Building a small PVC soundproof booth with duvets

Adela

New member
Hi guys,


I am a professional violinist and recently,I have started taking singing lessons as well.
I live in a small studio and practicing there,especially the singing,is impossible because I would disturb the neighbours. I also really want to have a small space where I can practice whenever I feel like,without anybody listening to me.
I am renting ,I dont have permission to make big changes to the place so I was thinking to go for the following cheaper option:

- Build a PVC frame,big enough for me to fit in comfortably,with my violin
-Solve the air gaps problem by completely covering it with the side panels of a garden tent,ceiling of the frame included.
-Going inside,I would hang 2 duvets and 2 blankets,like curtains,to block more sound.
-I would add double or triple carpet layers on the floor.
-On the duvets and blankets,I would glue acoustic foam everywhere,for more soundproofing but also to make it look really nice from the inside.
-Lastly,I would add a ventilation system with a fan,a tube and making a space in the back of the booth to insert the tube,while sealing all the air gaps with some soundproofing scotch or whatever else I can find. And of course,a light on the inside.

It would all cost around 400$ ,even less considering I already have the duvets.The foam would be the most expensive for complete coverage,around 250$.

In my imagination,it would look great from the outside,because of the beautiful tent pannels,from the inside as well and I imagine that it would reduce the noise I make with about 50/% at least,since I am sealing the air gaps. So a very small and cheap practice and recording studio.

Do you think my vision is realistic? Would it soundproof a little bit only with the foam and duvets?

Thanks a lot!!
 

Mongrel

Silver Member
Confession: I am not an expert at sound proofing.

Random thoughts:

1 what you are describing would work well for sound absorption, but not so good for sound "proofing". It will deaden the sound but not really keep it from escaping-especially the ventilation system you described. You really need a bard surface within a hard surface separated by "air" for a dead space, with your sound absorption material on the inside of the first surface and the inside of your second surface but not touching. At least that is one method I have read up on.

2. Having said that, it may be enough to satisfy the neighbors because unlike drums you are not transferring energy from the kit to the floor, ceiling, and walls from the percussion effect. Also, as the violin and presumably your vocal range are on the higher side with little to no "bass" you are not transferring the slower sound waves through walls, floors, and ceilings, like a bass guitar would. Again, the "blanket" effect may be enough to keep things bearable to the neighbors.

3. Do you have a closet available that does not share a common wall with other units? In my daughter's complex, each unit has a decent size closet that only the back wall touches another unit. I understand that closet space is a premium in any unit, but a "room within a room" would be the best way to isolate your pracitce volume from your neighbors. If you had the room to set up your tent in a closet it would be even quieter.

4. if possible talk to your neighbors and ask them what times they are away from their apartment. Try and work your practice schedule into and around their "away" schedule.

Just some thoughts off the top of my head for now.

And by the way, I think a drummer's forum is a great place to come with your questions about sound proofing.
 
Last edited:

AzHeat

Platinum Member
Your PVC idea gives me and idea! I can' see why it wouldn't work for drums either to some extent. I'm thinking a wall of blankets, instead of plexus glass enclosure. Sure would be easier to get in and out of too.
 

dboomer

Senior Member
To find out, lay your blanket and eggcrate foam over a hifi speaker. That will show you how much reduction you’ll get(not much in my book). But if you are happy with that then build your box.
 

AzHeat

Platinum Member
To find out, lay your blanket and eggcrate foam over a hifi speaker. That will show you how much reduction you’ll get(not much in my book). But if you are happy with that then build your box.
According to this guy, they work pretty darned well.
 

dboomer

Senior Member
The video is about sound absorption not soundproofing. Big difference!

Check this one ... two layers of 5/8 sheetrock, floating with green glue

 

DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
Honestly, I doubt that will do much.

Acoustic foam, blankets, etc, do little to reduce sound transmission. Foam is to reduce sound bouncing around in a room. It does very little to reduce sound going through it.

To reduce sound transmission, you need mass. Like an actual wall.
 

PorkPieGuy

Platinum Member
I try to think outside the box, so here goes.

Go ride around in your car to practice singing. Like, seriously. Back when I was singing BGV's all the time in a band, I would practice during my 45-minute commute while on the highway. Getting 1.5 hours of practice a day did a world of good. Never did it in town because I didn't want to cause accidents.

If I was practicing violin, I'd go find an empty ball park or field and practice there. Playing stringed instruments outside makes squeaks and bad notes more tolerable because the sound isn't bouncing off of walls in your home.
 

Mighty_Joker

Silver Member
I built a soundproofed drum studio from from scratch, and look at all the work and materials that went into it. It still leaks noise a little bit: Link to videos

I am sorry to say your idea will achieve nothing except wasting time and money. As others have said, learn the difference between sound treatment and soundproofing. Soundproofing works using two methods, and two methods only: mass and air gap/isolation.
 

TMe

Senior Member
Hiring someone to add a layer of 5/8" drywall on resilient channel to your walls might do the trick without shrinking the room too much. The drywall would add mass and the resilient channel would provide a bit of an air gap between the two layers of drywall.

I know someone who lives next door to a music teacher (vox and piano). The teacher put an extra layer of drywall on the shared wall and that reduced the sound transmission greatly.

Stopping sound going through your floor and ceiling though, that could be the real challenge.

One thing to consider is that the smaller the space, the easier it is to soundproof. How small can you go?
 

Mongrel

Silver Member
Hiring someone to add a layer of 5/8" drywall on resilient channel to your walls might do the trick without shrinking the room too much. The drywall would add mass and the resilient channel would provide a bit of an air gap between the two layers of drywall.

I know someone who lives next door to a music teacher (vox and piano). The teacher put an extra layer of drywall on the shared wall and that reduced the sound transmission greatly.

Stopping sound going through your floor and ceiling though, that could be the real challenge.

One thing to consider is that the smaller the space, the easier it is to soundproof. How small can you go?
OP:

"I am renting ,I dont have permission to make big changes to the place...."
 
Top