Can you be a good drummer with bad math skills?

Dr_Watso

Platinum Member
I debated with myself if I should go with the opposite "blonde - math is hard" stereotype, or the "Asians are automatically good at math" stereotype. The decision was based on the aforementioned fact that the latter is more of a compliment, as who doesn't want to be good at math?

It's not easy having such a complex decision making system, but I'm pretty successful in hurting the least amount of feelings possible, I think. Very important in this day and age that you not offend anyone who's offend-able.
 

GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
I just assumed you were referring to their nationality. According to National Geographic " Today, Asia is home to the citizens of Afghanistan, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Brunei, Cambodia, China, Georgia, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Israel, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Laos, Lebanon, Malaysia, Maldives, Mongolia, Myanmar (Burma), Nepal, North Korea, Oman, Pakistan, Philippines, Qatar, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Singapore, South Korea, Sri Lanka, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, Timor-Leste (East Timor), Turkey, Turkmenistan, United Arab Emirates, Uzbekistan, Vietnam, and Yemen." So it's a good bet someone in those countries is good at math-since that is the majority of the population of planet. There is no biological race so using the term "Asian" has to refer to location because it is like calling someone "Big Foot" because both are mythical.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
So you're saying there's not one Canadian in Asia?

Wow Art.

Art. Short for smart.

James, was this debate with yourself said aloud or were you just debating silently? Just so I have the clearest possible mental image. If it was out loud, was there any slobber involved?
 

One Up One Down

Senior Member
You've left out the all important detail:

Was she hot?
So, we weren't sure if this person was male or female -- they were very androgynous-looking. I suspect female but don't actually know, so to simplify the story I used female. The next question is: Is that a turn-on for you? ;)
 

Dr_Watso

Platinum Member
James, was this debate with yourself said aloud or were you just debating silently? Just so I have the clearest possible mental image. If it was out loud, was there any slobber involved?
Unfortunately, internal debate. I'd get in all sorts of trouble if I just said everything I was thinking about the idiocy around me.

I'll make you a deal though, as we share our first beer, I'll go full stream of consciousness running dialog for you until you call uncle out of embarrassment and we get kicked out of the McDonalds play area for having beer.
 

JustJames

Platinum Member
So, we weren't sure if this person was male or female -- they were very androgynous-looking. I suspect female but don't actually know, so to simplify the story I used female. The next question is: Is that a turn-on for you? ;)
Not so much.

I preferred it when she used to be a hot blonde Asian girl with a fondness for German beer and the guitar stylings of Stevie Ray Vaughan.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
I'll make you a deal though, as we share our first beer, I'll go full stream of consciousness running dialog for you until you call uncle out of embarrassment and we get kicked out of the McDonalds play area for having beer.
Hmm. Let me think about that.

OK I'm done.

As attractive as that sounds, I'm gonna hold out for a better deal :p
 

Odd-Arne Oseberg

Platinum Member
True story, when I first started out with music, I didn't even get the concept of counting to 4. I knew that music was cyclical, and I knew that we always counted to 4 before starting to play, but I didn't put the two things together in that the pulse you counted off relates to the tempo and length of the cycle.

So you don't even really have to count at all if you just pay attention to the rhythms in what you're playing.

And I think that's totally fine. I see all sorts of things with my younger students. Sometimes older students, too.

Anyone can learn anything provided a bit of realism, patience and a teacher who doesn't give up until he/she finds the way that helps you understand.

If something on the drums is mathematically challenging to yuo, then you're trying to progrss about 100 000x faster than you should if you want those skills to have any artistic, musical, pedagogical or personal technical relevance.

Baby steps and as close to total mastery as you can get at that point in time. It's not the only way, but I'll argue for it being the best until my dying day.

If you can't actually use it, it has no all value.
 
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