Classical and drums

Supernoodle

Senior Member
I like classical music and drums, but the two don't seem to mix very well. Here's a new work by a composer who added a bass part to a Bach partita and then invited drums and bass:

(music starts at 4:15)

It's very tastefully done, but does it add or take away from the original piano piece?
 

J-Boogie

Gold Member
I like classical/orchestral too, found that out not too long ago and got some great recommendations here. I get what you are saying here, I guess the trap drum set or whatever was a later invention and amalgam of the various individual percussion instruments. I am happy tho with the traditional drums in much of the music that was recommended to me, not even sure I want a modern drum set in the mix. Cool thread. Holsts The Planets is a series of music that stands out and I remember...I think its time to revisit, thanks for reminder.
 

GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
Not as much drum kit per say-but plenty of classical music has lots of percussion. Composers like Hayden, Mozart, Beethoven, etc. used percussion instruments. Kettle drums most often but snare and other percussion toys too.
 

No Way Jose

Silver Member
I recorded me playing drum kit along with Mozart once and it sounded awful. I'm probably doing something wrong.
 

Ruok

Silver Member
I don't find the baroque style very enjoyable at times, but there are some exceptions. I find it to be too busy and hyper for my tastes. But I love the baroque style of rock music that the band Kansas did in the 70s and early 80s.

But to answer the question, I do believe that adding the drums and bass to that Bach piece added to the enjoyment factor for me. What I really enjoy is slower classical music blended with a rock rhythm section. That's why I love a lot of what Apollo 100 did in the early 70s by taking many classical pieces and turning them into rock tunes. They had to eliminate a lot of the original parts and change the rhythm, but that's what I love about it.

Here's what they did with Chopin and his Etude in E major...

And they did this to Rossini's William Tell, which is a bit peppy.
 

Mongrel

Silver Member
Wait....you guys don't play drums to classical music?

Huh...I thought everybody did. Not saying I do it well....but I have done it for years.

I will try and put drums to any music I find interesting.
 

Supernoodle

Senior Member
Some interesting links and ideas... I reckon it's about having the drumset play an active role in the music, rather than just playing along to it. Often the result is just a novelty or plain annoying. The only piece where it really worked for me is Pictures at an Exhibition, re-arranged and performed by Emerson, Lake and Palmer in the 70s. Their version with Lake's lyrics/bass and Palmer's drums holds up as a proper new piece against Ravel's orchestral version.

 
Uh, there is absolutely no need to do stuff like this. It sounds awful. Imagine to put cheesy strings behind ACDC Rock songs. Would u like it?
 

Morrisman

Platinum Member
Since most classical music was devised before 1900, it makes sense that very little of it will feature the drum kit. I would consider the examples listed so far to be rock, jazz and fusion arrangements of classical themes, rather than ‘drumming to classical music’ as such. It feels a bit fake or contrived to me, like ‘Hooked on Classics’ and the disco version of Beethoven’s 5th.
I remember Sky’s version of Bach’s Toccata & Fugue in D minor. Back in the 80’s I really enjoyed it, but now I’d rather hear the original.
 

Morrisman

Platinum Member
Uh, there is absolutely no need to do stuff like this. It sounds awful. Imagine to put cheesy strings behind ACDC Rock songs. Would u like it?
I once heard a string quartet version of ‘You shook me all night long’. It actually worked OK, and took a while before we realised what the melody was.
 

Ruok

Silver Member
Not my cup of tea, but I'm sure it takes a lot of work and talent to come up with all of those parts.

 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
Plenty of classical music has been converted to rock or metal, complete with drums. Conversely, plenty of rock and metal has been converted to classical. I will argue that stylistically they are the same, just with or without electricity and distortion.

Hungarian Dances #5 - Seree Lee


If you look around, it's pretty easy to find.
 
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