do drum teachers have drum teachers?

zakhopper316

Silver Member
today as i was playing i was thinking about my progress as drummer and really realized what
an asset drum teachers are, especially the great ones. and i decided that i will probably have a
drum teacher for as long as i play, and it got me to thinking, if even the most advanced guys on here
still have a teacher? and if not at what point and why did u decide to stop studying under someone?
i think that everyone should have an instructor, even the most advanced professional drummers,
if not to learn things from them, then to at least have someone who knows what they are talking about
give you advice and an opinion on your playing

so who has one, who does not and why?

after all therapists have therapists!
 

Eggman

Member
My first drum teacher, the one who taught me how to play drums years back, said that his job as a teacher was to put himself out of a job. He wanted me to learn enough from him that I could pick up any song or drum book on my own and be able to teach myself how to play it. I think that's why you'll find most advanced drummers don't take regular lessons - they already know what they have to do to learn something new, it's just a matter of putting in the time to learn it.

Now, that's not to say advanced drummers won't ever take a lesson from another drummer. Many great drummers have gone back to taking lessons to pick up new techniques or learn new styles. Even if they're not taking formal lessons, they probably know other drummers who they can hang out with, trade grooves/licks, and get feedback from.
 

zakhopper316

Silver Member
My first drum teacher, the one who taught me how to play drums years back, said that his job as a teacher was to put himself out of a job. He wanted me to learn enough from him that I could pick up any song or drum book on my own and be able to teach myself how to play it. I think that's why you'll find most advanced drummers don't take regular lessons - they already know what they have to do to learn something new, it's just a matter of putting in the time to learn it.

Now, that's not to say advanced drummers won't ever take a lesson from another drummer. Many great drummers have gone back to taking lessons to pick up new techniques or learn new styles. Even if they're not taking formal lessons, they probably know other drummers who they can hang out with, trade grooves/licks, and get feedback from.
interesting, you are right tho i could learn any thing from a book and be completely competent with it, and i consider myself an advanced player, my drum teacher is actually my professor from the drum collective. i dont really learn that much, some times we just jam together, but i like it, and sometimes he points out thing for me to fix.
 

DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
Some do, some don't.

Many great players understand the more you know, the more you realize how much there is to learn.

I know Gregg Bissonette has students, and he took lessons from Tony Williams. I stumbled up on a Tony Williams interview from before his death, and he was discussing how HE was taking lessons from someone else.

Not long ago, Neil Peart said in an interview he had recently taken some lessons from Peter Erskine. (Neil doesn't teach, but hey, he's made instructional videos)

I've taught lessons in then past, and then went and got lessons from someone else on more advanced topics.

No one person can do it all, so there is always something to learn if you're willing to do it.
 

thedrumninja

Senior Member
Dave Weckl is an educator/clinician (not sure if he teaches privates) and he re-invented his technique with the help of Freddie Gruber.

A lot of the leading educators are friends, work together in schools and universities and share ideas when they hang and talk drums. It may not be a formal setting but it still has the same positive effect on your overall playing. Joe Porcaro has been around a long time and is a well known educator and he has benefited from knowing and working with Ralph Humphrey at LAMA.

Wether they have a teacher or not, they never stop learning or asking questions.
 

Living Dead Drummer

Platinum Member
I good teacher will always be the best tool for you to use.
I have been teaching private lessons for around 9 years now, and up until I moved to LA last year I was still taking lessons with the same teacher I have had since I was 13.
 

jeffwj

Platinum Member
Yes - I still study with Steve Fidyk a few times a year. It would be more if we both weren't busy and if it were a closer drive (it's two and a half hour drive).

Jeff
 

shadowlorde

Senior Member
depends on the person .. i give some drum lessons don't currently take any .. not because I don't want to .. it's just not in the budget currently.
 

LilMan-Mike

Junior Member
My drum teacher has been doing lessons with Bob Armstrong (he also taught Steve White!) since he was 12 and is still taking lessons with him now and he has been teaching for 10 years
 
W

wy yung

Guest
I still take lessons. I have found that the lessons have changed and cover more conceptual areas than before. Often it is simply a talk.
 

Bart Elliott

DW PRO DRUMMER
Absolutely YES!

A great drum teacher is a student of drumming and continues to learn until they die. If you are considering to study with someone who doesn't continue their own studies, I would personally not take lessons from them.

Every professional, whether it be a doctor, lawyer, or musician, continues to study and learn. This is what keeps them current and fresh. If they don't, then they won't be a professional for long.

Not all professional teachers are continuing to study and learn from another master teacher on a regular basis, but they do have peers with which they exchange ideas and continue to learn. Going to masterclasses, clinics, festivals, etc., are all great ways to add to your learning.
 
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