earliest you can play the drums?

bermuda

Drummerworld Pro Drummer - Administrator
Staff member
Can and should are different questions.

I can play at 7am if I wish - I'm in a house, and my next door neighbors are long gone by then (and the one next to my drum room is also a drummer!) It's probably more a question of the wife not really wanting to hear drums that early.

But how early should one play? I think as early as they want.

Bermuda
 

Fuo

Platinum Member
My self-imposed kit-drumming hours are 11am - 9pm. Neighbors haven't complained yet in 2.5 yrs.
 

Fuo

Platinum Member
Try asking them instead of us then. That may score you some brownie points too, they'll see that you care and are trying to be considerate.
 

Virgual Reality

Junior Member
Having both an acoustic and electric kit could give you more freedom to jam whenever and for however long you choose to. Excessive noise in the dead of night would no longer be problematic by just switching to a set of e-drums and putting on headphones. It's a costly investment though, which sucks cause its costly enough to maintain and upgrade acoustic drums. Drum muting pads work okay on acoustic, but they just absolutely deaden the pure sound.
 

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
These neighbor issues can be solved if you had a bbq once a month and invited them over. Buying people with food has worked for millenia.
 

alparrott

Platinum Member
well she... is not the nicest person and i dont think she would like me playing at all
You'll never know until you ask. Perhaps she will appreciate your forthright, mature approach to keeping peace and being considerate of others.

On the other hand, she may be a toolbag and tell you she'll call the cops if she even hears a pin drop.

I have faced both types of neighbors over the years. Here's the distillation of all my experiences:

1) Know your local laws/codes/ordinances. This should ALWAYS be your starting point. Do they have anything specific to say about when or what types of noise are acceptable? This is especially true if you are renting in an apartment or condo complex, or if you have a neighborhood association or covenant that has specific things to say. Make sure at the very minimum you stay inside all of these rules. That way, there's less likelihood of the neighbor(s) successfully using any type of authority intervention against you.

2) Be proactive and accommodating. Visit your neighbors, find out their routines (maybe they are at work at certain times of the day - game on!) and concerns, and be very clear on what times you would like to play and practice. If you are going to have band practice at your place, You may need to bring it up now. I always leave them a business card with my number on it and say, "I will have my phone next to the drums at all times; if I am playing and you need me to stop, please call me so we can discuss it."

3) Always keep in mind that no matter how good a drummer you may be, to non-drummers our instrument sounds like repetitive, unceasing, irritating noise when it's unaccompanied. Take steps on your side to minimize the impact of your playing in your neighborhood. I personally have a set of mesh heads and practice cymbals I have used in various places I have lived where it was not feasible to play at full volume. Other steps might include an electronic kit or relocating your drums to a dedicated rehearsal space, in extreme circumstances.

4) Pray for musician neighbors.
 

nirvanadrummer

Senior Member
You'll never know until you ask. Perhaps she will appreciate your forthright, mature approach to keeping peace and being considerate of others.

On the other hand, she may be a toolbag and tell you she'll call the cops if she even hears a pin drop.

I have faced both types of neighbors over the years. Here's the distillation of all my experiences:

1) Know your local laws/codes/ordinances. This should ALWAYS be your starting point. Do they have anything specific to say about when or what types of noise are acceptable? This is especially true if you are renting in an apartment or condo complex, or if you have a neighborhood association or covenant that has specific things to say. Make sure at the very minimum you stay inside all of these rules. That way, there's less likelihood of the neighbor(s) successfully using any type of authority intervention against you.

2) Be proactive and accommodating. Visit your neighbors, find out their routines (maybe they are at work at certain times of the day - game on!) and concerns, and be very clear on what times you would like to play and practice. If you are going to have band practice at your place, You may need to bring it up now. I always leave them a business card with my number on it and say, "I will have my phone next to the drums at all times; if I am playing and you need me to stop, please call me so we can discuss it."

3) Always keep in mind that no matter how good a drummer you may be, to non-drummers our instrument sounds like repetitive, unceasing, irritating noise when it's unaccompanied. Take steps on your side to minimize the impact of your playing in your neighborhood. I personally have a set of mesh heads and practice cymbals I have used in various places I have lived where it was not feasible to play at full volume. Other steps might include an electronic kit or relocating your drums to a dedicated rehearsal space, in extreme circumstances.

4) Pray for musician neighbors.
haha shes moving actually so im hoping for atleast nice neighbors
 
A

audiotech

Guest
I'm very lucky, anytime I want, except when I'm driving, it's difficult to get the hi hat stand positioned correctly.

Dennis
 

groove1

Silver Member
Depends where you live and if the sound is going to annoy anybody. Some places have ordinances about loud sound.
 

harryconway

Platinum Member
Depends on your neighborhood. Around my crib, the noise ordinance says no chainsaws, jackhammers, etc. before 7am. Personally, I'll let the weed wackers and yard blowers have at it. I'll start playing .... 'round noon.​
 

BabyBob

Silver Member
Around 8am I'd say is a good time. Have a light breakfast and go Drumming then come back and have more haha!
 
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