Best sticks for traditional grip?

Dracovyrn

Senior Member
Hello,

I am a percussionist in high school, although I just graduated. I marched tenors during marching season and then I did snare in indoor. I noticed, however, that when practicing on snare, certain sticks seemed to feel... Better, when using traditional grip; like the system blue DC 50s, which seemed to work better at the higher angle that the left hand requires than the right hand. My favorite sticks are the Scojos, (ms5) since I prefer matched grip, but It seems as though the sticks don't work very well at the higher angle that the sticks need to be at and I have to pull my hand down to where my hand is in this awkward thumb on top grip, which is simply bad form. Basically, what I wanted to ask was, What sticks feel best for you when using traditional grip? Why do you choose that stick?
 

Pocket-full-of-gold

Platinum Member
No such thing. There's only sticks that feel better to YOU. Period.

I use a variety of sticks and I can play matched and trad. with all of them. The player controls the stick, the stick does not control the player.
 

Jeremy Bender

Platinum Member
From your description I think there is a much larger issue here than stick thickness. Your technique is what concerns me. Have you sought some one-on-one instruction from a competent teacher? I ask this out of concern for the future health of your hands and arms,

Take a look at some YouTube videos of how drummers like: Jeff Queen, DaveWeckl, Tommy Igoe, Jim Chapin, Dom Famularo, Buddy Rich or Louie Bellson control the sticks. Watch the speed, power, and smooth flowing motion that they display. They all play with different weight sticks.

Just a recommendation from a guy who's closing in on 50. ;)
 

Dracovyrn

Senior Member
"Your technique is what concerns me. Have you sought some one-on-one instruction from a competent teacher? I ask this out of concern for the future health of your hands and arms," -Jeremy Bender

There is nothing wrong with my form. I have had three different teachers in the last three years and all three said I had great form, better than most high schoolers. I make sure to pay attention to videos of professionals like jeff queen, scott johnson, etc.

"The player controls the stick, the stick does not control the player" -Pocket-full-of-gold

I simply meant that some "feel better," but not that I can't use any pair of sticks handed to me.

"there should be no angle difference in your stick position" -Anthony Amodeo

There should be with traditional grip. That is why the grip was created. Of course, it is pertinent that the sticks be as close to the same angle as possible, but without changing to a bad form, there will be a slight difference, if maybe only by ten degrees. Here, watch this video.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BZ_SGC-AuW8

I just learned this grid, it's quite fun. But notice how the left hand is ever so slightly raised in angle on the left hand. not to much, but that is what my hands look like when I play.


Over all, my question is simple. What feels best for YOU? I'm simply curious and would like to hear some opinions I understand that for a few, it might not matter, but I'm sure all of you have some sort of preferance. I can use all sticks in trad. but there would be no reason to have different sticks if all sticks had the same feel and sound.
 

Pocket-full-of-gold

Platinum Member
I simply meant that some "feel better," but not that I can't use any pair of sticks handed to me.
When questions like "best stick for traditional grip?" get asked, it easy to assume you may be missing the wider point, even if you're not. There is no "best" only preference.....especially with respect to things like sticks which are chosen as much for the way they feel in individual hands as anything else.


Over all, my question is simple. What feels best for YOU?
My stick preferences have changed many times over the years, but "feel" has always been the main driver. I've used pretty much every brand, every type of wood and a wide variety of tip shapes in both wood and nylon over the years. These days I my preference is for a hickory stick somewhere between a 5A and 5B with a rounded wooden tip and a balance point "where I like it.".
But I also use maple sticks, 7A's, and 3A's depending on what I'm doing.

The choice of stick has always been dictated by both the "feel" and the playing application........not the grip. I use the same stick when playing trad grip as I do when playing matched.
 

mandrew

Gold Member
I find that for concert work, I prefer a round bead stick, like the VF SD1. for other applications, a standard bead as found on the 2B, 5A, and 5B are comfortable. It is about what feels good for you, and how you sit/stand and angle to your instruments.
 

Arky

Platinum Member
there should be no angle difference in your stick position
That's interesting. I've been noticing a difference in hand position/stick angle on various drummers all the time, it definitely looks like different angles to me (esp. the vintage drummers).

Due to the nature of trad grip, the stick is positioned differently. While the 'trad hand' has the stick at the top of the hand, it's the opposite with the 'matched hand'. So to offset this and create identical stick angles, the hands would have to be positioned at various heights. Personally I find it a bit uncomfortable to lower my trad hand for the only reason to create identical angles. There's a compromise - finding a medium position so the hands and stick position would mis-match in an identical way. You can't have your hands and stick positions identical 100% at the same time when using trad grip, that's simply impossible.

As for 'best sticks' - sure there is no such thing, you have to find out for yourself. What is working for me are the Pro Mark Todd Sucherman SD330W signature sticks. I switch between matched and trad all the time so whatever sticks I'd buy, they have to feel comfy with both grips. Plus, I prefer sticks with fast 'response', for 'finesse' (rudiment stuff). To me, those sticks give me that feel. Check them out.
Here's the manufacturer info: "Heavier weight and wider diameter. Like a 5B, but with a modified acorn-shaped tip. Great if you like a large diameter, but light weight. [The weight is enough to be punchy though.] Diameter 15.2mm / .600'', length 406mm / 16''."
 

mpthomson

Senior Member
"
"there should be no angle difference in your stick position" -Anthony Amodeo

There should be with traditional grip. That is why the grip was created. Of course, it is pertinent that the sticks be as close to the same angle as possible, but without changing to a bad form, there will be a slight difference, if maybe only by ten degrees. .
I may be misunderstanding your point here, but stick angle isn't the reason that traditional grip was originally used. It's to do with the mechanics of the wrist and the difficulty of playing a drum sharply angled to the right and away from you with your left hand in a matched grip position.

In terms of sticks, no different to if I'm playing matched grip, 5A or 7A for quieter gigs. There aren't any 'best' sticks, just your personal favourites.
 
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Anthony Amodeo

Guest
There should be with traditional grip. That is why the grip was created. Of course, it is pertinent that the sticks be as close to the same angle as possible, but without changing to a bad form, there will be a slight difference, if maybe only by ten degrees. Here, watch this video.
thats not why the grip was created.

the grip was created because of tilted drums and so the player could comfortably drop his elbow and play with the sticks even

and I'll say it again...there should be no difference in angle in your sticks.

if one chooses to create an angle difference while playing for comfort that is their choice

but if you are sitting at rest with the beads resting on the pad or drum and you have a noticeable angle difference there is a problem with your grip or arm position.

in the drum corps. I marched in they always urged us to have matching stick angles
 

Dracovyrn

Senior Member
I may be misunderstanding your point here.
You are. I precisely meant that trad. grip was first made to accomodate the slanted angle of the civil war drums, and thus physically, it was made to have a natural slant, therefore, it is bad form to be completely level because the left hand will shift backwards and have less give.

You can't have your hands and stick positions identical 100% at the same time when using trad grip, that's simply impossible.
Thank You!

When questions like "best stick for traditional grip?" get asked, it easy to assume you may be missing the wider point, even if you're not ... I use the same stick when playing trad grip as I do when playing matched.
I also use the same stick for either. I want to make clear that I am asking for peoples stick preferance, simply out of curiosity. I am sorry, I understand where someone would get that confused and so I should have stated what I meant more clearly.

I will still use Ms5 sticks as my top choice, trad. or not! but I did think that the DC50 system blue sticks felt more responsive, although I didn't like the way they felt in matched.

Clearly stated, What is the Best "Feeling" sticks for You in Your Opinion when using Traditional Grip?
 
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Anthony Amodeo

Guest
Due to the nature of trad grip, the stick is positioned differently.
my left stick is positioned exactly the same as my right ...just with my hand on the bottom of the stick.

no difference in position or angle

if I flip my hand to matched nothing changes about the stick.....it stays exactly where it was

as was taught to me and reenforced by some of the best players to breathe our air
 

Pocket-full-of-gold

Platinum Member
although I didn't like the way they felt in matched.
Assuming you're a right hander, then the way in which you hold the stick in your right hand doesn't change at all.....regardless of the grip used. How can you not like the feel of a stick in your left hand, but it doesn't seem to bother you in your right? This makes little sense to me, mate.
 

brady

Platinum Member
my left stick is positioned exactly the same as my right ...just with my hand on the bottom of the stick.

no difference in position or angle

if I flip my hand to matched nothing changes about the stick.....it stays exactly where it was

as was taught to me and reenforced by some of the best players to breathe our air
Exactly.

This was explained...and demonstrated by Steve Smith in his Drumset Techniques DVD. I'm not sure if there is a Youtube clip of it or not.

He shows both grips on the snare, and the angle between the two sticks never changes .
 

Dracovyrn

Senior Member
the grip was created because of tilted drums and so the player could comfortably drop his elbow and play with the sticks even
I already went over this.

and I'll say it again...there should be no difference in angle in your sticks.
I'm sure most have there preference. I'm not going to go as far as to tell you you're wrong, but simply that you're different. I understand the importance of having the sticks as close to the same angle as possible, but in order to have the best control, the left hand stick angle will be Very Slightly different.

if one chooses to create an angle difference while playing for comfort that is their choice
Didn't you just say there should be no angle?

but if you are sitting at rest with the beads resting on the pad or drum and you have a noticeable angle difference there is a problem with your grip or arm position.
All three of my teachers had masters degrees from respectable universities, and all three have said that my grip was better because I didn't pull my arm down.

I have a camera, but I don't know how to work it well. Let's see If I can make a video for ya'll to look at my grip and playstyle.

In the meantime, Stop bickering about improper form and answer the question! If you have other things to say, message me. But honestly, your talk about stick angles is only relevent in playing style, but mostly disinterests me.
 

Dracovyrn

Senior Member
How can you not like the feel of a stick in your left hand, but it doesn't seem to bother you in your right? This makes little sense to me, mate.
I meant that it didn't feel right in my right hand in trad. or both of my hands in matched. In my opinion, they were a little too responsive for me.

just snapped a pic of how I was taught in drum corps.
and what was also reenforced by Steve Smith , Elvin Jones , Dave Weckl, Peter Erskine, and Bill Platt while studying with them

notice there is no angle difference
You never mentioned that your right hand was the one being pulled up. By the way you were arguing. most would assume you meant that the left hand had to be pulled down. But I see you meant.
 
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Anthony Amodeo

Guest
You never mentioned that your right hand was the one being pulled up. By the way you were arguing. most would assume you meant that the left hand had to be pulled down. But I see you meant.
I never mentioned it because it's not happening

my right hand is angled down because for the bead to touch the pad my wrist has to slightly drop.

if my wrist was completely straight the shoulder of the stick would contact the pad

bad photo angle
 

Arky

Platinum Member
Plenty of great info in this thread already - thanks everybody for the discussion!
Please stay nice to each other. ;-)
 
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