Drummer as a carrier for old dog 32 years old!

sina

Member
Drummer as a career for old dog 32 years old!

I’m 32 years old and practicing drum by 3 to 4 hours a day. But not just as a hobby but thinking as future carrier. Is it doable to become a great drummer at my age And practice practice practice could help me to reach to that point then I would be able to join cool bands or I’m totally wrong about being a drummer ?!
However I’m good at music listening like vast variety of music from Mils Davis to King crimson and so on and I know a bit about Music theory, and not that much far from music stuff.

By the way here is the list of books I arranged to practice for next three years:HAAHA am I crazy?!

Book name Pages Practice time
Syncopation
Stick Control by George L. Stone
Advanced Techniques for the Modern Drummer by Jim Chapin
Accents and Rebounds by George L. Stone
Master Studies by Joe Morello
Musician's Guide to Polyrhythms (Vol. 1 & 2) by Peter Magadini
The New Breed by Gary Chester
Portraits in Rhythm by Anthony Cirone
realestic drum
double bass drum



Future Sounds by David Garibaldi
Afro-Cuban Rhythms for Drumset by Frank Malabe and Bob Weiner
Drum Concepts and Techniques by Peter Erskine
Modern School for Snare Drum by Morris Goldenberg
The Sound of Brushes by Ed Thigpen
Bass Drum Control by Colin Baile
Patterns (Vol. 1,2,3,4) by Gary Chaffee
Modern Reading Text in 4/4 by Bellson and Breines
Groove Essentials - The Play-Along 1.0



Extreme Interdependence: Drumming Beyond Independence
The Art of Bop Drumming
Stanton Moore Groove Alchemy
Tommy Igoe - Groove Essentials 2.0
Contemporary Drum set Techniques
Take it to the street
The Level System
 
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DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
Possible, but it is very difficult to have a career in music at any age.

You could master all those books, but that doesn't make career.

The question is what do mean by a career? Do what exactly?
Joining a cool band is cool, but it doesn't necessarily mean you would have an income.
 

mikeyhanson

Silver Member
I think shooting for a career is a really high goal to set, and it takes a lot of things besides just chops to get there. Timing, luck, personality, luck, and luck. A whole bunch of other things as well.
Making more realistic mini-goals, like you're doing now with your plans on book studies, is a more reasonable, and ultimately more satisfying method. As you go, things will open up. Playing with other people, getting in bands, and your direction will become clearer as you go.
32 is not too late to start.
 

sina

Member
Hi Drum eat Drum!!

Cool nickname :)
For me carrier means income and pay for bills witch totally different matter than playing in a cool band which is cool.

By the way thx

Hi MikeyHanson

I think your advice followed by Drum eat Drum is more realistic, which the point is mini-goals and let's see what's going on. As much as working harder we'll get luckier.

Cheers
 

Duck Tape

Platinum Member
I think your idea is cool but maybe you're envisioning a skyscraper when all you need is a house.

Tackling all of those books may be too much information to be spreading yourself across and perhaps it's better to learn by repetition, using the same (fewer) practice methods frequently, and mastering them. E.g Stick control, groove essentials, benny greb, virgil donati db freedom alternating each day.

I started at 13, when I couldn't be bothered with a book (even now I struggle) and I learned mostly from watching videos, playing along with CDs and jamming with friends... I think those things are just as important (if not more) as sticking your head in a book.
 

sina

Member
Hey Dre25,

cool note mentioned, maybe I have to choose some of them to start with and focus by subject step by step, once I could get overall image of some concept then further more will come in the next step.

cheers ,
 

sina

Member
Hey Jackie,

HAHAHA, Maybe you are right , but the mentioned books are recommended to learn fundamentals as well. Any ways you mentioned true note, first fundamentals then harder stuff like filling and different time signatures practicing.
However positive note that still I'm young enough to play drums,
cheers
 

Arky

Platinum Member
Honestly it was your post in Gavin Harrison's thread which made me understand what you mean in the thread title... - career!! I thought what sense does "carrier" make... You know, when I read "carrier" I'm thinking of something like an aircraft carrier or whatever but definitely not of "career" (that's a different word, isn't it)... See what difference 1 word can make... Ok, now I know. ;-)
 

drummingman

Gold Member
There's no question you can have a successful music career at any age through hard work and dedication (meaning being able to make a living doing it). Don't let anyone shoot you down if this is what you want to do.

Keeping working through the books you plan to work through. Start taking drum lessons with a great teacher. And by all means start playing with people soon (don't wait until you can play everything you want on the drums before you start playing in bands. This is a big mistake that I know about first hand as I went through a long period where I removed myself from playing with bands and to just practice and am coming out the other side of that now. This set me back in the long run. I should have kept working on the things I was working on while STILL playing in bands and building my music career. But God has a purpose in all things, and for me this was his purpose for other very good reasons).

Stay positive and don't let negative people dissuade you!
 

Dr_Watso

Platinum Member
The way I see it, if you really loved drumming, you wouldn't be asking a question like this. Drumming(music, art) is a life-long commitment to learning more than you could ever learn. I don't think I could ever look at it like a trade such as telecom technician, where you can lay out your on-paper goals, "learn" lots of books and be ready to rake in the bucks.

If you like to play the drums, do so. All that other stuff will come later if your passion makes people want to play with you. You shouldn't force it, especially if your expectations hinge on finances.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
The longer you delay actually playing out with other musicians, the more behind you are getting. You could study all kinds of books for years. That has almost no bearing on how you will play with others. Play with others as the main goal first, and do the books in your spare time. But play with others right away if not sooner. Books cannot prepare you for actually feeling what it feels like to play.

Say you want to.... jump in the water. Is it better to read a book about jumping in the water? Watch a YouTube vid about jumping in the water? No, you will learn much more a lot quicker by just jumping in the water. Music cannot hurt or kill you so there is no physical consequence of making mistakes. It's common knowledge that you learn more from mistakes than you do successes, so the longer you delay making mistakes, and you will make them, the further behind you are.

Just play with others for the sheer fun of it and to experience what it feels like, instead of reading about what some other person says about it at first. Drop the word career. That's so far off that it's stupid to even consider at this point. You're looking so far down the road that you are missing what's right in front of you, meaning the drumset. Just play with others, right away. You will have plenty of time to study and see other POV's. Develop your own POV first. Don't delay playing with others, no matter what level you are.

In case I was in any way unclear lol, what I'm saying is get you butt out there and play, now.
 

sina

Member
all positive note, thanks man. That's the wai I'm trying these days.
There's no question you can have a successful music career at any age through hard work and dedication (meaning being able to make a living doing it). Don't let anyone shoot you down if this is what you want to do.

Keeping working through the books you plan to work through. Start taking drum lessons with a great teacher. And by all means start playing with people soon (don't wait until you can play everything you want on the drums before you start playing in bands. This is a big mistake that I know about first hand as I went through a long period where I removed myself from playing with bands and to just practice and am coming out the other side of that now. This set me back in the long run. I should have kept working on the things I was working on while STILL playing in bands and building my music career. But God has a purpose in all things, and for me this was his purpose for other very good reasons).

Stay positive and don't let negative people dissuade you!
 

sina

Member
Yep Dr.

But For all of us happening sometimes this sort of things in mind. Maybe just needed some good quotes to help keep on track and good to know about others have same feeling or even worrying about future!!!

The way I see it, if you really loved drumming, you wouldn't be asking a question like this. Drumming(music, art) is a life-long commitment to learning more than you could ever learn. I don't think I could ever look at it like a trade such as telecom technician, where you can lay out your on-paper goals, "learn" lots of books and be ready to rake in the bucks.

If you like to play the drums, do so. All that other stuff will come later if your passion makes people want to play with you. You shouldn't force it, especially if your expectations hinge on finances.
 

sina

Member
cool perspective!! this is so natural
I think it's a legitimate question. From my own experience life has a funny way of running intereference with personal goals and plans. You have work around the things that come up and hang in there. The bottom line is if drumming is part of who you are, you will be drumming.
 

sina

Member
In terms of getting familiar with band all important stuff specially learning to listen to other members of band you are truly right. That's I've to work on it , find a place to play and folks around for jamming. But believe me I learn a lot from all quotes witch is still great to share . It's just personal point of view.
Cheers
The longer you delay actually playing out with other musicians, the more behind you are getting. You could study all kinds of books for years. That has almost no bearing on how you will play with others. Play with others as the main goal first, and do the books in your spare time. But play with others right away if not sooner. Books cannot prepare you for actually feeling what it feels like to play.

Say you want to.... jump in the water. Is it better to read a book about jumping in the water? Watch a YouTube vid about jumping in the water? No, you will learn much more a lot quicker by just jumping in the water. Music cannot hurt or kill you so there is no physical consequence of making mistakes. It's common knowledge that you learn more from mistakes than you do successes, so the longer you delay making mistakes, and you will make them, the further behind you are.

Just play with others for the sheer fun of it and to experience what it feels like, instead of reading about what some other person says about it at first. Drop the word career. That's so far off that it's stupid to even consider at this point. You're looking so far down the road that you are missing what's right in front of you, meaning the drumset. Just play with others, right away. You will have plenty of time to study and see other POV's. Develop your own POV first. Don't delay playing with others, no matter what level you are.

In case I was in any way unclear lol, what I'm saying is get you butt out there and play, now.
 
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