Drum Snobs

Midnite Zephyr

Platinum Member
Now that I think about it, the drum set I play with the garage band is a drum set that somebody left with the owner of the house. It is a 5 piece Groove Percussion kit. It's really not that bad. I felt at first like WTF is this? I have to play that? But, all in all, it's not so bad. It gets the job done and it doesn't sound that bad. It's the 14" brass GP cymbal that I couldn't hang with. I'd have to say that when hit in the right spot, it has an interesting sound to it, but no, I had to get rid of it. I bought an old 20" 70's A Zildjian for $20 and put in the ride spot, moved the previous ride, an old 18" Zildjian Marching cymbal, to the right and use it as a crash/ride and the 16" Paiste 200 moved to the right where the GP was. I would like to replace the 13" B8 hats with some 13" Paiste signature hats, but I can find something cheaper for around $50. ZBT's? I don't know. I might be a snob about ZBT's. I am a snob about brass cymbals. No. Just. No.
 

iwearnohats

Silver Member
My biggest issue and experience with drum snobs are the people who think that technical music is not musical, the drummer can't groove, etc., all that typical nonsense. It annoys me to no end.

I can proudly say I am 100% not a drum snob. I play what I like the sound of (which just happens to only include European cymbal brands), and I try to find something to learn from EVERY single drummer I hear perform. I evaluate their playing (whether or not I would consider myself a better drummer) and try to pick things that I might be doing wrong from watching them, and also to steal their ideas.

I cannot stand drummers - or any musicians - who think they are on the One True Path, or that technical = unmusical, talk rubbish about people being unable to 'groove' etc. As far as I'm concerned, anyone who has this sort of close-minded, ignorant attitude is a drum snob.

Also, people who cannot appreciate hard work. I've seen people comment on one of Chris Brien's earlier videos when he was demonstrating 6-way independence and went out of a bit of time. Said drummers dismissed it entirely because he got a bit out. It doesn't matter that his coordination and ability to create such complex rhythms took years and years of hard work, oh no, it was meaningless because of a mistake.

Everyone's here to learn, everyone makes mistakes, and we're all on different paths and at different stages. If you're a snob in any way, then you're just being close-minded and need to grow up and open your eyes. Only then can you truly start to learn and make yourself into a truly complete musician.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
For reference: Definition: Snob (copy and pasted)

1. One who tends to patronize, rebuff, or ignore people regarded as social inferiors and imitate, admire, or seek association with people regarded as social superiors.
2. One who affects an offensive air of self-satisfied superiority in matters of taste or intellect.

A snob is a person who believes in the existence of an equation between status and human worth.[1] In other words, a snob values another person primarily on the basis of the level of social rank that such other person holds in society. This implies that a snob judges who is allowed into the snob's circle of acquaintances and friends primarily on the basis of the status of such candidate. One is consequentially highly likely to lose a snob's affection and attention soon after one has lost one's status.

1. Anyone who thinks they are better than someone else based upon superficial factors.
 
T

The Old Hyde

Guest
Gear snobs can be the worst! I met a guy backstage once at a meet and greet and he was telling me about his DW kit. I asked what model, color, setup etc. then my wife said I played too, I usually don't tell people unless asked, that's just me. anyway he says what brand and when I said Ludwig, conversation over? Not in a mean way but just, no questions about my stuff....also he couldn't wait to show me pics on his phone of him playing....they were from the early 80's...hahahaha
 

bigiainw

Gold Member
In other words, a snob values another person primarily on the basis of the level of social rank that such other person holds in society. This implies that a snob judges who is allowed into the snob's circle of acquaintances and friends primarily on the basis of the status of such candidate.
On that basis, I am indeed then a cymbal snob, as none can come in that are not cast nor made by Zildjian (although I don't mind whether thay are A, K, Z or custom or not). that said, I wouldn't slag anyone else off for their choices. I am therefore, an equal opportunities cymbal snob.

Or maybe I'm just selective about my metalic aquaintances?

Maybe I'm thinking about this too much.....
 

SquadLeader

Gold Member
Drum snobbery is a way of patting yourself on the back. Making yourself feel good about yourself. I'm not saying it's good, it's probably not. But I know it happens because I've done it. Could be any thing from insecurity to arrogance to an unenlightened attitude, but it seems like a way of consoling oneself. Which implies that something is upsetting. Which there might well be, attitude-wise at least. So any time I catch myself feeling like snobby, I will try to remember this thread and try and let it go...rise above it. I'll let you know how that goes lol.

I'm just having a hard time separating which part is snob and which part is competitive. Could they be one in the same?

You're competitive in something which isn't, usually, 'competition' ?

I've find drummers to be the opposite largely of what you profess to be...usually quite helpful with a good spirit of community and mutual assistance. It's one of the great things about being a drummer for me.

I'm probably opposite end of the scale. I go into every gig with other bands knowing that I'll probably be the worst drummer there. I've taken too many sabaticals from the instrument to realistically compete high up the skill tree.

But...really..I couldn't give a toss. If other guys wanna 'compete' against me well, knock yourselves out, cos you win...well done.
 

SquadLeader

Gold Member
On that basis, I am indeed then a cymbal snob, as none can come in that are not cast nor made by Zildjian (although I don't mind whether thay are A, K, Z or custom or not). that said, I wouldn't slag anyone else off for their choices. I am therefore, an equal opportunities cymbal snob.

Or maybe I'm just selective about my metalic aquaintances?

Maybe I'm thinking about this too much.....
Snobbery pre-supposes that Zildjian are the best cymbal manufacturer...which they're quite patently not as, for so many reasons, Stagg currently are.

Just saying...

:)
 
T

The Old Hyde

Guest
Snobbery pre-supposes that Zildjian are the best cymbal manufacturer...which they're quite patently not as, for so many reasons, Stagg currently are.

Just saying...

:)
I agree, Paiste is the best cymbal manufacuturer....
 

longgun

Gold Member
Not sure if it is "Snobbery"...............but I get a totally different vibe when I see a DW kit onstage or if it's a "Percussion Plus". One is top of the line and one is not...............

Now if the drummer kills it on a PP kit, I'd be very impressed.

To me, it's the same if a guitarist shows up with a Les Paul or a First Act........................

IMO, Professional gear and a professional attitude generally go hand in hand.
 

rogue_drummer

Gold Member
Anyone ever walk into a bar and see a totally obscure drummer playing a less-than-stellar brand kit - in other words - kind of a trashy torn up, no name kit you'd find at a flea market or garage sale and he or she is just kicking butt and sounds totally awesome? The kind where the kit is obviously piece-mealed together and the cymblals are more like trashcan lids but the drummer is just excellent and has superb chops. And taking with them on breaks you find they are the most kind, modest people on the planet.

Those are the guys (and gals) admire most.
 

dmacc_2

Well-known member
...... I've taken too many sabaticals from the instrument to realistically compete high up the skill tree.
......
Ironically I've not had any long term sabaticals (except for a few months when my daughter was born) and I'm still not in the position to realistically compete high up the skill tree.
 

DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
One can not be on this forum without encountering drum snobbery from time to time.

It's almost impossible to discuss Ringo, Neil, Lars, or even Mr Copeland around here without someone making negative comments, and that usually ignore the historical references and significance of said artist in favor of only what is now.

Drumming is not chicken vs egg. We can follow that Person A influenced person B, and Person B learned everything Person A did and then took another step, so while that might make person B appear to be a better drummer NOW, but that does not diminish person A's historical contributions to drums.

And then there are the discussions on a topic where someone will say something along the lines of "well, a serious musician would never..." despite the plethora of evidence that numerous top names in drumming have indeed done something related to that topic. Which always boggles my mind that people deny what happens in the real world under a false pretense.
 

mymarkers

Senior Member
Despite my inner engineer reminding me that it's incredibly practical, I can't help but judge drummers who mount their rack tom on a snare stand for being too cool to use the bass drum, tom stand, or even a rack like everybody else.
 

Dr_Watso

Platinum Member
Despite my inner engineer reminding me that it's incredibly practical, I can't help but judge drummers who mount their rack tom on a snare stand for being too cool to use the bass drum, tom stand, or even a rack like everybody else.
What? Perhaps that's just the only way to get it positioned and stable how they want it. I think you underestimate the validity of the solution, and also how many amazing drummers like to set up this way. It has literally nothing to do with being "too cool".
 

mymarkers

Senior Member
I am fully aware of reasons to do it. It's a great idea. I just can't help but feel that way despite knowing better. I meant that statement largely to admit my own shortcoming.

Despite my inner engineer reminding me that it's incredibly practical, I can't help but judge drummers who mount their rack tom on a snare stand for being too cool to use the bass drum, tom stand, or even a rack like everybody else.
 

sam13

Member
I think we're all a bit competitive but we can see when this is anti-social and hopefully grow on from it, or at least learn to hide it. The snobs that really bore me are the guys that think a badge or a logo makes their stuff intangibly superior.
Keep in mind this can go the other way as well, where people will automatically judge you as being snobbish just because you are sporting said badges or logos.
 

Dr_Watso

Platinum Member
I am fully aware of reasons to do it. It's a great idea. I just can't help but feel that way despite knowing better. I meant that statement largely to admit my own shortcoming.
I guess I just don't understand why you would assume it means they think they are "too cool" for a different method...
 

poika

Silver Member
I am always amused at people who have achieved little in music who dis Meg. Personally, I respect anyone who can produce the goods at big gigs.
^^This

Also, one thing that gets me everytime is the attitude towards muffling the heads and porting the bass drum.
You can have your bass drum as boomy and your snare as ringy as you like, but please excuse me for liking a somewhat drier sound.


Love this Isaac Hayes clip with the drums all taped up :)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vmnl9acCsro
 

brady

Platinum Member
I've met quite a few drum snobs. But I haven't met the guy that is apparently one of the worst one in my town.

A couple years ago, this guy filled in for me on drums at my church on a weekend I was gone. I forget who he was, I think he was maybe a friend of the worship leader. Anyway, he complained the whole time about how the kit was set up, how it was tuned, etc. He even took a jacket from the worship leader (I would have loved to see how that went down exactly...) and proceeded to stick it in the bass drum. It was still in there when I came back the next week. Keep in mind, he had to actually remove one of the heads to do this. Did everyone seriously just stand around and watch this guy do this during rehearsal?! Weird...

It wasn't even touching either of the heads. It was just thrown in because he told them kick drums are supposed to be filled with something.

Needless to say, the kid has never been back.
 
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