CANT HEAR KICK DRUM IN PRACTICE

akasticks

Junior Member
We are currently practicing in one of the guys church, for lack of another place to practice. they have electric drums set up, so i have to set up my kit for every practice.

The problem is, during practice, I cant seem to really hear my kick drum. I dont know if its the acoustics of the building or something else.

has anyone had this problem? Any solutions found? Or any innocative ideas to solve this problem without having a major setup??
 

Pocket-full-of-gold

Platinum Member
There's a couple of quick fixes worth trying. Firstly, you can mic the bass drum and run it through the church's PA. Or secondly, try some sort of makeshift baffle in front of your bass drum. it may help to focus the sound back at you rather than out into the wild blue yonder of the church hall.
 

drumtechdad

Gold Member
Try different locations in the room. Even a few feet can make a sizable difference.

Unmiked? Tune the bass drum for sustain. Use an unported reso if you have one, and remove all muffling.
 

caddywumpus

Platinum Member
Welcome to the club. :D

I don't rehearse with rock bands too much anymore (I usually just show up for the gigs). Yeah, when you've got your typical guitar player who loves his setup and cranks it, and the bass player has to turn up to compensate, you're not left with much bass drum sound...
 

jer

Silver Member
Kick harder, ya wuss! :)

I use my inability to hear my kick as an indication that everyone needs to turn down a notch or 4.
 

keep it simple

Platinum Member
I usually nail the volume issue very quickly. If the band is too loud, I play at half volume so they can't hear me. They notice straight away and remark that I'm too quiet. I remind them they have a volume knob & I don't. They turn down & I play at normal levels again. Do that once or twice & they get the message. My present band is very cooperative though and the bass player is very keen on balance. That's cool with me.
 

akasticks

Junior Member
ALL GREAT SUGGESTIONS...HAVING REHEARSAL TONIGHT, THERE IS A WALL DIERCTLY BEHIND WHERE I SET UP, I MAY JUST SET UP FACING IT TONIGHT. ALSO WILL TRY THE TUNING, THANKS GUYS, ILL LET YOU KNOW WHO IT TURNS OUT.
 

Drum-Head

Silver Member
I use my inability to hear my kick as an indication that everyone needs to turn down a notch or 4.
Same method here - in rehearsal if I can't hear my kick or have to force my technique, that means the amps are too loud. This is the first thing we'd check before starting to rehearse.
 

alparrott

Platinum Member
ALL GREAT SUGGESTIONS...HAVING REHEARSAL TONIGHT, THERE IS A WALL DIERCTLY BEHIND WHERE I SET UP, I MAY JUST SET UP FACING IT TONIGHT. ALSO WILL TRY THE TUNING, THANKS GUYS, ILL LET YOU KNOW WHO IT TURNS OUT.
Worst thing you can do in a worship setting is turn AWAY from the band leader, unless your songs are so tightly arranged that there's no variance.

If you're not miked, you will have to make the drum project. Do you have it stuffed full of pillows and blankets and laundry? Out with them! Do you have the batter head tuned so low it sounds like you're playing a paper bag? Tune it up. If you have a double-sided beater, get the harder surface involved.
 

dairyairman

Platinum Member
you wouldn't be playing heel down by any chance would you? it's hard to get serious volume out the bass drum playing heel down. i play heel up pretty much all the time, unless i'm playing light jazz or a quiet ballad. it's generally easier to get a solid, punchy sound out of the drum playing heel up.
 

eddiehimself

Platinum Member
ALL GREAT SUGGESTIONS...HAVING REHEARSAL TONIGHT, THERE IS A WALL DIERCTLY BEHIND WHERE I SET UP, I MAY JUST SET UP FACING IT TONIGHT. ALSO WILL TRY THE TUNING, THANKS GUYS, ILL LET YOU KNOW WHO IT TURNS OUT.
OK GOOD TELL US HOW IT GOES THEN AND POSSIBLY CHECK YOUR CAPS LOCK KEY ON THE WAY OUT.
 
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