Drum Tabs?

procesokafka

Junior Member
Hi all. I'm a newbie and want to know where to get drum tabs.

Our (amateur) band will start practicing Peter Gabriel's "In your eyes" and I'd like to get a view on the drum tab.

Any help will be most appreciated!

Thank you all!!!
 

eddiehimself

Platinum Member
Instead of trying to look for drum tabs maybe you should just download the guitar pro tab and if you don't have guitar pro, download a program known as "tuxguitar". They're not proper drum tabs but you can single the drum part out and it should give you a good idea of what it is.
 

procesokafka

Junior Member
Thanks! I can do that (and of course try to follow the original song).

Though it's always a good idea to have an actual drum tab...
 

matt949

Senior Member
In my opinion drum TABS are actually awful i cant stand them i would muccch rather try to actually read it in real notation. but a google search should easily give you a bunch of tab sites.
 

procesokafka

Junior Member
In my opinion drum TABS are actually awful i cant stand them i would muccch rather try to actually read it in real notation. but a google search should easily give you a bunch of tab sites.
You're right! But I've searched the Web and found no tab for this specific song (I want one coz I guess it would help me, apart from the fact I will practice over the actual song...)
 

what the funk of it

Senior Member
I don't agree with drum tabs either, they're a waste of time. Tabs in general do a terrible job defining rhythms. The reason they work with guitar is that they will tell you what notes to play - well, not the actual note values but rather where the notes are placed on the fretboard - and from there it's pretty much up to you to figure out the strumming/picking rhythms. Is the gap in the page a whole note or quarter note rest? Who knows...

You're better off just listening to the tune and trying to lift it for yourself.
 

procesokafka

Junior Member
I don't agree with drum tabs either, they're a waste of time. Tabs in general do a terrible job defining rhythms. The reason they work with guitar is that they will tell you what notes to play - well, not the actual note values but rather where the notes are placed on the fretboard - and from there it's pretty much up to you to figure out the strumming/picking rhythms. Is the gap in the page a whole note or quarter note rest? Who knows...

You're better off just listening to the tune and trying to lift it for yourself.
I had good experiences with tabs, but it's true that it's better to try over the actual song.

Thanks for the suggestions!!
 

Aleks

Junior Member
Buy guitar pro....its about $60 and its a great program....My band loves me for having it, they get guitar parts that are hard to find transcribed anywhere else, and the tabs are high quality
 

bermuda

Drummerworld Pro Drummer - Administrator
Staff member
I also recommend listening and writing notation yourself, not only so you can get used to determining parts, but because public tabs/music are often inaccurate.

Bermuda
 

eddiehimself

Platinum Member
Buy guitar pro....its about $60 and its a great program....My band loves me for having it, they get guitar parts that are hard to find transcribed anywhere else, and the tabs are high quality
As i've said, tuxguitar works with guitar pro files and it's free!
 
N

nhzoso

Guest
I dont understand how guitarpro can help with drum tabs? Also how can you hate drum tabs? Not everyone has the ability to figure a song out in 3-4 takes not to mention the time it takes too learn it, so if you can glance at a tab and get a general idea of the beat and time whats the big deal?

How exactly does tuxguitar help you with drumming?
 

eddiehimself

Platinum Member
I dont understand how guitarpro can help with drum tabs? Also how can you hate drum tabs? Not everyone has the ability to figure a song out in 3-4 takes not to mention the time it takes too learn it, so if you can glance at a tab and get a general idea of the beat and time whats the big deal?

How exactly does tuxguitar help you with drumming?
It's very simple. Although it doesn't have the actual tab itself, you can isolate the drum track and slow it down to hear how the fills and beats and stuff are done.
 

bermuda

Drummerworld Pro Drummer - Administrator
Staff member
so if you can glance at a tab and get a general idea of the beat and time whats the big deal?
If a general idea is sufficient, why refer to a tab or transcribe parts at all? If a song is worth doing to the extent that knowing the part is important, I don't think a general idea is very helpful. That's like saying the part is "good enough". To me, that's just laziness.

Granted, nobody is required to dissect drum parts like I am, but even when I'm not under the gun to play exact parts, I make sure I'm doing more than just giving the flavor when playing covers. And guess what, the other musicians love it when they hear the parts from the record, and they'll never reprimand the drummer for it. Those are the parts that make the cover worth playing in the first place, right? Is anyone in the audience really interested in hearing a drummer trying to do 'better' parts than Ringo? Mitch? Charlie? Bonham? Travis Barker?

Anyway, it's still my recommendation for the drummer to do the work him/herself and not rely on less-than-accurate tabs or transcriptions. Identifying parts is one of the things musicians do. Relying on someone else to do that work isn't cheating, it's shameful.

Bermuda
 
N

nhzoso

Guest
I think you mistook my meaning, when answering a question like this I guess it's best to know people's intentions and goals as well as place in life. For me being a weekend warrior and this not being my career I do not have 8+ hours a day to spend on learning songs so if I can look at a tab and get the general idea of the beat and maybe a few fills then it works great for me. I will then do what is necessary to get the fill's and beat down just as it was recorded whether that means listening to it and playing along for an hour or so or slowing it down and writing it out. (which is impossible on Itunes) I have gone over many tabs and find mistakes in about 70% of them whether it be missing parts or just plain wrong so in that case you are still learning. Yes it's faster but for me it works.
 

bermuda

Drummerworld Pro Drummer - Administrator
Staff member
For me being a weekend warrior and this not being my career I do not have 8+ hours a day to spend on learning songs so if I can look at a tab and get the general idea of the beat and maybe a few fills then it works great for me.
I understand, and I did say "nobody is required to dissect drum parts like I am." Certainly for a track like "In Your Eyes" it wouldn't be a day-long process anyway. Be aware with that (and many songs) of the amount of non-kit percussion that contributes to the song. Determining which of those parts you can play in addition to playing the kit is what would take some extra time.

I have gone over many tabs and find mistakes in about 70% of them whether it be missing parts or just plain wrong so in that case you are still learning.
I think you're being generous... 99% is probably more like it for tabs posted on the web, which I believe are all homemade (I've never seen commercial tabs for drums.) Even commercial notation isn't completely correct, except possibly if the actual drummer wrote the part.

As for the learning process, I still think it's better to work on everything yourself. It has nothing to do with playing drums as a career or how important a particular song is... it just has to do with playing drums.

Bermuda
 
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dcrigger

Senior Member
Gotta agree with Bermuda here.

The beauty of a notation based process that you do yourself is whatever time you are able to spend includes you listening and immersing yourself in the music.

It is also really, really flexible. Sometimes the situation requires (or at least suggests) that intimate knowledge of the recording at hand would be best. Then something close to a full transcription would be in order (even then, it is real easy to develop little shorthand methods to save writing every last note out).

But sometimes there isn't time or even a need to get every last fill - sometimes just the road map and general gist of the thing is all you need. Great - just do that.

I can bang out parts like that - for myself to read only - in two, maybe three passes through the song. Basically it's about writing down whatever you think you'll need to help you in playing the song. Maybe it needs a full bar by bar chart. Maybe it only needs a bit of a chart to get you going, then some notes like - 2 more verses, a chorus, a gtr. solo, then three choruses... then some note or notation about the ending. TA DA - instant chart! Or at least, cheat sheet.

Now if the next rehearsal or the gig isn't for a week, you don't have to worry about, practicing stuff over and over - just to keep it "in your head". A chart can pull you right back into the last headspace you were in when you last worked on the song.

And the main reason it does this, is that you never really listen to music as closely as when you are transcribing - at that is the period of mental scrutiny that a self-made chart always recalls. Or at least it does for me.

David
 
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