Clarification/Judging Musicality

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
Hey at least I got some views on my thread. Your chocolate chip thread aint doin squat. Squat. I really didn't intend that.
 

con struct

Platinum Member
I always like to think that posters are playing to the larger audience and not the one on one void. For this thread, that's 1500 people and counting, or what's known in most circles as a pretty decent crowd.
Aren't you on tour?

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Deltadrummer

Platinum Member
About 20 years ao I watched a renowned Aboriginal painter working. Watching the wonderfully poised and confident way she stroked and dabbed the canvas was a real eye-opener. Put simply, she really grooved. You can see that quality in Picasso too ... especially in his cartoons. There is no way you can produce work like that with faltering strokes or lack of the kind of consummate control you see in top musicians.

Very kind comment, Ken! ... but I see myself as utterly non-creative. I can often see a path where to build upon what has gone before but I struggle to create from my own mind. That's what makes me a better forum writer than a novelis; without the fuel of others' thoughts (ie. creativity) I have precious little to say. I feel like a blank canvas - or maybe more a sponge - waiting for input from those who are capable of generating ideas. Then I'll synthesise, which seems to be an almost reflexive response.

Every single "creative" thing I've ever done - be it musical, art, cartoons etc is basically a ripoff :)

Maybe it's like that for almost everyone? I don't know because I've only ever inhabited one head, but when I think of the work of people like Picasso, Captain Beefheart, Sun Ra, Henry Cow, Pere Ubu, Ornette Coleman, Stockhausen, John Cage etc, I feel they have some kind of inner fuel that is genuinely creative, creating something new from what others think of as refuse. I'm guessing their creativity comes from problem-solving, having a unique personality that requires something more than what has gone before and breaking through aesthetic barriers.

I am wise to you my dear, and I see what you are doing. lol

Believe it or not, you have a very flamboyant use of language that has actually influenced my own here in the threads. Also, I've backed you into a corner more than once and seen the way you creatively find your way out. That's why I do it. :)

It's very Zen of you to suggest that all creativity comes from nothing. There may be some ultimate creative fuel that juices the likes of the greatest of artists. But even they are influenced by what has come before. Even if that something is a subway train.
 

Pollyanna

Platinum Member
I am wise to you my dear, and I see what you are doing. lol

Believe it or not, you have a very flamboyant use of language that has actually influenced my own here in the threads. Also, I've backed you into a corner more than once and seen the way you creatively find your way out. That's why I do it. :)

It's very Zen of you to suggest that all creativity comes from nothing. There may be some ultimate creative fuel that juices the likes of the greatest of artists. But even they are influenced by what has come before. Even if that something is a subway train.
Oh yeah Ken, I'm good at backing out of corners ... much experience with foot in mouth will teach you that :)

When it comes to language, that's Mum ... as a writer she could really groove! The language of music language comes less naturally to me, but music is more social. Writing and art are such solitary activities.

It's true that we're all influenced by something or someone but imagine the kind of headspace you'd need to pull together A Day in the Life back in 1966. Or to do what Jimi did around the same time?
 

Deltadrummer

Platinum Member
Oh yeah Ken, I'm good at backing out of corners ... much experience with foot in mouth will teach you that :)

When it comes to language, that's Mum ... as a writer she could really groove! The language of music language comes less naturally to me, but music is more social. Writing and art are such solitary activities.

It's true that we're all influenced by something or someone but imagine the kind of head space you'd need to pull together A Day in the Life back in 1966. Or to do what Jimi did around the same time?
I've never been a big Jimi fan, nor Cream either. It's was interesting that after our Ginger Baker thread, I was listening attentively to Cream on the radio and heard some really nice things in his playing. There was a time as a young kid when I thought his playing was the best thing I had ever heard. I loved the vital rawness. You can't let someone's idiocy affect the way you hear their playing.

The other night I had a blues gig, and all was going well until Little Wing. I really like that song, too. But the other guys kept looking at me for rushing, and I did such great fills. I like to build it into the refrain, drum solo, relax into the groove. Maybe I don't get Jimi as much as I could after spending an hour listening to him with you. When I come to Oz.

A Day in the Life is another story. Always loved that tune. But it is a just a AAA song form with nonsensical lyrics, interpolated by another piece of music, and studio affects. It's the result of a lot of minds, one part Beatles, one part Lewis Carroll, one part Stockhausen, one part Martin, one part LSD. lol I think that a lot of the time, creativity is the Gumbo mixed around in the right head or group of heads in this case.
 

criz p. critter

Silver Member
LOL (suppressed in the workplace). My ex and I were so confused when we watch Mulholland Drive we had to check out theories about it on the web. Then we watched it again - amazing :)
I only know one person who says she "understands" MD, but then her favorite film of all time is "Dumb & Dumber". Not sure what that says about her or the film....
 
M

motojt

Guest
A Day in the Life is another story. Always loved that tune. But it is a just a AAA song form with nonsensical lyrics, interpolated by another piece of music, and studio affects.
From what I understand it was written by Lennon inspired by newspaper articles and Paul inspired by his childhood, not LSD. I always hear people say that some song was written while so and so was on acid. While I used to buy in to that theory when I was a kid I don't anymore. It's too convenient to say something was drug inspired just because it's perceived to be weird or unintelligible. I've never dropped acid in my life - I don't even drink, but I come up with bizarre shit all the time that makes people ask me if I'm on drugs. If the writer tells you they were on acid at the time, fine, but don't write everything off as a bad trip.
 

Deltadrummer

Platinum Member
From what I understand it was written by Lennon inspired by newspaper articles and Paul inspired by his childhood, not LSD. I always hear people say that some song was written while so and so was on acid. While I used to buy in to that theory when I was a kid I don't anymore. It's too convenient to say something was drug inspired just because it's perceived to be weird or unintelligible. I've never dropped acid in my life - I don't even drink, but I come up with bizarre shit all the time that makes people ask me if I'm on drugs. If the writer tells you they were on acid at the time, fine, but don't write everything off as a bad trip.
I was just making a sly tongue and cheek nudge for Polly, and I am sure she understood me. But yes, you are right. It is really bizarre when people start reading their own subjective interpretations into things. :p
 

Pollyanna

Platinum Member
I was just making a sly tongue and cheek nudge for Polly, and I am sure she understood me. But yes, you are right. It is really bizarre when people start reading their own subjective interpretations into things. :p
Nah Ken, I took it literally :) If there was no acid involved in the making of Sgt Pepper then I'm a nun.

It reminds me of the Aphrodite's Child album, 666, where there is a comment about it being produced "under the influence of sahlep". I thought it must be something terribly sinister (and exciting) like a special drug or maybe their demonic master. The story goes that so did a number of radio stations at the time, who banned it, Especially after that creepy "Infinity" song by a seemingly possessed Irene Papas.

Turns out that Vangelis and Demis (the main band members) were just playing mysterious and being more than a little cheeky, Salep is herbal tea. If they said the album was recorded under the influence of chamomille, they wouldn't have been banned but it wouldn't have been nearly as much fun ...

No idea what this has to do with musicality, BTW :)
 

Deltadrummer

Platinum Member
Nah Ken, I took it literally :) If there was no acid involved in the making of Sgt Pepper then I'm a nun.

It reminds me of the Aphrodite's Child album, 666, where there is a comment about it being produced "under the influence of sahlep". I thought it must be something terribly sinister (and exciting) like a special drug or maybe their demonic master. The story goes that so did a number of radio stations at the time, who banned it, Especially after that creepy "Infinity" song by a seemingly possessed Irene Papas.

Turns out that Vangelis and Demis (the main band members) were just playing mysterious and being more than a little cheeky, Salep is herbal tea. If they said the album was recorded under the influence of chamomille, they wouldn't have been banned but it wouldn't have been nearly as much fun ...

No idea what this has to do with musicality, BTW :)
There has long been a controversy about the influence of LSD on that album; but yes you're right. It was definitely in the mix. But still I meant it somewhat tongue and cheek. But if I have to explain why, it's a bit silly. That was an ingredient in the mix that dramatically changed the music, if for nothing else, it changed the focus and meaning of life, or a day in thereof.
 
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