Drum Gloves

drummingman

Gold Member
Do drum gloves reduce the shock that one feels in their hands and arms? I saw an interview with Tico Torres where he was endorsing Ahead sticks and gloves. He let it be known that he used to suffer with carpel tunnel and after switching to Ahead sticks he no longer suffers with it. I have to wonder if the Ahead gloves helped as well?
 

Arky

Platinum Member
I don't have any experience on drum gloves, but I learned that different sticks translate the stroke impact quite differently, ranging from very direct to minimal. This doesn't correspond to the stick thickness. You might experiment with different sticks, focusing on their stroke absorption characteristics, before buying gloves. Gloves should reduce the impact to some degree, gloves are another way of either further reduce the impact in case you're already using 'low impact' sticks, or make some preferred 'high impact' sticks work better or acceptable for you in the first place.

When I'm practicing I notice that slight variations of finger positions make me feel way more impact sometimes (esp. with left hand/trad grip). I don't like this and try to correct this right away. So (a big) part of the impact depends on the grip/playing technique also.
 

Naigewron

Platinum Member
I used gloves for a year or two, and they definitely didn't absorb or reduce the shock directly. However, they do allow you to grip the stick looser and still get very powerful strokes, and a looser grip means that less shock will go into your wrists and arms.

Many drummers frown upon gloves because they claim it will cause you to lose feel of the stick. While that's true, the finer feel isn't what's important when you're pounding out a rock backbeat. Powerful and consistent strokes are the key, and gloves are a useful tool in allowing your hands to relax while pounding away. I'd definitely recommend you try it out. It's not for everybody, but some people really dig playing with gloves. I keep a pair in my stick bag at all times, in case I need them (for example if my hands are really sore and tired, or I have painful blisters).
 

Pocket-full-of-gold

Platinum Member
I used gloves for a year or two, and they definitely didn't absorb or reduce the shock directly.
Agreed. The difference between a gloved hand and an ungloved hand is bugger all, as far as impact is concerned........friction is where the "difference" really becomes noticeable.

FWIW, holding the sticks correctly will reduce that friction anyway. I've been there......and I've been back. Take it from one who's sat on both sides of this fence......gloves are a bandaid.....nothing more, nothing less. Learn to grip 'em properly and you just don't need 'em.
 

Naigewron

Platinum Member
FWIW, holding the sticks correctly will reduce that friction anyway. I've been there......and I've been back. Take it from one who's sat on both sides of this fence......gloves are a bandaid.....nothing more, nothing less. Learn to grip 'em properly and you just don't need 'em.
It's a comfort thing too, I feel. I've replaced gloves with Vic Firth Vic Grip, which have the same effect for me. Some guys just find gloves to be very comfortable when it comes to gripping the stick, and there's nothing wrong with that. It's like preferring the comfort of a big, cushioned throne over a small, hard one, or playing in shorts instead of a suit.
 

Davo-London

Gold Member
I don't agree that gloves do nothing to reduce the shock. Any interface between the skin and the impact should make some difference even if it is small. Whilst it's different, playing golf without a glove can be very painful. Similarly using cycling gloves on a racing bicycle does make a difference to the amount of shock you experience. A long ride can be made less exhausting with gloves.

So go ahead and try and see what difference it makes to you.

I'm a light player and so the issue only comes up when i dep for drummers in rock bands. I defo feel the increased shock of playing harder. If I played as hard as Copeland I'm sure I would have all sorts of issues!

Davo
 

drummingman

Gold Member
My grip is good and I never get blisters. I never grip real tight.

I tried on a pair of the Ahead gloves tonight. I felt like I was playing with all thumbs. I'm sure I'd get used to them if I played with them for awhile.

I'm looking into the Zildjian anti-vibe sticks as is.
 

tard

Gold Member
I dont care for the gloves. I find I dont have as good of feel for the stick and have a tendency to drop them when playing light. I also dont care for the rubber grip coating or rubber roll on grips, the stick doesnt move in my hands at all and causes blisters plus I find my hands sweat more than with a plain unpainted and unvarnished stick.
 

mikel

Platinum Member
I would also be very wary of Mr Torres pushing the products he gets paid to endorse. They may be the best thing since sliced bread,but how would you know?
He is unlikely to say anything bad about a company that gives him money.
On the other hand (no pun intended, oh go on then) gloves might be just the thing for you. Trying is the only way to find out.
 

Naigewron

Platinum Member
I would also be very wary of Mr Torres pushing the products he gets paid to endorse. They may be the best thing since sliced bread,but how would you know?
He is unlikely to say anything bad about a company that gives him money.
Do you actually know that he's being paid? Most endorsement deals don't involve payment, only discounted or (in rare cases) free products in exchange for the artist appearing in ads and promoting the product.
 

drummingman

Gold Member
I picked up a pair of the Ahead drum gloves. I find it hard to hold onto the stick with them. I may try to pick up a pair of the Zildjian gloves because they are a bit thinner.
 

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
If you want to go really thin, try actual golfing gloves. I picked up a pair and they were great for playing. I don't have a technique issue and I don't normally have to wear gloves, but this time due to the winter weather, the skin on the tips of my fingers started to split and I used the gloves to cover the band-aids on the tips of my fingers while they healed up. They worked out great. I thought they were a bit cheaper than drummer's gloves, but nicer because it was just like a second skin.
 

New Tricks

Platinum Member
I don't wear gloves at work (construction) and I don't wear batting gloves playing my other passion (softball). I really don't see the need for gloves while playing drums.

I did see a drummer on TV last week, wearing what looked like latex gloves, for grip I presume? I'm constantly dropping sticks so I do need to eventually do something. The solution for me is probably something simple like grip tape......or pine tar :)
 

drummingman

Gold Member
If you want to go really thin, try actual golfing gloves. I picked up a pair and they were great for playing. I don't have a technique issue and I don't normally have to wear gloves, but this time due to the winter weather, the skin on the tips of my fingers started to split and I used the gloves to cover the band-aids on the tips of my fingers while they healed up. They worked out great. I thought they were a bit cheaper than drummer's gloves, but nicer because it was just like a second skin.
Thanks for the tip Bo! I just picked up a pair of the Zildjian gloves tonight so I'm going to see how they work.
 
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