Do Some Parts Always Remain a Physical Challenge? Separate Ways & American Band

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
Well I guess I've been playing it wrong this whole time lol.

On 2nd thought, perhaps I am playing it right and I'm just thinking they're trips when they really aren't.

I prefer the 2nd scenario :)
 

IDDrummer

Platinum Member
executing it clean and in time.
The bold italics are mine, because that is the part I had trouble with. I found the fill fairly easy to play, but somewhat difficult to do without changing the tempo during it. Metronome practice!
 

PorkPieGuy

Platinum Member
Learn the lick(s) perfectly really, really slow and then speed them up over time would be the only things I can suggest. Also, I'm sure there are some YouTube instructional videos or drum covers that could help.
 

2bsticks

Platinum Member
The actual pattern for American Band is easy, the challenge is executing it clean and in time. At least for me anyway!!
 

TripleStroke

Senior Member
That American band songs intro seems pretty simple to me... not even being cocky or anything. Its one of those momentum/pedal reactionary-based fill, which ive always practiced growing up. Hm perhaps i shall try this fill and record it

As for me, i have hard time pulling off the infamous moby dick/paradise city "Bonham triplet" fill. Practice eventually get it done but even sometimes now and then i will have difficulty pulling it off on the spot at any given moment. Something to def keep working on as i wanna be able to do it anywhere any time
 

ineedaclutch

Platinum Member
The way that the American Band intro is written in the OP...I want to say the part in question is properly played as triplets, not 16ths. I could be wrong, but this was kind of glaring to me...unless I am mistaken and they aren't trips. I think they are though. I count the part in question:

1-trip-let / 2-trip-let / 3-trip-let / 4-trip-let / 5-trip-let/

1-trip-let / 2-trip-let / 3-trip-let / 4-trip-let /5 - and /

Clarification anyone?
I think it may be because of the phrasing. They are 16th, but since they are in groups of three, hands+ kick+ kick, you may be tricking yourself into thinking they are triplets.
 

IDDrummer

Platinum Member
The way that the American Band intro is written in the OP...I want to say the part in question is properly played as triplets, not 16ths. I could be wrong, but this was kind of glaring to me...unless I am mistaken and they aren't trips. I think they are though. I count the part in question:

1-trip-let / 2-trip-let / 3-trip-let / 4-trip-let / 5-trip-let/

1-trip-let / 2-trip-let / 3-trip-let / 4-trip-let /5 - and /

Clarification anyone?
I'm pretty sure they are 16ths, Lar.
 

newoldie

Silver Member
The way that the American Band intro is written in the OP...I want to say the part in question is properly played as triplets, not 16ths. I could be wrong, but this was kind of glaring to me...unless I am mistaken and they aren't trips. I think they are though. I count the part in question:

1-trip-let / 2-trip-let / 3-trip-let / 4-trip-let / 5-trip-let/

1-trip-let / 2-trip-let / 3-trip-let / 4-trip-let /5 - and /

Clarification anyone?
I've always heard that intro as 16th notes w/flams as shown. If you slow it down you should hear the same.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
The way that the American Band intro is written in the OP...I want to say the part in question is properly played as triplets, not 16ths. I could be wrong, but this was kind of glaring to me...unless I am mistaken and they aren't trips. I think they are though. I count the part in question:

1-trip-let / 2-trip-let / 3-trip-let / 4-trip-let / 5-trip-let/

1-trip-let / 2-trip-let / 3-trip-let / 4-trip-let /5 - and /

Clarification anyone?
 

DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
Speaking of Journey, I caught part of a set by a Journey tribute band summer before last. They're supposed to the best Journey tribute band in my area, and I see that they have tons of gigs lined up, so people dig them.

But it drove me nuts how drummer didn't play the parts like either the record or the live albums. Not that he butchered the songs, or played anything "wrong" for the music, it just it wasn't the parts I was expecting to hear from a band claiming to be a sound alike.

But judging by the size of the crowd, I was clearly the only one bugged by it. lol
 

Dr_Watso

Platinum Member
Those aren't that hard, and you can do them if you put some work in. Just sayin.

Especially the kick doubles one, you MUST slow way down and get the muscle memory going.

You stated you'll never be able to do this, and that's both un-true and detrimental to yourself. It might take more work than you're willing to put in, but if you put that work in, I promise, this will no longer be a physical challenge and you'll be onto the next "impossible" challenges.

One of the coolest parts about growing as a musician is times like when an old favorite song comes on the radio and you go "holy crap, that sounds like something I could play! ... Couldn't say that a year ago!"
 

DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
Are there some parts that you play that are always a physical challenge regardless of many times you've practiced them?
Despite my answers above, to the actual question yes.

Knowing how it's supposed to be played, and doing it right are two different things.

And as mentioned, drums being buried in the mix, or no definition between toms on many older records can make it difficult to know what is "right".
 

DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
One that sticks in my craw is Led Zep Rock and Roll. It's not the speed, but the feel of it, and I have refused to put it in sets before, because the intro is so iconic, if I can't play it right, I don't want to do it at all.

I agree, the feel is difficult, but if you think of the 1st note of the fill as a rest, with the first note played as the upbeat, it helps.
 

DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
.

The Separate Ways fill is really buried in the mix. I just play what I assume is three and 2/3 triplets using the double bass.
It's actually not a double bass fill, though it may be easier to play that way.

It's just an unusual phrasing, which makes it difficult to play properly.


I remember asking Steve about this many, many, many years ago at a clinic, and he said it was one of the few songs he played the same way every night.
 
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