Does anyone make a Mahogany/Bubinga kit?

tbdd

Senior Member
I have read threw many a thread trying to find out which is deeper fater sounding and apparently they both are? does anybody know if there are any companys making a Mahogany/Bubinga kit as that like the birch/bubinga?
 

daredrummer

Gold Member
They're both not the most common woods used. So I seriously doubt any mass produced kit is going to be using that combo. If you really want those two woods then there are tons of custom companies that will do it for you.

There are many other really deep sounding kits though, that aren't as expensive as a custom would be.
 

keep it simple

Platinum Member
I have read threw many a thread trying to find out which is deeper fater sounding and apparently they both are? does anybody know if there are any companys making a Mahogany/Bubinga kit as that like the birch/bubinga?
If you think they're both the same, why complicate things by going for a hybrid? The truth is, they're similar, but not the same. Bubinga will give you the ultimate lows beyond mahogany, but not by much. Think of bubinga as the "smiley" EQ of timber species, whereas mahogany is more of a linear slope from 0db at the top end to +4db at the bottom (obviously, not exact figures, just a representation).

I have two issues with hybrid of similar characteristic species. First, a hybrid effectively gives you half the characteristics of both, but tends to miss out on the distinctive voice of a single species. Second, in a ply kit construction, you're unlikely to bring out the true flavour of the fundamental tone (unless it's a thin shell & preferably free floating), & where do you place the bias? Which species goes on the inside of the shell?

Honestly, your required fat & low sound is more to do with tuning & head selection than it is the wood species. Don't get me wrong, wood choice is the foundation, but hybrid is a complication too far in species of very similar characteristics IMO.
 

uniin

Gold Member
i'm so confused... can someone settle this for me?

i've heard the softer the wood (oak, maple) the better it is for lower tuning, and the harder the wood (birch, bubinga) the better it is for higher tuning..... so confused!!!
 

keep it simple

Platinum Member
i'm so confused... can someone settle this for me?

i've heard the softer the wood (oak, maple) the better it is for lower tuning, and the harder the wood (birch, bubinga) the better it is for higher tuning..... so confused!!!
There's much more than just hardness that dictates the sound of a wood species, & the fundamental tone of the shell has little to do with the drum's suitability for lower or higher tuning.

This is a good basic read: http://home.earthlink.net/~prof.sound/id14.html
 

tbdd

Senior Member
Thanks for that, I checked up a whole heap of companies and none of the ones i found do both. i really just want to hear each wood in say a 22x24 kick tuned the same just to hear the differance
 

Deltadrummer

Platinum Member
Mahogany is a very rare wood, and although it was a signature in hybrid drums of the 1950s, it is rarely used any more. I bet you would find it difficult to get a company to make you a mahogany shell in and of itself. My understanding is that the reason why we have bubinga today is that years ago Chinese companies planted the wood for future harvesting. Maybe in the future, mahogany will be available. They both produce great bass drums; there is nothing like a 24" mahogany bass drum though.
 
A

audiotech

Guest
I really like both mahogany or bubinga in drum shells. I was re-heading my bubinga kit this afternoon and the sound of those drums make my chest vibrate, lol. The mahogany and poplar shells with re-rings of my DW drums are very reminiscent of some of the 50s and 60s shells which I grew up playing and they never let me down. I really think that a mahogany/bubinga kit would tend to be a bit muddy, especially if not tuned properly. Just too much focus on the lower frequencies with not enough highs to bring out the attack of the drums.

Tama Starclassic Bubinga shells.



DW Classic shells.



Dennis
 

tbdd

Senior Member
do you no if they do the kick in a 24 diamter 22 deep and an 18" floor?
I love my dw maples but i am a craving fatter deeper sound
 
A

audiotech

Guest
do you no if they do the kick in a 24 diamter 22 deep and an 18" floor?
I love my dw maples but i am a craving fatter deeper sound
I'm not sure who "they" are. DW or Tama.

Dennis
 

Nuka

Senior Member
Jalepeno do bubinga I think.

They'll do anything though if you ask nicely xD

And their kits are beautiful in both looks and sound.
 
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keep it simple

Platinum Member
Mahogany is a very rare wood, and although it was a signature in hybrid drums of the 1950s, it is rarely used any more. I bet you would find it difficult to get a company to make you a mahogany shell in and of itself. My understanding is that the reason why we have bubinga today is that years ago Chinese companies planted the wood for future harvesting. Maybe in the future, mahogany will be available. They both produce great bass drums; there is nothing like a 24" mahogany bass drum though.
Ken, my prototype kit is made of mahogany http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h-CMAEiJ_os&feature=related but the boards came from 200+ year old church pews. Recycling is a great way to go. Not just in terms of environmental benefits, but also big sonic benefits too. You're right, good, old, slow grown mahogany (typically from the middle of a forrest, especially African) is super rare. Most of the mahogany available now is fast grown stuff and nowhere near as interesting as an instrument species.

Guru Drumworks would be happy to make anyone a mahogany kit of stave or steambent construction.
 

uniongoon

Gold Member
Okay, that last post made sense, because I did not think mahogany was rare at all. I recently scored a 100 year old mahogany bed I plan to build some stave drums out of. Yamaha's rock tour factory are harvesting their own forest in the Phillipines??? I think, and I guess it is the fast grown mass market variety.
Not sure if i posted these on this site, well good of place as any;




Stickers give a hint of the age of construction, this furniture builder ceased to exist around 1921
 
A

audiotech

Guest
do you no if they do the kick in a 24 diamter 22 deep and an 18" floor?
I love my dw maples but i am a craving fatter deeper sound
Yes and no. According to my book, the deepest full Bubinga bass drum is only an 18" with a 24" diameter. Tama does make 18" floor toms in 14" and 16" depths.

Dennis
 

Deltadrummer

Platinum Member
Ken, my prototype kit is made of mahogany http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h-CMAEiJ_os&feature=related but the boards came from 200+ year old church pews. Recycling is a great way to go. Not just in terms of environmental benefits, but also big sonic benefits too. You're right, good, old, slow grown mahogany (typically from the middle of a forest, especially African) is super rare. Most of the mahogany available now is fast grown stuff and nowhere near as interesting as an instrument species.

Guru Drumworks would be happy to make anyone a mahogany kit of stave or steambent construction.
Great to hear that. the Drums sound great!!. They have two hundred years of organ and choir vibrations to add. I want one.

A lot of the cheaper drums had Phillipian mahogany. Yamaha used to use it and now the Gretsch jazz kit has it. It's my understanding that n the 1940 - 50s, the mahogany came from America, and this was fine wood for the manufacture of instruments, furniture and church pews. Gretsch had a production of the Purewood series a few years back made from African Mahogany and they were beautiful. But I love my Tama B/B, hybrid and all.
 

keep it simple

Platinum Member
Great to hear that. the Drums sound great!!. They have two hundred years of organ and choir vibrations to add. I want one.

A lot of the cheaper drums had Phillipian mahogany. Yamaha used to use it and now the Gretsch jazz kit has it. It's my understanding that n the 1940 - 50s, the mahogany came from America, and this was fine wood for the manufacture of instruments, furniture and church pews. Gretsch had a production of the Purewood series a few years back made from African Mahogany and they were beautiful. But I love my Tama B/B, hybrid and all.
Good info Ken, & yes, your B/B sounds great!

Okay, that last post made sense, because I did not think mahogany was rare at all. I recently scored a 100 year old mahogany bed I plan to build some stave drums out of. Yamaha's rock tour factory are harvesting their own forest in the Phillipines??? I think, and I guess it is the fast grown mass market variety.
Not sure if i posted these on this site, well good of place as any;
Yeah, that's the way to do it! Don't those boards just look the business cleaned up. Many pass by pieces of wood like this. Years of varnish & other treatments make the wood look like cheap crap, whereas underneath = whoohooo! If you were to buy boards of that quality from a specialist supplier, they'd cost you a fortune. Nice find!


Garage sales & general furniture auctions are great sources of beautiful timber, especially in the UK. What's termed as "brown furniture" is very unpopular, & it's quite common to find 200-300 year old wide board tables going for close to nothing. A friend of mine picked up an 18th century damaged 10ft long table at auction a few weeks ago. He paid £20 ($30) for it, & underneath all the crap, it's bookmatched flame mahogany!!! Enough to make a nice 4 piece kit. From a specialist supplier, you'd be paying 20x that price, & it wouldn't come close to the quality. Flame mahogany dammit! Have you guys any idea just how stunning that would look formed into steambent shells? I think I need a private moment, lol!
 
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