Cymbal Angles !!

SharkyBait911

Senior Member
Hey drummerworld fans!

Well it is a very personal thing, i have mine at just under 90 degrees but my friend has his actualli facing away from him?!?!
He says he gets a better response from the cymbal that way but i say you cant get the range of sounds if you dont have it facing towards you !!

Anywai i thought id better get your opions on it and have a nice big thread to advise others on it !!

Cheers once again,
 

eddiehimself

Platinum Member
Sounds like a great way to break your cymbals to me. The idea of whacking the stick straight on the flat cymbal somehow "improving the response" is just pretty silly. Yes, it's a lot easier to hit like that but you'll actually find the cymbals open up better when you hit it on an angle with a nice sweeping motion.
 

bobdadruma

Platinum Member
Never Never Never Never Never Nver Never, ETC, Hit a cymbal dead on at the edge like your friend is doing!!!!!!!!!!!!
For best sound a cymbal should be played in the middle or thereabouts.
If you do that with a high end pie you will wind up with b20 bronze scrap metal.
 
A

audiotech

Guest
Your friend must have stock in both a cymbal company and a stick company. That's ludicrous.

Although the first picture is a bit exaggerated because of the camera angle and focal length of the lens, you can see that all my cymbals tip towards me. They are struck with a sweeping motion, not hammered upon as if I'm driving a nail.





Dennis
 

bobdadruma

Platinum Member
Beautiful Tama kit audiotech! I just bought an early edition Stagestar with the 18" bass drum in red.
These low cost entry level kits are coveted by jazzers for the tuning range. I can't believe the sound of the toms and the small bass!
 
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eddiehimself

Platinum Member
Beautiful Tama kit audiotech! I just bought an early edition Stagestar with the 18" bass drum in red.
These low cost entry level kits are coveted by jazzers for the tuning range. I can't believe the sound of the toms and the small bass!
Have you not seen it? There's actually a running thing on DW, see how many times you can spot a new place that audiotech has decided to post his kit in a day or whatever. It is a nice kit though, even if it is slightly overexposed :p
 

Derek

Silver Member
Hey drummerworld fans!

Well it is a very personal thing, i have mine at just under 90 degrees but my friend has his actualli facing away from him?!?!
He says he gets a better response from the cymbal that way but i say you cant get the range of sounds if you dont have it facing towards you !!

Anywai i thought id better get your opions on it and have a nice big thread to advise others on it !!

Cheers once again,
For me pretty much the same angle as my toms. Slightly toward me.
 
A

audiotech

Guest
Have you not seen it? There's actually a running thing on DW, see how many times you can spot a new place that audiotech has decided to post his kit in a day or whatever. It is a nice kit though, even if it is slightly overexposed :p
I hope I didn't hurt your feelings, lol. If someone has a question concerning any part of a drum kit that I may have pictures of, I'm privileged to show them. Maybe the thread starter never seen them. If you would like, I could share my cymbal arrangement that I use on my Yamaha Maple Custom Absolute kit. They're tilted pretty much the same.





Oops, I forgot about my Gretsch Renowns. Again a very similar set-up with my cymbals tilted towards the operator.





Here's my 5 piece 1965 "vintage" Pearl kit. Again I like to keep the cymbals positioned the same way.





I would show you my studio kits, but that's where they are and I have no photos at this time. They too have the same set up, cymbal wise. I hope I didn't take the wind out of the "running thing" here on DW. By the way,we would be very happy to see your kits eddiehimself, you see, I don't believe I've ever had that opportunity and I love looking at other people's kits too.

Oh, I don't believe that any of my photographs are over exposed. Very good highlight and shadow detail exists in each photo, lol.

All in good fun.
Dennis
 

Pocket-full-of-gold

Platinum Member
I have always....and always will (I think)....have my cymbals flat. It's not an asthetics thing...nor am I trying to emulate the latest trend (been playing since the late 80's). It's purely the way I prefer them (as do many others...check Karl Crafton's kits...check KIS's kit....I'm not alone here).....that said, I'm not a 'basher' either. My whole drumming life (20 yrs) I've broken one cymbal (a Zildjian A, THIN crash)....poor cymbal choice on my behalf, rather than poor technique (have to add that b4 I get jumped on).

But the reason I choose flat is because I like the way they 'open up' when being struck on the side. It's purely a personal choice. I guess I just resent the whole 'if you've got flat cymbals, you've got bad technique' argument......often, perhaps....but NOT always.
 

JT1

Silver Member
Sounds like a great way to break your cymbals to me. The idea of whacking the stick straight on the flat cymbal somehow "improving the response" is just pretty silly. Yes, it's a lot easier to hit like that but you'll actually find the cymbals open up better when you hit it on an angle with a nice sweeping motion.
I've just discovered this and yep correct! It's what i do now. Angled slightly towards you is the way to go!
 

eddiehimself

Platinum Member
I would show you my studio kits, but that's where they are and I have no photos at this time. They too have the same set up, cymbal wise. I hope I didn't take the wind out of the "running thing" here on DW. By the way,we would be very happy to see your kits eddiehimself, you see, I don't believe I've ever had that opportunity and I love looking at other people's kits too.

Oh, I don't believe that any of my photographs are over exposed. Very good highlight and shadow detail exists in each photo, lol.

All in good fun.
Dennis
Oh no i didn't mean anything bad by it, i enjoy looking at your kit. Okay here is a very underexposed shot of my kit:



I suppose i could post a pic of it if someone asked about putting their own wraps on their kit lol.
 

Pollyanna

Platinum Member
I have a constant conundrum with my crashride. If it's too flat then it's hard to ride. If the angle is too steep then it's hard to crash. Guess I'm always looking for baby bear :)

Pocket, if your cymbals are flat would that mean you have to lift your arm up a bit higher to open them up than if they had a bit of tilt? Not bagging, just curious.

Eddie, here's a less underexposed pic of your kit

 
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Pocket-full-of-gold

Platinum Member
Pocket, if your cymbals are flat would that mean you have to lift your arm up a bit higher to open them up than if they had a bit of tilt? Not bagging, just curious.
Always happy to get bagged Poll.....just thought I'd throw my disclaimers in so it didn't turn into a 'technique' argument. I'm no brilliant drummer by any means, but I've been playing long enough to know my preferred set up.

Nah, I set 'em at around eye level when I'm sitting at the kit, so my hand will seldom go above shoulder height for a cymbal strike with the shoulder of the stick and I can still play the bow of the cymbal with the tips for quieter or more delicate stuff. Ride is low and flat also. I seldom crash my ride and seldom use the bell on my crashes, so for what I do the set up works.
 

Pollyanna

Platinum Member
Nah, I set 'em at around eye level when I'm sitting at the kit, so my hand will seldom go above shoulder height for a cymbal strike with the shoulder of the stick and I can still play the bow of the cymbal with the tips for quieter or more delicate stuff. Ride is low and flat also. I seldom crash my ride and seldom use the bell on my crashes, so for what I do the set up works.
Okay, thanks Pocket. That makes sense. Not many drummers do a lot of playing on the bell of their crashes anyway as far as I can tell; the ride's bell is cleaner. Bummer if you hit the rim, though.

I'm thinking of getting a crash instead the splash. Crashing a 17" crash ride in low volume music is risky and sometimes a splash isn't the answer.
 

joeysnare

Silver Member
i actually do use the bell of my 16" aax explosion crash often it has a great ping with a sort of trashy china undertone, really unique sound that i love. BTW audiotech can i come stay at your house (drools) my god all those kits to play on....i could only dream...lol
 

Funky Crêpe

Silver Member
Sounds like a great way to break your cymbals to me. The idea of whacking the stick straight on the flat cymbal somehow "improving the response" is just pretty silly. Yes, it's a lot easier to hit like that but you'll actually find the cymbals open up better when you hit it on an angle with a nice sweeping motion.
your talking about a crash cymbal right? if not you got it wrong buddy!
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
My crashes are flat too. I have better control of them that way, it's consistent for me. The Ride is tilted toward me slightly. To each their own
 

Pocket-full-of-gold

Platinum Member
My crashes are flat too. I have better control of them that way, it's consistent for me. The Ride is tilted toward me slightly. To each their own
Indeed Larry. And many of us do it, yet it still seems to draw the absolute ire of a few. I just feel that the 'bad technique' thing gets thrown around as a first answer to flat cymbals waaaaay to often. If you're breaking 'em all the time, then it should be looked at, but if you prefer it that way and your gear is still in good order. What's the problem?

As I stated earlier, sometimes it may come down to bad technique....but not always.
 

eddiehimself

Platinum Member
your talking about a crash cymbal right? if not you got it wrong buddy!
yes i was on about a crash cymbal. And i'm speaking from an experience.

Also i think that probably the angle at which you hit the stick on the cymbal is what matters, having cymbals angled towards you can help with that but it's not always nesecarry.
 
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