"Brazil" by Ari Barroso - Which Groove?

Nick S.

Member
Hello folks, I'm hoping you can help me out on short notice. I've been asked (via email) by a local big band to temporarily fill their drum chair. I haven't played in a big band since I performed with my high school "stage band" in the late 70's. One of the tunes I've been asked to play is "Brazil" by Ari Barroso. My knowledge of the big band repertoire is limited, so I'm only vaguely familiar with this composition. Can anyone familiar with a big band arrangement of this number suggest a groove to use? I assume a "Latin" style beat would be appropriate, but which one? I own the Tommy Igoe "Groove Essentials" collection, so pointing me to one of his drum set adaptations of Latin feels would be helpful.

Thanks a lot,
Nick
 

dairyairman

Platinum Member
tommy igoe does have 3 samba examples on that groove essentials 1.0 cd, and i happen to be working on them, but i don't think any of those grooves would quite fit that particular tune if you played them exactly like he does. you might have to get creative.
 

jeffwj

Platinum Member
Remember that with a big band, the clearer your beat - the better the band will hold itself together. This may mean watering down the beat for the sake of the tune. Also, remember that the band will respond (lock in) to sharp tones - rim clicks, rim shots, bell of cymbal, etc...

Jeff
 
Hello folks, I'm hoping you can help me out on short notice. I've been asked (via email) by a local big band to temporarily fill their drum chair. I haven't played in a big band since I performed with my high school "stage band" in the late 70's. One of the tunes I've been asked to play is "Brazil" by Ari Barroso. My knowledge of the big band repertoire is limited, so I'm only vaguely familiar with this composition. Can anyone familiar with a big band arrangement of this number suggest a groove to use? I assume a "Latin" style beat would be appropriate, but which one? I own the Tommy Igoe "Groove Essentials" collection, so pointing me to one of his drum set adaptations of Latin feels would be helpful.

Thanks a lot,
Nick

Brazil is an old school "faux latin" tune that can be done a myriad of ways. It's usually played as a sort of bastardized samba, and you'll find the drum part on tunes like this with a kind 'cascara like' bell pattern.

the tune has that classic, no name latin feel...

dum dum dum... dum dadum dadum.


The pattern I'd use (and HAVE used many times on tunes like this that are kind of generic latin) is that groove in 2.0 that Tommy calls an all purpose latin beat. Groove 81? I think it is.

It works.
 
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Nick S.

Member
Thanks for the quick responses guys. Jeff, this is Nick Schrenk. You put me in touch with Steve Fidyk a couple of years ago. I drove from Winchester, VA to his house in Maryland and had a great lesson with him. He's a great guy, a great teacher, and a superb player! It turns out that Steve plays with Jay Gibble (trombone), who directs (I believe) the big band I've been asked to sit in with, in The Capital Bones (http://www.thecapitolbones.com/). Anyway, I was asked yesterday (Thursday) to play this coming Monday with the band I never seen or heard them, and only received the invitation because of work I've done in the past with their bassist. I haven't received any charts or any sound files of the band's performances, so I'll be flying by the seat of my pants. The previous drummer took the drum book with him when he left, so I expect to be handed a trumpet lead sheet on Monday night. My reading skills are not highly developed, so I figured I'd prepare as best I can to avoid a poor performance. I was sent this video link of an amateur big band performing a similar arrangement (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JSR8FLmfNDA&feature=player_embedded#!), but the sound is poor, and I'm not convinced the drummer is playing an appropriate part anyway.

I'd love to schedule a lesson with you if you find yourself in NOVA with an hour to spare. Email: nickschrenk@yahoo.com
 

jeffwj

Platinum Member
Thanks for the quick responses guys. Jeff, this is Nick Schrenk. You put me in touch with Steve Fidyk a couple of years ago. I drove from Winchester, VA to his house in Maryland and had a great lesson with him.

...I'd love to schedule a lesson with you if you find yourself in NOVA with an hour to spare. Email: nickschrenk@yahoo.com
Glad to hear you had a good lesson with Steve. I'm not sure if he has time this weekend, but if you're really concerned give him a call and schedule a lesson. If he's free, he should be able to help you out.

I've been gigging up in NOVA, DC, WV, MD, etc... I will contact you if I am passing through Winchester and we could get together for a lesson. I was just passing through there the other week for a gig.

Listen to the horn part on that recording. It is the rhythm that percusman was talking about. That rhythm can be incorporated in the drum pattern on the cymbal bell. Fidyk talks alot about not just playing a generic beat - but actually incorporating the rhythms that the band is playing. It gives a more musical result.

If you want to solidify the rhythm even more, you can try playing quarter notes on a left foot cowbell or jam block.

Jeff
 

Nick S.

Member
The left foot cowbell / jam block is a great idea. Is there a product you prefer for holding the cowbell, such as the LP Gajate Bracket for example? I'll have a look over at the Drum Gear section for opinions as well.
 

jeffwj

Platinum Member
The left foot cowbell / jam block is a great idea. Is there a product you prefer for holding the cowbell, such as the LP Gajate Bracket for example? I'll have a look over at the Drum Gear section for opinions as well.
I actually prefer the Gibraltar version - not the LP. After playing both, the Gibraltar one seems more sturdy.

Jeff
 
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