Drum Skill somehow Decreased..Need Advice

Powerslave

Junior Member
Hi there, This is my first ever post so I apologise If I have posted this thread in the wrong location.
Recently, i got a new pair of double pedals, (Speed cobras), replacing my old budget Mapex ones. For the first few days, they were bliss, they felt amazingly light and great, and my playing felt better than ever. Then about 3 days later, I tried to play, and I could't play ANYTHING like how I used to. Its not my imagination it is literally a massive, massive difference. Since then, it has only gotten worse the more frustrated I get. I have fiddles with every setting, tried my old double pedals, tried different bass drums, ect. When I play my feet speed up ad tense of the first few notes. I have no idea whats happened, and any advice would be greatly appreciated
 

PQleyR

Platinum Member
Welcome to the forum! Could you describe in a bit more detail what's changed? What is it exactly that you find you can no longer do? I play Speed Cobras myself so I should be able to understand what you're experiencing, hopefully.
 

Powerslave

Junior Member
Hi. thanks for getting back and welcoming me :D
Basically any straight roll at any kind of speed is making my legs tense and lock up. And its getting worse. I fell this is becoming more a mental problem.
 

Arky

Platinum Member
Stay relaxed - physically AND mentally! I'm having those problems, too. They appear here and there - it has gotten much better but that was a process of... months. Just pull through. But don't push yourself into a (mental) dead end. Your feet need time to figure stuff out, and playing "just" a roll on the double pedal isn't as simple as it might seem... You need good coordination and (sometimes overlooked) very good balance on the throne.

Just don't get discouraged but continue to practice. Slow the tempo down, choose a speed which lets you play without messing up, and believe me, it will get better. It's a medium term matter.

You could also try to start learning new foot techniques (BTW - which techniques are you playing?). Or select a few rudiments and apply them to the feet. I'm noticing regardless of the decent tempos I can play singles and doubles at, flams are particularly challenging and make me start from scratch, at slo-mo speed. But they're so rewarding in terms of control. What helped me to clean up my footwork when the feet were messing up is accenting the "1" of every 1-2 bars, this helps me to stay in sync. Works at any tempo!
 

Otto

Platinum Member
I have experienced the "losing ability" thing alot over the years.

It usually happens when my perceptions change due to a skill increase...or while reprogramming muscle memories when I change technique or equipment.

No reason for alarm...its normal(within reason)...and usually a sign of some form of improvement related to your playing.

Keep practicing!...it will clear itself up!
 

Elpecs

Senior Member
Yes, just keep practicing! I know it is frustrating not being able to play something that you already could. I remember I had problems starting the rolls.

Once I could start them everything was great, but from time to time it was like my body and brain froze themselves and I couldn't start the singles with my right foot. It was crazy.

Keep playing and don't be discouraged, everything comes with time if you put the effort into making it happen.
 

brittc89

Pioneer Member
Its psychosomatic, all in your head. Just chilllll, take a few days off, and come back to it. Dont be nervous about "what if I suddenly just forget how to play????!!!!" That doesnt really happen ever. Just take a few days off. Itll make a world of difference.
 

TNA

Senior Member
I think everyone has had this at one point. It's kinda like having an off day, except it lasts a lot longer. Like everyone said just keep playing and it will work itself out. You will probably come out better than you were before after you get out of this funk.
 

Anon La Ply

Renegade
I'm interested in this because my brain gets in the way too. Britt put it succinctly.

This is not only a big issue for musicians but anyone aiming for peak performance - be it a public speaker, comedian, actor or sportsperson. It's especially clear in sport where you hear about players being in or out of form or golfers having phases where they have the putting "yips".

I've given some thought to the process and I think it boils down to ego. Once I think, "Heyyy, I getting pretty good" the house of cards is about to tumble. The thought, "I'm so crap. Everyone is better than me" isn't much better. Both are ego-driven stances and are obviously just baggage that weigh down our music making.

When I play well, my ego and mind are quiet - I'm just involved in the music. In that state I am happy to play the most simple and repetitive thing without trying to "add" to it or getting bored if that's what the music requires. I'm too busy being engaged in the music to fuss with ego crap.

In that state an error by me is no bigger a deal than a bulnder by any member of the band. It's not about me or how good I am or perceived to be - it's about the song flow, the journey, the message, the buzz etc.

When in a good state of mind, if I played a tasteless fill that was more about ego than song flow it would feel as jarring as if I did a timing error - bigger at times. Both disrupt the song flow. I'm caring about the music, wanting the song to be expressed the way I - as a listener - want to hear it.

In a nutshell, "pride comes before the fall" and "Turn off you mind, relax and float downstream".

My 1½c
 

Powerslave

Junior Member
Thanks for the replies guys. I just sucked it up at and took three days away from the stool, and when I came back, I was filled with a strange optimism and determination to just get my skill back. and after an hour, HERE IT IS!!! , just like it never left me :D
 
Thanks for the replies guys. I just sucked it up at and took three days away from the stool, and when I came back, I was filled with a strange optimism and determination to just get my skill back. and after an hour, HERE IT IS!!! , just like it never left me :D
Yeah sometimes less practice is better
 

Chunky

Silver Member
Stay relaxed - physically AND mentally! I'm having those problems, too. They appear here and there - it has gotten much better but that was a process of... months. Just pull through. But don't push yourself into a (mental) dead end. Your feet need time to figure stuff out, and playing "just" a roll on the double pedal isn't as simple as it might seem... You need good coordination and (sometimes overlooked) very good balance on the throne.

Just don't get discouraged but continue to practice. Slow the tempo down, choose a speed which lets you play without messing up, and believe me, it will get better. It's a medium term matter.

You could also try to start learning new foot techniques (BTW - which techniques are you playing?). Or select a few rudiments and apply them to the feet. I'm noticing regardless of the decent tempos I can play singles and doubles at, flams are particularly challenging and make me start from scratch, at slo-mo speed. But they're so rewarding in terms of control. What helped me to clean up my footwork when the feet were messing up is accenting the "1" of every 1-2 bars, this helps me to stay in sync. Works at any tempo!
I think Arky's spot on. Good balance and posture on the throne makes all the difference. All my power on the kicks comes from my back. If I slouch I lose power and run out of gas.

Also there may be more variables, what else has changed on you or you kit?

I got a new pair of Nike airs, seemed similar to my old worn in ones but the difference was my new ones were more for show, my old ones were for sport. The new oneshad thick soles with no trench in the middle of the foot and no give, no matter how much I wore them in.
They absolutely destroyed my technique, it took me weeks to figure out what was causing it.
I also think you're right about the mental side too.
It plays a big part, I psyche myself out all the time if I tweak my settings. I'm also terrified to try new shoes out aswell now....

You may also be in the 'inbetween stage', you haven't quite got there with your new pedals but, you're too far to go back.
I do this with techniques all the time. Play a syncopated double kick part correctly but with an inferior footing, come up with the best best footing, learn it at a slower speed then qbout halfway through I can't play it up to speed but, I also can't go back and do it the old way anymore.
It's tedious but your wiping your memory and replacing it with better stuff. Maybe this is happening to you?
If it is then fear not, you'll get there fast. Good luck!
 
Top