Desert Island drum books

MrTheOne

Member
Ok, recently I bought my first ever copy of Stick Control (playing 25 years never owned a copy, ha!). It’s one of the “must haves” from what I’ve seen so it made me wonder what the other must have books are, the three you’d have on a desert island if you HAD to pick only those three?
Which, I suppose is a fanciful way of asking which ones should I buy if I don’t want to buy every drum book out there. But the desert island question is a little more fun.
 

Drifter in the Dark

Silver Member
Aside from Stick Control, I would probably pick..
-The Drummer's Complete Vocabulary (Alan Dawson / Jon Ramsey)*
-Syncopation (Ted Reed)*
-Advanced Funk Studies (Rick Latham)

*This combo is especially good because a lot of Alan Dawson's exercises are based on the material in Syncopation. In this way, the books function as companion pieces.
 

DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
I think all one needs is Stick Control and Ted Reed's syncopation, and an open mind.

Most other books are showing you how to apply the first two books.

Even when I was at PIT way back when, despite the number of books we were assigned, we spent the majority of time working on those two books.
 

Odd-Arne Oseberg

Platinum Member
As I see it I can write down a few reading pages and patterns for myself, so I would not bring stuff like DC, NB or Syncopation.

#1 then would be All American Drummer.

#2 The Compleat Jazz drummer.

#3 Universal Rhythms for Drumset.

If I could bring more, then I'd bring all the Chaffee stuff.
 

force3005

Silver Member
Hi MrTO. My first book would be Beats and Variations for Dance Band Drummers by Joel Rothman. From Viennese Waltz, Jewish & Greek beats to Afro Cuban beats and everything in between for the working drummer.

My second book would be Mel Bay's Fusion Drum Styles by James Morton. This book works your kick drum foot and left hand. It also helps with timing with all of your limbs where each lands in a measure.

Last is Mel Bay's The Key to Drum Polyrhythms by Chuck Kerrigan. This one breaks down polyrhythms in a easy way and showing the basic formula that works for all. After learning that it evens makes playing odd time easier IMO.
 
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notvinnie

Senior Member
 

Odd-Arne Oseberg

Platinum Member
I guess this would be your #4 then?

coconut.jpg
 

MrTheOne

Member
I’ll have to check out all the recommendations. I have Advanced Funk Studies and The Art of Bop Drumming. I bought AoBD at a time when I still wanted to play jazz mostly. Not so much anymore but I still like working out if it, I feel like the jazz vocabulary and approach helps drummer develop in some important ways. Think I might pick up The New Breed too. Last teacher I had was working out of that one with me.
 

MrTheOne

Member
Hi MrTO. My first book would be Beats and Variations for Dance Band Drummers by Joel Rothman. From Viennese Waltz, Jewish & Greek beats to Afro Cuban beats and everything in between for the working drummer.

My second book would be Mel Bay's Fusion Drum Styles by James Morton. This book works your kick drum foot and left hand. It also helps with timing with all of your limbs where each lands in a measure.

Last is Mel Bay's The Key to Drum Polyrhythms by Chuck Kerrigan. This one breaks down polyrhythms in a easy way and showing the basic formula that works for all. After learning that it evens makes playing odd time easier IMO.
I’m definitely interested in your first suggestion the most. I get bored with the standard 2&4 at times. Of course it’s the most conventionally appropriate for the band I’m in (blues/blues-rock),but I feel like some different styles of beats might help propel some creativity.
 
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