot be played by a human due to the nature of the sounds. This is inherently non-human. If we take something like this and up the rhythmic complexity by twenty, you have some idea of where I'm going with this.
 
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mediocrefunkybeat

Guest
Here's a little thing I cooked up last year at University. My specialism is avant-garde electronic music.
 

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vorsybl

Guest
What a coincidence lol, Wow man interesting ideas about music put forth what year are you? My aunt and children live out in the UK...
 
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mediocrefunkybeat

Guest
What a coincidence lol, Wow man interesting ideas about music put forth what year are you? My aunt and children live out in the UK...
Third year, but I wrote that in the middle of my second year. That's one of my better pieces of work.
 

jammypollok

Junior Member
Downtempo (or DownTempo) is a laid-back electronic music style often intended more for listening and socializing than dancing, though some releases are unmistakably produced for the dance floor. Often the names lounge music or chill out are used to refer to songs demonstrative of the genre, but those names also refer to other styles of music, and downtempo encompasses a wider variety of styles than those terms alone would indicate.
 
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