click tracks

homersimpson

Junior Member
Do you guys use them or no?
I have a session coming up possibly with odd time signatures, and seems like I should be using one.What do you guys think?
 

dmacc_2

Well-known member
Do you guys use them or no?
I have a session coming up possibly with odd time signatures, and seems like I should be using one.What do you guys think?
Depends how things are tracked. Have used them a million times in recording studios and don't mind at all playing with them. In many cases, I've read a chart and laid the drum tracks down with just a click track and no other instrumentation at all. This method can be challenging but very efficient once you get used to it.

Also, I've recorded the drums after other parts have been laid down so using a click wasn't an option as you are sort of locked into what's been tracked. It can get a little fuzzy in these cases where players weren't feeling the time the same way and some people are ahead, some behind and some down the middle.

I'd say go for it - even playing odd time. Adjust the click accordingly. However, if the arrangement calls for various time signatures within the same piece you may need to either program a click or account for where it'll fall within the piece - especially if you are playing in 4_4 then move to a 5_8 or 7_8, etc... feel.
 
D

Doctor Dirt

Guest
You may actually be better off with odd signatures hahahaha when I first realized I stunk at working with a click track I had already wasted about 2 hours time at one of the most famous studios in the world. This was like the time I made them use my drum kit instead of the house kit.....................................talk about being young & dumb!!! I did get the hang of it but when it first was being used no one enjoyed it. The main reason was it allowed for laying tracks without the compliment being there and thats a problem with feel and for me thats an important element in my playing ability. Theres obviously others that can handle it with ease but thankfully I haven't recorded a hic up in over 30 years. Doc
 

fixxxer

Senior Member
We were in a studio doing some recording the other night. I was asked to use a click track for one of the songs and I just couldn't do it. It was a bit embarrassing! It was difficult because we were set up so we were playing all at the same time and, as a whole, we just could not keep it together with the click.
However, when recording without it, we did just fine. I want to get spend more time perfecting playing with the click now. I can definately see the benefits of it.
 

homersimpson

Junior Member
Thats interesting guys, all the musicians I know are the same way, they hate it, me on the other hand, I'm starting to like it, I seem to do better with it, with any rhythm or meter.
 

brentcn

Platinum Member
Did a session recently, and somebody's feel was just not good, speeding up and slowing down with the click. No problem, just turned down that track in my headphones, focused on the click, and did my best to groove like hell (gotta love fancy studios with fancy monitoring systems!).

The playback was, in a word, wonky, and the bandleader asked to do more takes. But we solo'd the drums and click, and everything was fine there, so I left, and the rest stayed overdubbing tracks until the wee hours of the morning.
 

Joe Morris

DRUMMERWORLD PRO DRUMMER
Use the click. Get used to it, if your gonna play in the studio your going to have to play to a click 90% of the time. As far as the odd time just make sure you have no accents on the click track or if you do make sure they are on the 1 of the bar no matter what time your in. My advise is to play without accents at all.

Joe
 

moontheloon

Silver Member
I love the metronome

rarely ever practice without it and never track without it

it has never done anything but make the recording process move along faster ...sound tighter....and make all post engineering a hell of a lot easier

and while practicing its just there....I dont pay much attention to it its simply a guideline

never had a problem playing with it....whether on top of it laying behind it or pushing it depending on what the song called for

anyone who struggles with a click I highly recommend you go to the shed and work that out asap

otherwise yr not doing the musicians that you play with any favors ...trust me

if you cant stay with a click how good do you think your time is when its not there?

not very id be willing to bet

and what is our first order of business as drummers?

keep TIME
 

marko138

Silver Member
I just finished a studio session. The engineer insisted we use a click. I put a massive amount of work into playing with a click for nearly 2 months, as I had never played to a click before.


The work paid off. I tracked 4 songs very quickly...even did one of our songs in 1 take.

Put the effort into learning to play with the click. Like these guys said...it will pay off in the end.
 

Shedboyxx

Silver Member
+1 and right on to everything below. You want to be know as the guy that keeps the time together by being on the money. There is absolutely no downside to practicing with a click so that's something to be included every time you sit down at the drums. Not like you can't practice without it but when it comes to being drummers it's really central.

Once upon a time when dinosaurs ruled the earth there was almost no way to practice with a click. All of the metronomes were too quiet for a drum set and none of them had headphone jacks. When this was the case the only guys that had to keep with a click were players working in sessions, mostly TV and Film sessions. There are a lot of old albums that you can hear time issues, especially from the 60's and 70's.

Things are very different now. There is more of a sensitivity to time issues since drum machines started being used and now with microscopic beat correction in DAW software. Even if you don't run in the circles where this time sensitivity comes up, eventually you will if you play around long enough. You don't want to miss out on anything because this skill set isn't intact.

I have a Top 40 gig that I sub for where there are backing tracks panned right and a click panned left in a headphone mix. I wouldn't be making that money if I couldn't play well with a click.

If you practice with a click whether it's odd time signatures or not, you'll be SO much freer to make music instead of worrying if you are even playing in step with the click.

Jim


BTW: I had to chuckle that this very appropriate post was made by a member who has Keith Moon in his avatar. I think the only time Moonie played with any kind of click or sequencer was on Baba O'Riley. Most of his playing as another drummer friend put it "..waves in the ocean". :)


I love the metronome

rarely ever practice without it and never track without it

it has never done anything but make the recording process move along faster ...sound tighter....and make all post engineering a hell of a lot easier

and while practicing its just there....I dont pay much attention to it its simply a guideline

never had a problem playing with it....whether on top of it laying behind it or pushing it depending on what the song called for

anyone who struggles with a click I highly recommend you go to the shed and work that out asap

otherwise yr not doing the musicians that you play with any favors ...trust me

if you cant stay with a click how good do you think your time is when its not there?

not very id be willing to bet

and what is our first order of business as drummers?

keep TIME
 

moontheloon

Silver Member
+1 and right on to everything below. You want to be know as the guy that keeps the time together by being on the money. There is absolutely no downside to practicing with a click so that's something to be included every time you sit down at the drums. Not like you can't practice without it but when it comes to being drummers it's really central.

Once upon a time when dinosaurs ruled the earth there was almost no way to practice with a click. All of the metronomes were too quiet for a drum set and none of them had headphone jacks. When this was the case the only guys that had to keep with a click were players working in sessions, mostly TV and Film sessions. There are a lot of old albums that you can hear time issues, especially from the 60's and 70's.

Things are very different now. There is more of a sensitivity to time issues since drum machines started being used and now with microscopic beat correction in DAW software. Even if you don't run in the circles where this time sensitivity comes up, eventually you will if you play around long enough. You don't want to miss out on anything because this skill set isn't intact.

I have a Top 40 gig that I sub for where there are backing tracks panned right and a click panned left in a headphone mix. I wouldn't be making that money if I couldn't play well with a click.

If you practice with a click whether it's odd time signatures or not, you'll be SO much freer to make music instead of worrying if you are even playing in step with the click.

Jim


BTW: I had to chuckle that this very appropriate post was made by a member who has Keith Moon in his avatar. I think the only time Moonie played with any kind of click or sequencer was on Baba O'Riley. Most of his playing as another drummer friend put it "..waves in the ocean". :)

hahahahah good call

Moonie hated the click ..Glyn Johns forced him to play to it on most tracks on Whos Next so he could sync up with Petes sequencer infatuation at the time

you can hear how much he hated it in his playing....you kinda hear him running away from it....then settling in....then running away then settling in....kinda like caging a crazed Lion
 
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