Comparing oneself to others (drummers)

GeoB

Gold Member
I can play Doug Clifford stuff!

Meat and Potato's is a compliment in my book. Simple works.
 

philrudd

Senior Member
....or you could look at it like I would and walk around thinking, "God I'm so glad I don't have to do that anymore...where were those bacon wrapped twinkies again?" ;)

It is human nature to compare yourself, and over time you just learn that everybody has something to offer and you're not as great as you thought you were (which will prompt you to either give it up, or get better, your choice). Now that I'm in my late 40s soon-to-be-50s, I'll admit it took me a long time to get comfortable in my own skin (although friends have said I've been that way for a long time - not sure who they're talking about), but I like watching other drummers now and seeing what they have going on, and if they're doing what the music asks, who's to say I could do that better? I can only do what I do and I'm the guy who has to look in the mirror every morning, so if I'm happy with that, there you go.

I've very much become the older gentleman you spoke of just layin' it down with the band. In my 20s,.... not so much ;)
I could have written this post myself. Well stated, Mr. Eder. It describes my feelings about this to a T.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
The drummer plays no fills. He is rock solid in the pocket. He isn't playing anything a first year player couldn't handle technically.
This raises a great point. I totally agree, that technically, a first year player has the physical skills to do this stuff. However, from what I see, mentally, a first year male player.... isn't nearly secure enough, or has a quiet enough mind, to play bare minimal.

The thing is....bare minimal is about the best sound you can strive for, with this type of music. It's crazy counter-intuitive. It's backwards. Generally speaking, first year male drummers have to play fast, with lots of impressive fills, try waaaaay too hard, and generally fail for many years before the mental pre-conceptions start to fall away. It takes a fair amount of security to realize that....YOU DON'T HAVE TO WORK THAT HARD! First year drummers....it takes some time to arrive at this conclusion. This doesn't apply to any intense music like metal, where first year players can stretch out all they want. But restraint takes a ton of maturity. It's hard to be able to do 250 mph but have to keep it under 30 all night.

Took me about 30 years of playing to fully understand this. I had no resources like DrummerWorld to guide me though. I envy the newer players with all the "easy to access" resources available.
 

New Tricks

Platinum Member
I hear a LOT of amateur drummers that suck. They over play, play too loud and rush their fills. I am better.than them.

I hear a lot that are capable and I'm just as capable.

This weekend I saw a video concert with a paid professional drummer playing a song I cover and, I felt I could play it as well as he did.



Then I hear an 8 year old on Youtube, banging out Tom Sawyer better than I could ever hope to play it and, I suck again.
 

Griffman

Member
I hear a LOT of amateur drummers that suck. They over play, play too loud and rush their fills. I am better.than them.

I hear a lot that are capable and I'm just as capable.

This weekend I saw a video concert with a paid professional drummer playing a song I cover and, I felt I could play it as well as he did.



Then I hear an 8 year old on Youtube, banging out Tom Sawyer better than I could ever hope to play it and, I suck again.
Yep. That's the roller coaster. What's the old saying.... You are never as good as you think you are on your good days, and never as bad as you think you are on your bad days
 

Otto

Platinum Member
In the end..its art.

there is no comparing 'how far' or 'how fast' between perceivers in the subject of subjective pleasure...its subjective.

We can count 'how many people say they like something and are willing to part with resources to have access to it' but that ignores a whole host of factors...such as relative exposure opportunities...and such...and one person IS NOT of greater or lesser validity than all the rest in the reality of subjective pleasure(hence the term 'subjective').

If you like someone elses playing better than your own....good for you...you have an opinion!

If you like your own more...that's great as well.

I think the most important thing is that there is SOMETHING you like!...and that your tastes are free of stagnation and prejudice...and your evaluations are full of the intended fun - and stem from appreciation and respect.

kumbyah and such....
 
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