Correct sticking for portraits in rythym

toddbishop

Platinum Member
Mostly alternating. There are very few rudimental stickings anywhere in the book-- no paradiddles or rhythms sticked as doubles. On p. 12 you have to play some flam taps. I worked through that book with Charles Dowd, who learned it from Cirone, and I didn't understand the reason for some of his stickings. Often repeated ruffs or flams would be played non-alternating, especially if they were very loud or very soft-- also very soft singles. There are probably some spots where you need to start with a certain hand to make a passage easier to execute. And some very fast, quiet passages may use natural sticking-- with the R hand on the strong side of the rhythm, and the L hand on the off side notes. The overall logic seems to be to make things easier to play with musical phrasing and a consistent sound.
 

toddbishop

Platinum Member
Mostly alternating. There are very few rudimental stickings anywhere in the book-- no paradiddles or rhythms sticked as doubles. On p. 12 you have to play some flam taps. I worked through that book with Charles Dowd, who learned it from Cirone, and I didn't understand the reason for some of his stickings. Often repeated ruffs or flams would be played non-alternating, especially if they were very loud or very soft-- also very soft singles. There are probably some spots where you need to start with a certain hand to make a passage easier to execute. And some very fast, quiet passages may use natural sticking-- with the R hand on the strong side of the rhythm, and the L hand on the off side notes. The overall logic seems to be to make things easier to play with musical phrasing and a consistent sound.

Oh: All rolls are multiple-bounce; three stroke ruffs are played with a multiple-bounce stroke and a tap; four-stroke ruffs are played as alternating singles. On page 22 there are some 5 and 7 stroke rolls written with ruff-type notation-- those are played as normal multiple bounce 5s and 7s.
 

pgm554

Platinum Member
I studied with Jack van Geem who played with Cirone in the SF Symphony and part of the logic in some orchestral sticking is for evenness and tone.

The funny thing is Jack used Mo Goldbergs book to teach out of rather than Tony's.

A drumstick may be of a different weight than its mate causing a pitch difference in the rhythmic passages.

Generally speaking ,the conductor doesn't give a rats butt how it's sticked,but does care about evenness and tone.
 
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toddbishop

Platinum Member
We also did Goldenberg-- it's probably more useful. PIR is ridiculously dense and I haven't touched it in years. I actually like Mitchell Peters's intermediate book more than all of them for general reading and facility.
 
If I remember correctly(I studied out of this book in 1976....), right hand lead was the rule but that's about all I remember from studying that book.
 
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