brush it off

joeysnare

Silver Member
A friend of mine gave me my xmas gift last night, a wicked coffin shaped stick bag. Low and behold there was a surprise inside a set of wire brushes.
Im mostly a metal player so have never used brushes before, but i figure what the heck ill try anything once.
Can anyone suggest any good examples of brush work that i can use as a guide to get started?
 

Average

Senior Member
Second that. He has a DVD out. Saw him at a master class in Chicago at the Drum Pad. He really is a master. He is in my top 2 or 3 for brush players ever.
 

jake_larson

Senior Member
Clayton Cameron and Jeff Hamilton are my favorite brush players. I even got to meet them and both of them are very nice helpful people
 

brady

Platinum Member
The Art of Playing with Brushes with Steve Smith and Adam Nussbaum is really cool. It features a lot of jazz players (Joe Morello, Billy Hart, Ben Riley, etc) so you can see all of their individual styles.
However, if you play mostly metal you can probably save a few bucks and simply get a lot of ideas from checking out a ton of the brushes videos on Youtube.

Check it out, you might have fun. Maybe you could come up with a cool heavy metal drum solo piece...with brushes!!
 

joeysnare

Silver Member
hey thanks for all the great suggestions everyone, and i actually am starting to work on a lil brush double bass solo. the low volume of the brushes is really forcing me to pay attention to the dynamics of my bass drum, im starting to think this new style of drumming is really going to help my playing progress :)
 

Living Dead Drummer

Platinum Member
hey thanks for all the great suggestions everyone, and i actually am starting to work on a lil brush double bass solo. the low volume of the brushes is really forcing me to pay attention to the dynamics of my bass drum, im starting to think this new style of drumming is really going to help my playing progress :)
That it will my friend, watching guys like Claton and Jeff really put a new spin on Brush playing for me.

And if you ever get sick of that Coffin stick case (like I did, because it doesn't hold enough f*ing sticks!) it works real nice as a tool box for gigs...
 

BassDriver

Silver Member
hey thanks for all the great suggestions everyone, and i actually am starting to work on a lil brush double bass solo. the low volume of the brushes is really forcing me to pay attention to the dynamics of my bass drum, im starting to think this new style of drumming is really going to help my playing progress :)
Definitely will reflect into your overall drumming technical ability and musicality.

When you learn to play fast rudiments with brushes your speed will increase with sticks, I notice it right away when I switch back to sticks after doing some rudiments, but its best effect is in the long term.

That improved control and speed is especially useful in metal drumming.

Remember the wire bristled brushes are best for performance and recording for their sound.

Nylon bristled brushes are good for practice because they won't bend as badly as wire, nylon can be bent back to shape, while wire - especially if dropped or if you do that accidental tom rimshot here or there - will just get messy and you end up pulling the wires out.

Nylon has a terrible sound because of that "shss" sound from the nylon bristles colliding with each other, kind of killing that sought after sound, snare drum scrapes are not very smooth. Wire brushes really bring out the drum tone and the cymbal ring.
 
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