Drawings for new studio - comments welcome

imispgh

Senior Member
The plans attached are for a room over a 4 car garage

The drum room is to the left of the control room - it has sliding glass panels that allow the front to be open. It has room for acoustic and elect kits as well as stands for control panels. The room just below/right of the control room is a vocal room. The room below that is for equipment. Special windows between all rooms to be able to see everywhere and to cut down on sound and reflections. The area far left is the listening area. The 3 rectangles in the middle are throw rugs for musicians. In the center of that cables for audio and power connect to floor panels so no wires have to transverse the floor. There will be a ceiling grid for mics etc. It will also have special air handling and isolation in the walls and floor to keep as much sound as possible from going outside etc. There will be an intercom system and a light cue for visitors in case we are recording. The stairs will be wide.

There is a bath and shower, a fridge and a work and eating area (rear left)

I do plan on using a professional to get the room right. Ceiling and walls will have panels to deal with reflections, corners will have traps. Will use wall panels raised where they meet vertically to minimize parallel surfaces.Using throw rugs on a wood floor where the players are. Listening area has a carpet.
 

Attachments

eddiehimself

Platinum Member
Hang on a tick, just need to find my lower jaw. It's around here somewhere....

Wow, this looks like it's gonna be a professional studio, and above a 4 car garage too! Are you a rockstar or something? You've GOT to post pics and of course RECORDINGS when you eventually get this done!
 

imispgh

Senior Member
Hang on a tick, just need to find my lower jaw. It's around here somewhere....

Wow, this looks like it's gonna be a professional studio, and above a 4 car garage too! Are you a rockstar or something? You've GOT to post pics and of course RECORDINGS when you eventually get this done!
No not a rock star or anyhting close. I just may be coming in to some money soon. Kind of a dream house I have been designing and creating lists for for 15 years. I actually just started drumming a year or so ago. I play harmonica to and would like to try the bass. I have this thing for creating and listening to well recorded music - of all styles. When it is built I intend to use it to jam, listen, create/record a little and maybe rent it out here and there. If it happens it will be in the North Hills of Pittsburgh.

I have found it is rare to have a good studio and listening area in one place.

The 4 car garage is actually pretty deep too - for storage and lawn mowers etc.

The outside dimensions are about 50 X 40.

You should see the downstairs game room of the house, with indoor golf (video games too), bar, pool, shuffleboard 22', darts, weight room and a home theater. It has a double sided bar and glass door on each side with access to the pool.

One can dream.
 

DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
Just be aware that sound proofing an upstairs is difficult, although not impossible.

Not a lot of studio designers have many nice things to say about an upstairs room, but I was able to make mine work.

I put 5/8" quiterock on the floor (under the flooring) and again on the ceiling of the garage.
My walls are 1-3/8" thick quiterock. I wanted to do off-set 2x4 on 2x6, but that was impossible given the garage was already build on 2x4 frames. Double walls were also impossible to put on the existing frame. So quiterock was the only real alternative given the limitations of my framing.

Sound doesn't leak out of the building much, because the garage acts like a giant bass trap. If anything happens in the studio, it sounds an earthquake in the garage, but if you stand outside the garage, not so bad. The moral is, don't have a recording or jam session while the garage door is open.

Good luck.
 

oops

Silver Member
I like the idea, I hope it works out for you.

One thing you haven't talked about: the number of windows you're planning on having: will these be some sort of "sound-proof" or "sound-resistant" windows? ie. double glazed or two sheets with a vaccuum in between?

Same deal with doors: How are you planning on sound proofing the doors? The worst thing you can do is just leave it, as you'll have tremendous problems with drums leaking through into the main room.

I might suggest you get a sound engineer in to discuss various ideas about the layout, as well as the guy you get in to work on the building.
 

eddiehimself

Platinum Member
I like the idea, I hope it works out for you.

One thing you haven't talked about: the number of windows you're planning on having: will these be some sort of "sound-proof" or "sound-resistant" windows? ie. double glazed or two sheets with a vaccuum in between?

Same deal with doors: How are you planning on sound proofing the doors? The worst thing you can do is just leave it, as you'll have tremendous problems with drums leaking through into the main room.

I might suggest you get a sound engineer in to discuss various ideas about the layout, as well as the guy you get in to work on the building.
he did say he's getting a professional in to help him out. A good idea with soundproofing is to get something like triple glazed windows and the other thing that many professional studios do is seperate out rooms with double doors about the thickness of the walls (which tend to be pretty thick for obvious reasons lol) to create sort of an "air gap" between one room and another and help cut down on sound leakage between rooms, maybe an idea to think about.
 

sio_13

Senior Member
I would try to avoid parallel walls and right angled corners if at all possible, as it can cause terrible phase issues and frequency build-up (unless you completely dampen the room, but then the drums will sound dead imo}. Also, the higher the ceiling, the better. When only tracking drums, I'd set em up in the main room and throw in a couple room mics (if you're lookin for a 'huge' drum sound). Of course, this will be mainly for your own enjoyment, as you've said already, so I don't think a pro tracking setup is that necessary. I have gotten pretty good results in rooms nowhere near as nice as this so yeah I envy you.
Oh yeah, if noise leakage is a problem, you can always 'float' the room (google it, there's many sites that will explain better than I can).
 

imispgh

Senior Member
Just be aware that sound proofing an upstairs is difficult, although not impossible.

Not a lot of studio designers have many nice things to say about an upstairs room, but I was able to make mine work.

I put 5/8" quiterock on the floor (under the flooring) and again on the ceiling of the garage.
My walls are 1-3/8" thick quiterock. I wanted to do off-set 2x4 on 2x6, but that was impossible given the garage was already build on 2x4 frames. Double walls were also impossible to put on the existing frame. So quiterock was the only real alternative given the limitations of my framing.

Sound doesn't leak out of the building much, because the garage acts like a giant bass trap. If anything happens in the studio, it sounds an earthquake in the garage, but if you stand outside the garage, not so bad. The moral is, don't have a recording or jam session while the garage door is open.

Good luck.
Thanks - I hope to have the garage and the house separated by a short connection point which will then lead to a large pantry, laundry area then that goes to the house. This passage way in is narrower than the house - like an enclosed hallway. I hope to isolate that from the garage by having few touch points. So the bass doesn't transmit through members to the house
 

imispgh

Senior Member
I would try to avoid parallel walls and right angled corners if at all possible, as it can cause terrible phase issues and frequency build-up (unless you completely dampen the room, but then the drums will sound dead imo}. Also, the higher the ceiling, the better. When only tracking drums, I'd set em up in the main room and throw in a couple room mics (if you're lookin for a 'huge' drum sound). Of course, this will be mainly for your own enjoyment, as you've said already, so I don't think a pro tracking setup is that necessary. I have gotten pretty good results in rooms nowhere near as nice as this so yeah I envy you.
Oh yeah, if noise leakage is a problem, you can always 'float' the room (google it, there's many sites that will explain better than I can).
Thanks - plan to float the room. I thought about having the drums on a platform that rides out to the floor on rails that are embedded in the floor. I created the room I have with sliding glass panels in the front to let me be part of the band room when it makes sense and isolate when it doesn't. Plus I like to record and listen to things from my drum stool. Which is why I use a hospital table next to me. It has the mixer and a laptop. In the future I would want to remote the console control from there
 

denisri

Silver Member
Hi
Several comments>>>Great room...You may want to build on floor the existing floor with a acoustical brake and material. same with the walls...particularly the wall adjoining to the house(if any).
Note if you have automatic garage doors below you may want to deal with them..they are wicked loud from above(or within your new room).
Also, research your window selection for sound transmission....I don't know if you have neighbors or other sound generating objects near you like factories etc..
You need to also have sound traps in your supply and return ductwork.
Denis
 

imispgh

Senior Member
Hi
Several comments>>>Great room...You may want to build on floor the existing floor with a acoustical brake and material. same with the walls...particularly the wall adjoining to the house(if any).
Note if you have automatic garage doors below you may want to deal with them..they are wicked loud from above(or within your new room).
Also, research your window selection for sound transmission....I don't know if you have neighbors or other sound generating objects near you like factories etc..
You need to also have sound traps in your supply and return ductwork.
Denis
Thanks. Yeah I deal with the garage doors in a room above a garage now. Hope to isolate the floors better. Shouldn't happen often though. Of course Murphy rules
 

freebirdgdw

Silver Member
dude this is too cool. I'm still trying to convince my mum that we dont need table and chairs to eat at to make more space for my kit :p

Are you planning on renting it out to bands etc once finished because they could pretty much live up there.
 

mcbike

Silver Member
when I record I usually hate when the drums are in an iso booth they should be in the biggest room.

the only drum booth I have really loved was this studio in houston that had maybe a 15x11 room with 14 foot cielings. the walls were all made out of a fake stone wall that looked like stacked stones. they had 3 heavy black drapes that were on electric motors and you could adjust the amount of drapes and really customize the sound of the room. it was pretty awesome! you don't need motorized drapes but it's a cool idea.
 

Skulmoski

Gold Member
Keep in mind that you will need areas for storage; usually more than you will think necessary.

Good luck with your project. Have fun with it!

GJS
 

imispgh

Senior Member
dude this is too cool. I'm still trying to convince my mum that we dont need table and chairs to eat at to make more space for my kit :p

Are you planning on renting it out to bands etc once finished because they could pretty much live up there.
Yes I plan to rent it out.
 

imispgh

Senior Member
Keep in mind that you will need areas for storage; usually more than you will think necessary.

Good luck with your project. Have fun with it!

GJS
Good point. Have tons of storage room just below. The 4 car garage is extended by about 15ft to allow for a separate room for storage. It has a garage door of it's own facing the car area and outside to the back. That is so I can drive straight through with a car or tractor as well as gice acces to the storage room from the rear.

Plus there is an equipment room i could put a storage rack in
 

jer

Silver Member
Not sure what it's like in Pittsburg, but here in Ontatio, when you put a washroom up there - it's considered a residence, therefore increasing your property tax. If you claim that it's a business, you must make sure you get the proper permits to run a business from the home.

Or you can have the inspector in before you install plumbing and electrical, just seal up any holes you may have made / left...

Looks awesome! Hopefully your dream will see reality some day!
 

DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
Thanks - I hope to have the garage and the house separated by a short connection point which will then lead to a large pantry, laundry area then that goes to the house. This passage way in is narrower than the house - like an enclosed hallway. I hope to isolate that from the garage by having few touch points. So the bass doesn't transmit through members to the house
I have the same set up with the hallway/laundry room leading to the kitchen. I was able to stuff the ceiling above the hallway with a lot of insulation, and so you can hear some stuff in the hall, but nothing in the house. I was worried it would be an issue, but it's not at all.

I did take a lot of precautions with the plumbing, because water pipes can be a potential sound wave transfer point. I coated every pipe with a special paint that is supposed to prevent vibrations, then wrapped each pipe with standard pipe insulation sleeves, and then regular insulation in the walls. It took a lot of extra effort, but it appears to be worth it.
 
Top