Drum tab?

Jeffrey99

Member
I've recently joined a cover band that plays mostly country and alittle top 40 stuff. Never been a big fan of country but live in Indiana and it's king here. I haven't read sheet music since high school which was about 13 years ago. Even though I'm not against getting back into it. I'm not looking so much for the groove of the song as that's pretty easy to find in country music but looking more to get the intros, stops, starts and fills more accurate. Figure if I'm gonna do a cover might as well make it as good as I can.

So I guess my question is, is sheet music really only solution? Is there a drum tab site? Is my best bet just to print out lyrics and make notes myself? Or just keep practicing to the song till I fill I have it?

Thanks in Advance,
Jeffrey
 

bermuda

Drummerworld Pro Drummer - Administrator
Staff member
I always listen to the original recordings and make cheat sheets as needed. They can be as helpful/personal as you want, no need to adhere to tabs or notation unless necessary.

For example, one of my band's notes says "guit intro, hat in 2nd half w/bass, drums after 4 bars" and another is "rockabilly 2-beat, guit intro, trainish snare" Well, I know what that means, and that's what's important!

Bermuda
 

Jeffrey99

Member
I always listen to the original recordings and make cheat sheets as needed. They can be as helpful/personal as you want, no need to adhere to tabs or notation unless necessary.

For example, one of my band's notes says "guit intro, hat in 2nd half w/bass, drums after 4 bars" and another is "rockabilly 2-beat, guit intro, trainish snare" Well, I know what that means, and that's what's important!

Bermuda
Thanks. After thinking more about it, I figured that'd probably be easiest way to do it. I think trying to follow tabs/sheet music would probably screw me up more in the long run concentrating on that, instead of the music the rest of the band is playing.
 

8Mile

Platinum Member
I always listen to the original recordings and make cheat sheets as needed. They can be as helpful/personal as you want, no need to adhere to tabs or notation unless necessary.

For example, one of my band's notes says "guit intro, hat in 2nd half w/bass, drums after 4 bars" and another is "rockabilly 2-beat, guit intro, trainish snare" Well, I know what that means, and that's what's important!

Bermuda
Awesome. I think this is awesome because it's how I write my own cheat sheets. And since you know what you're doing and do the same thing, I feel pretty good about it now. :)
 
A

Anthony Amodeo

Guest
Awesome. I think this is awesome because it's how I write my own cheat sheets. And since you know what you're doing and do the same thing, I feel pretty good about it now. :)
same exact thought crossed my mind
 

bermuda

Drummerworld Pro Drummer - Administrator
Staff member
Awesome. I think this is awesome because it's how I write my own cheat sheets. And since you know what you're doing and do the same thing, I feel pretty good about it now. :)
The bad news is, another drummer would probably not be able to follow my notes unless they were already familiar enough with the songs to make sense of my 'hints'.

Ask Bo, he got my copy of the set lists & notes when he subbed with one of my bands!

Bermuda
 
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