Ears ringing

alparrott

Platinum Member
I have a very slight ringing in my ears. I use earplugs, headphones, or in-ear monitors to protect my hearing. A couple of nights ago I went to a major rock act's concert indoors and the sound was possibly too loud for the venue. It was so loud my sinuses ached, my teeth ached, and the ringing was dazzling. I'm bringing some foam plugs next time.
 

jonescrusher

Pioneer Member
Luckily my flat is on a very busy street with a 24hr bus stop outside so I never actually notice it these days.
! If living on top of constant noise is lucky it says something about the hell of tinnitus. I finally spent big money on moulded plugs so I can stop living in fear of a post-gig ringing turning permanent. It would leave me suicidal.
 

jonescrusher

Pioneer Member
This is my experience to a tee. That's how I deal with it, just accept it, tune it out, don't focus on it. Like there's no way I'm gonna need antidepressants. I fool myself into thinking that my hearing is so good, I'm picking up microwaves, cellphones, radio, TV, CB, military defense radar, GPS signals and every other form of electromagnetism there is ha ha.

But that gun tore me up. Funny thing is...the ringing seems perfectly balanced....the ringing is exactly the same intensity in both ears. Why wouldn't my right ear ring more?
That's unusual. Most cases of tinnitus occur only in one ear, especially if caused by a single noise event like a gun shot. What vengeance was wreaked on the 'friend' who fired the shot?
 

sticksnstonesrus

Silver Member
I can't really play 50+ or greater without feeling like I need ear plugs or my IEM's. After so many years of being blasted by wedges and big PA speakers, I'm glad to have salvaged what I have. Thankfully, I don't really even notice any ringing any more. They say that it can go down (the tinnitus) with time.

Again, ear protection/IEM's are your friends.
 

ANIMALBEATS

Silver Member
Total silence has become somthing that I no longer experience, whist on a hill, or in my bed, I long for nothing more. Somthing so simple and so fundemental has been taken away, I feel cheated.
 

Aeolian

Platinum Member
Larry, as soon as you can, find the Sensaphonics rep nearest you and get in there. The damage is cumulative and will continue to get worse.

Tinitus is when a nerve is damaged to the point that it spontaneously sends a signal, regardless of there being such a frequency in the inner ear. The more nerves damaged, the more frequencies going on. Most folks just get a single tone. But some folks have multiple tones and in bad cases it sounds like rushing wind. Mine is mostly in my right ear because I played guitar 6 nights a week for a year and a half in the same club with a small stage and a crash cymbal around 3 feet from my right ear. I have one dominant tone and a couple of weaker ones. And a couple of weak ones in my left ear.

Sometimes the nerve can recover for the excessive stimulation and the ringing goes away. Most folks experience of going to a loud concert or being around an explosion or gunshot. But over time it adds up and at some point the nerve is too damaged to recover and the tone is permanent.

It is aggravated by stimulants like caffine, stress and high blood pressure.

The reason I said Sensaphonics is that they are a musician oriented business. I had my Kaiser plan audiologist order me up some Westone plugs, but they sounded funny (took the meat right out of the snare drum and I couldn't tell what I was doing with it, impossible to tell ghost notes from med ones), were uncomfortable, and like Drum Enthusiast, they leaked when you sang or otherwise moved your jaw or ears around. The Sensaphonics molds are soft and I can leave them in over a 4 hour gig and forget I have them in. I've even driven home with them in. I actually use them on long drives as it reduces the noise of the car making it easier to hear the radio clearly (as long as nobody else is in the car too as the radio is blasting to unprotected ears).

You may have to drive a bit to get to a Sensaphonics certified audiologist, but it will be someone who won't lecture you about that damn rock and roll, will understand what you are doing, and help you be a better musician. If you sing, or also play some wind instrument, they will make sure the molds are optimized for your jaw going through that range of motions.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
What vengeance was wreaked on the 'friend' who fired the shot?
I didn't even know who the guy was. I was riding shotgun in my own Camaro, a buddy of mine was driving, he picked up this guy I'd never met before. After it happened, I remember yelling a lot, but it didn't get physical, I was unarmed. We were giving him a lift somewhere so he got out soon enough...Looking back I should have taken the gun and shot the bastard...
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
Aoelin thanks for the info, I really appreciate it. I will check them out, I didn't know it could get worse. Or get better. I will take your lead.
 
B

BigSteve

Guest
I've had ringing in both ears as long as I can remember. I grew up around auto racing, super modifieds, sprint cars...nobody ever thought about ear protection. When I played in rock bands earlier in life I never wore ear protection. It's one of those things where I wish I knew then what I know now. The ringing isn't severe, most noticable when it's quiet. But I protect my ears now when I play. I sure don't want it getting any worse!
 

MisterMixelpix

Silver Member
No ringing here. I never enjoyed listening to music that hurt, and after playing drums for about three days with no hearing protection I refused to do so ever again. I either use in-ear buds which offer surprisingly decent protection, or my Hearos Rock-n-Roll plugs.
 

Swiss Matthias

Platinum Member
Practically no ringing here. After having loud music in my headphones (playing drums) some noise in the ears, but it went away everytime so far.
I try to take care as much as I can. I wear ear protection virtually always, even if I play jazz (except for piano trio where it really is quiet, or brush playing). By doing so I try to be as accustomed to protection as I can in order to not playing too loud or something all of a sudden in a rehearsal or gig.
 

Aeolian

Platinum Member
Good point, the ER9.5 filters I usually wear are pretty true sounding, but they do change the tone somewhat. It's good to get used to the sound of the drums and the balance with the rest of the band while wearing them.

I did know one drummer who wore ER25's all the time, and would bash away at rehearsals.
 
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