Drumsticks for stick control

Nuzki

Junior Member
Ive used 7As for quite a while now but seems that Im still having abit of issues with stick control at the moment so I am planning on getting those 5A or 5Bs Ahead Polyurethane drumsticks

Do you guys think its a wise choice?

On a side note, I heard that heavier sticks gives you more control; is this true?
 
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Matt Bo Eder

Guest
Ive used 7As for quite a while now but seems that Im still having abit of issues with stick control at the moment so I am planning on getting those 5A or 5Bs Ahead Polyurethane drumsticks

Do you guys think its a wise choice?

On a side note, I heard that heavier sticks gives you more control; is this true?
Well, look at using larger sticks the same as you would as a youngster learning how to write. Remember they didn't give you the slim pencils as a kids? They gave you the fatter ones because it's easier to handle as you learning how to write. Same thing with drumsticks - when I learned, and when I started teaching, I got my beginners off with a pair of 2B sticks. Maybe 5B's...but 2B's is a really good place to start for technique stuff.

And as I got older with better technique, I'd start using thinner sticks. I did at one time play 7A's almost exclusively too, but found I needed more weight for rock 'n' roll, so now I play 5A's, and flip them around when I need the extra weight.
 

Nuzki

Junior Member
Well, look at using larger sticks the same as you would as a youngster learning how to write. Remember they didn't give you the slim pencils as a kids? They gave you the fatter ones because it's easier to handle as you learning how to write. Same thing with drumsticks - when I learned, and when I started teaching, I got my beginners off with a pair of 2B sticks. Maybe 5B's...but 2B's is a really good place to start for technique stuff.

And as I got older with better technique, I'd start using thinner sticks. I did at one time play 7A's almost exclusively too, but found I needed more weight for rock 'n' roll, so now I play 5A's, and flip them around when I need the extra weight.
https://www.long-mcquade.com/2402/Drums/Sticks_Mallets_Brushes/Vic_Firth/2B_American_Classic_Nylon_Tip.htm

Something like that?

By the way, thats exactly the store on where Im buying and I dont think they have 2Bs hanging around much
 

Hollywood Jim

Platinum Member
I'm not understanding how larger heavier sticks give you more control.
What kind of control?

What about hand size?
What if you have smaller hands?
What if you have larger hands?

.
 
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Matt Bo Eder

Guest
https://www.long-mcquade.com/2402/Drums/Sticks_Mallets_Brushes/Vic_Firth/2B_American_Classic_Nylon_Tip.htm

Something like that?

By the way, thats exactly the store on where Im buying and I dont think they have 2Bs hanging around much
Those would work.

And Jim, obviously, if your hands are extremely small or extremely large, you'll want to find a stick that's comfortable. Sometimes big hands and thin sticks don't work because it's all about training your muscles at this point. And as in my pencil analogy, you're training your muscles to be able to manipulate the stick without having to over-grip because it's too thin to comfortably hold.
 

Pocket-full-of-gold

Platinum Member
The hand controls the stick, not the other way round.

Now there'll be personal preferences......there always is. Nothing wrong with embracing them and using whatever you feel most comfortable with.

But the mindset that the gear has more relevance than the guy using it, is nothing more than putting the cart before the horse. It's little more than a road to self imposed limitations. Never an ideal path to travel IMHO.
 

SolubleSound

Junior Member
If you can still find some VF Tomas Haake sticks, I loved those things for Stick Control & snare solo stuff.
A 2B stick will be very similar. The Los Cabos 2B is a favorite of mine.

I know Jojo Mayer and Tony Royster Jr have recommended practicing pad stuff with marching or metal sticks. It's definitely helped me out. My dynamic control has improved a lot thanks to playing through snare solos on the pad with huge sticks.

I wasn't a fan of the Ahead sticks when I tried them, but you should give them a whack and see for yourself!
 

cornelius

Silver Member
Experiment with sticks that fit in your hand well and work for the type of music you’re playing. You’ll feel more control if the sticks feel good in your hands.

On the pad I use Vic Firth "Dom’s Pad Stick” - it’s designed specifically for practice pads. It is a big stick, but it’s not nearly as heavy as marching sticks - I found transitioning back to normal sticks easier with the Pad Stick... Just another option...
 

JustJames

Platinum Member
Bo, while you have a shed load more drumming experience than I do, I'm going to disagree with your skinny pencils analogy. When a kid is learning to write, they are learning the very fine, precise motor control necessary to control the pint of the pencil in small movements when the distance between the grip and the point magnifies the effect of their inputs. Thicker pencils make it easier to control the movement of the point of the pencil. Drumming motions are completely different.

And as pfog says, it's about the hand learning to control what the stick is doing. Why then would you work on stick control with anything but the same sticks that you use for playing?
 

WhoIsTony?

Member
I'm not understanding how larger heavier sticks give you more control.
What kind of control?

What about hand size?
What if you have smaller hands?
What if you have larger hands?

.
you will definitely get more response from any given surface with a 5B or SD1 than a 7A

and I find the more a stick responds .... off a cymbal ... head... pad... whatever... the easier it is to control and manipulate to do as you wish

that is why I always have younger students start with heavier sticks so they learn how to control the response
 

Hollywood Jim

Platinum Member
you will definitely get more response from any given surface with a 5B or SD1 than a 7A
and I find the more a stick responds .... off a cymbal ... head... pad... whatever... the easier it is to control and manipulate to do as you wish
that is why I always have younger students start with heavier sticks so they learn how to control the response
Now this makes some sense to me.

Let's see if I have this right.
With a 5A stick you learn to strike heavy (loud) and light (soft) because you have a broader range to work with.
With a 7A stick you have more of a limited range on the loud end.

So a heavier stick does not "provide" better control. It simply forces you to "develop" more control.

The interesting thing is, it seems that I can play faster with lighter 7A sticks, but not as loud.

.
 
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Matt Bo Eder

Guest
Bo, while you have a shed load more drumming experience than I do, I'm going to disagree with your skinny pencils analogy. When a kid is learning to write, they are learning the very fine, precise motor control necessary to control the pint of the pencil in small movements when the distance between the grip and the point magnifies the effect of their inputs. Thicker pencils make it easier to control the movement of the point of the pencil. Drumming motions are completely different.

And as pfog says, it's about the hand learning to control what the stick is doing. Why then would you work on stick control with anything but the same sticks that you use for playing?
See what Anthony says below. He's saying what I do better than I explain it ;)
 

Scott K Fish

Silver Member
Over the last 50-years, when drummers asked for suggestions on sticks, the 5A was recommended most often as the best yardstick (no pun intended).

Vic Firth's Steve Gadd model stick is basically a 7A. So was Papa Jo Jones's stick. Same with the Mel Lewis model stick.

So it's really a matter of what you're comfortable with. And there's nothing wrong with using different size sticks for different playing situations.

Best,
skf
 

Dr_Watso

Platinum Member
you will definitely get more response from any given surface with a 5B or SD1 than a 7A
By response, you mean one gets more rebound from a larger stick? I hadn't ever noticed that, and for some reason always gravitated towards the smaller 7 sizes, ideally with shorter tapers.

I think previously you had mentioned you used the erskine ride stick for most applications. Is that still true?
 

Toolate

Platinum Member
I learned on 2B's on the pad and still use them but play the kit with 5a's. Always felt the heavier sticks helped my hands develop the feel and muscles faster than a lighter set would. Even used the metal (really heavy) sticks on the pad for this and loved it.

Like practicing harder than you play in the game.
 

WhoIsTony?

Member
By response, you mean one gets more rebound from a larger stick? I hadn't ever noticed that, and for some reason always gravitated towards the smaller 7 sizes, ideally with shorter tapers.

I think previously you had mentioned you used the erskine ride stick for most applications. Is that still true?
the more weight that comes down to more you get in return which gives you more to manipulate if you so chose

I find it gives me more control ... just a personal thing

I don't feel that very light sticks do any work for me at all ... I tend to have to work harder to get what I want from the drum and I don't like that at all

this includes very soft playing and touch

go drop a 7A on a pad then drop a SD1 on a pad and you will see what I mean

...and I've been using the Erskine Big Bands for quite a while now ... which are similar to 5B with a different taper and bead
 

TroutMacDuff

Junior Member
Sticks don't control themselves. I'd say you're best off investing in a nice, versatile set of hands and wrists first. Once you do that you won't need special sticks.
 
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