Decisions decisions!

keep it simple

Platinum Member
Ok, this is a vote on what Andy should do now thread :)

This is my predicament. We've just sold the 6 piece satinwood show kit that I've been using for gigs recently. We (carefully) gig our show/display/demo kits to get exposure, but also to field test them to search for ongoing improvements. Selling our ex demo/show stock is something we need to do. Customers expect to see new stuff in consecutive shows, plus we need to make room for a new series coming along this summer.

Anyhow, this leaves me with two gigging kit options. I'm used to gigging a 6 piece in my band, and I really do use it's full potential in a melodic setting. The fills I deploy are an integral part of our arrangements, & require 4 toms. Of course, I can transpose those fills to a 4 piece, but it's not the same, & requires a bit of on the fly thinking.

The only 6 piece I have available to me is my Spaun maple. A good kit, & easily up to the job (even if it doesn't sound the same as a Guru). The other option is to gig the Guru classic 4 piece (cappuccino) c/w 20" x 12" bass drum (should be interesting in a big rock setting).

Gigging the Spaun is the easy choice. Gigging the little Guru demands more of me, & more of the kit. Which way should I go on this?
 

Pollyanna

Platinum Member
Would I be right in saying there's a conflict of interest? It would seem that the Spaun, being a larger kit with a bigger bass drum, is better suited to the classic rock the band plays, but that means you don't get to road test the Gurus.

If it was me, I'd play the Gurus with extra Spaun toms but I'm not sure you're as keen on Frankensteins as I am.
 

Mad About Drums

Pollyanna's Agent
The Spaun has a proven track record with "Fired Up", so it makes the obvious choice...

... but, the cappucino makes it for an experience in a rock setting, it's size suggest it's not up to the task, but I beg to differ, I certainly don't have reservations about the tom & the floor tom, with the right heads on them they'll be up to the task with brilliant results, the real challenge is for the bass drum, 20 x 12 is indeed a small sized bass drum in a rock setting, and it would be interesting to see how it performs in such a context, not accounting for the potential drummers in the audience falling in love with this splendid little gem.

I would at least give the Guru classic some try for a few gigs to see how it performs, I bare in mind the melodic approach you required in the band, but it's not something that cannot be adapted for the circumstances Andy, and makes it for a challenge somehow...

Alternatively, you might want to consider an hybrid kit, the cappucino's bass drum & the Spaun's toms & floor tom, that's another option.

I would love to hear the classic serie in a rock setting, and I'm sure it can deliver the goods in a true Bonham's style, all you have to do is to practice those Bonzo patterns & licks :)
 

keep it simple

Platinum Member
Would I be right in saying there's a conflict of interest? It would seem that the Spaun, being a larger kit with a bigger bass drum, is better suited to the classic rock the band plays, but that means you don't get to road test the Gurus.

If it was me, I'd play the Gurus with extra Spaun toms but I'm not sure you're as keen on Frankensteins as I am.
Yes, there is a conflict of interests, both in terms of what's right for the gig, & conversely, what I should be doing re: my position in Guru. The Frankenstein option doesn't tick the Guru responsibility box :(

The Spaun has a proven track record with "Fired Up", so it makes the obvious choice...

... but, the cappucino makes it for an experience in a rock setting, it's size suggest it's not up to the task, but I beg to differ, I certainly don't have reservations about the tom & the floor tom, with the right heads on them they'll be up to the task with brilliant results, the real challenge is for the bass drum, 20 x 12 is indeed a small sized bass drum in a rock setting, and it would be interesting to see how it performs in such a context, not accounting for the potential drummers in the audience falling in love with this splendid little gem.

I would at least give the Guru classic some try for a few gigs to see how it performs, I bare in mind the melodic approach you required in the band, but it's not something that cannot be adapted for the circumstances Andy, and makes it for a challenge somehow...

Alternatively, you might want to consider an hybrid kit, the cappucino's bass drum & the Spaun's toms & floor tom, that's another option.

I would love to hear the classic serie in a rock setting, and I'm sure it can deliver the goods in a true Bonham's style, all you have to do is to practice those Bonzo patterns & licks :)
Yes, it's a tough one Henri. The Classic series is absolutely a great choice for rock music, but in these small sizes, & fitted with wood hoops, it shouldn't really work - or will it? There's only one way to find out really :)

Transposing key parts is a challenge, but nothing I can't handle. There is a hardware issue too, but again, I can equip the little Classic kit using stands instead of my usual gigging rack. The Spaun remains the easy choice though.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
I have no doubt that the 20" Guru bass drum is up to the task. You mic on every gig, right? The big question is the 2 missing toms. You have your Spaun set with the rack and I'm sure you're very comfortable with that. So to me your Guru choices are to do the 4 piece, or alternatively, don't you have any more Guru toms lying about that you could use to augment the 4 piece? If it doesn't match, but they're all Guru, would you do that?

At your gigs....I mean how many people really know that you are a founding father of a new drum brand? It's not like you're taking orders at gigs. Do you push your kit at gigs over the mics? I kind of assumed that the Satinwood kit was your gigging kit, I'm surprised you sold it. You need a dedicated Guru gigging set. One that you don't sell lol. Until then, I would be trying to piece together a Guru kit, it kind of is your responsibility. But if it really cramps your style with a 4 piece or assaults your visual sensibilities with a mismatched Guru set, then I don't see much harm in using the Spauns. It's only temporary.

I think you should give the 4 piece a try first. What's the worst that can happen lol?

It is kind of ironic that the owner of a drum company is short on his own drums lol.
 

Pocket-full-of-gold

Platinum Member
I'd do what needed to be done to get the job done to the best of my ability, mate. In a perfect world, that would tick the Guru box as well. Alas, the world is far from perfect......and you've got a paying gig to do.

You need a dedicated Guru gigging set.
If you're not comfortable wearing two hats, you're gonna have to. No way round it.

In the meantime, how good is Dean at turning a blind eye?.
 

wildbill

Platinum Member
Make some wood hoops for a set of roto-toms that match your Classic kit.



(just anoutside the box, brainstorming idea - LOL)
 

StickIt

Senior Member
FWIW, I would gig the Gurus, for two reasons. One, it would give you a reason to get a little more creative with your drumming...using the musicality of the 4 piece to pull out sounds that you are used to having automatically available via the extra toms. And 2, to showcase the kit.

I would at least give it a shot on a couple of gigs, and if it just wasn't working out in the band situation, pull out the Spauns. But...I bet it will.
 

Mad About Drums

Pollyanna's Agent
There's only one way to find out really :)
That's the best option in my book... you then take it from there Andy.

Why am I more confident on the little cappuccino than you are Andy? There's only one way to find out ...

Is this thread gonna turn into a Harry Hill's TV Burp type of scenario? ;-)
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
Plus the Spauns...you've been there done that. Why not shake it up a bit and give the small kit a spin. You never know, you might enjoy it more then you anticipate. Live a little!
 
T

The Old Hyde

Guest
Dude, thats like the owner of a Ford dealership driving around in a Chevy. You need to play Gurus, PERIOD!!!! You are a talented drummer and I cant imaging you being a slave to 4 toms because of certain fills. I know you can play it on a 4 piece and it will come off fine, hit near the edge and accent as you go towards the middle of your mounted tom and you will sound like your playing more toms.
 
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sonnygrabber

Senior Member
Gonna have to echo everyone else here. Go Guru or go home. In fact I'm stunned you would even consider the 'other' kit...

Challenge yourself! Years ago I went to a four piece out of laziness, and I'm pretty sure I'll not go back because I can pull so many sounds out of those four pieces now. I have to to be honest. You will get to KNOW those drums, when to hit them in the centre, when to hit them closer to the edge, and when to smash the living besuvious outta them.
 
FWIW, I would gig the Gurus, for two reasons. One, it would give you a reason to get a little more creative with your drumming...using the musicality of the 4 piece to pull out sounds that you are used to having automatically available via the extra toms. And 2, to showcase the kit.

I would at least give it a shot on a couple of gigs, and if it just wasn't working out in the band situation, pull out the Spauns. But...I bet it will.
My thoughts exactly.
 

DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
I thought you sold the Spaun.

And as I said when you considering selling the Spauns, you can't represent one company and be seen with another. This shouldn't even be a question.

I mean, imagine if Vinnie Colaiuta was seen playing Paiste instead of Zildjian.....oh wait....
 

eclipseownzu

Gold Member
I think when choosing gear it is important to remember that the crowd has expectations when they go see a band play. Often times they are not even aware that they have these expectations, and will usually claim that they do not have them when asked. They are there however, and they must be taken into account when setting up a SHOW. Because that is what a cover band puts on, a SHOW.

That being said, showing up to play classic rock tunes with a 4 pice kit and a 20" bass drum doesnt meet those expectations. Even the non drummers who may not know otherwise are expecting the drums to have a certain look.

All that being said I would use the Spaun's until a suitable Guru becomes available. I know that many on the forum will disagree with my logic, but there is a reason why certain drummers in certain bands use the equipment they do.
 

8Mile

Platinum Member
I'll be the dissenting voice here: Use the Spauns!

As you said, it's easier, and Andy, it's not like you don't have enough on your plate right now. You're a busy guy. Push the easy button!
 

bigiainw

Gold Member
nah, you need a Mapex Saturn kit.......


:)
That's what I do!

Anyhow, following on from my 4 piece foray a couple of weeks ago, I would go the 4 piece route. It is liberating once you get used to it. If your worried about volume, you could always close mic all 4 drums rather than your usual set up. Plus, as others have said, free advertising, and you do need to be seen to practice what you preach!

The danger might be that you'll try it and never want to play 6 drums ever again....
 

Dirtysticks

Senior Member
I would play a 4 pc with a side snare. It isn't too hard to improvise and sound good on a 4pc. I usually play a 5pc, but at smaller gigs, I use a 4pc and it isn't hard or too much of an adjustment.
 

aydee

Platinum Member
Ok, this is a vote on what Andy should do now thread :)

This is my predicament. We've just sold the 6 piece satinwood show kit that I've been using for gigs recently. We (carefully) gig our show/display/demo kits to get exposure, but also to field test them to search for ongoing improvements. Selling our ex demo/show stock is something we need to do. Customers expect to see new stuff in consecutive shows, plus we need to make room for a new series coming along this summer.

Anyhow, this leaves me with two gigging kit options. I'm used to gigging a 6 piece in my band, and I really do use it's full potential in a melodic setting. The fills I deploy are an integral part of our arrangements, & require 4 toms. Of course, I can transpose those fills to a 4 piece, but it's not the same, & requires a bit of on the fly thinking.

The only 6 piece I have available to me is my Spaun maple. A good kit, & easily up to the job (even if it doesn't sound the same as a Guru). The other option is to gig the Guru classic 4 piece (cappuccino) c/w 20" x 12" bass drum (should be interesting in a big rock setting).

Gigging the Spaun is the easy choice. Gigging the little Guru demands more of me, & more of the kit. Which way should I go on this?
How could you possibly consider driving your old Volvo again after zipping around in a Lambourghini Diablo?


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