Best (most stable and strong) cymbal stand ever made? Brand/model?

barryabko

Senior Member
Hi All,

Your opinion please - what is the best cymbal stand ever manufactured? By 'best" I mean most stable and strong (weight is not an issue since these won't be for gigging). What brand and models? I don't mean best performance for the money but best performance period. Please only discuss stands with which you have direct user experience.

I already own Sonor 5000 II and Sonor Phonic stands - both of which are excellent. I'm aware of the Sonor Signature stands. Anything better? I also have 1990s top model Yamaha 900 series and current DW 9700 series stands which are very good but not as intense as the Sonors. Other stands I own are 1980s Pearl, Tama and Gretsch. I have several Gibraltar racks on which cymbal arms can be mounted but I'd like to physically decouple each cymbal from each other.

Thanks!

Barry
 
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toddbishop

Platinum Member
History's biggest, most absurdly overkill cymbal stands were made in the mid-80's by Tama and Sonor. I think Tama was triple-bracing them at one point. Yamaha also made a stand with a gigantic, 4-foot base. To me they're a little bit like using a deuce and a half to haul your groceries, but there you go.
 

Deathmetalconga

Platinum Member
History's biggest, most absurdly overkill cymbal stands were made in the mid-80's by Tama and Sonor. I think Tama was triple-bracing them at one point. Yamaha also made a stand with a gigantic, 4-foot base. To me they're a little bit like using a deuce and a half to haul your groceries, but there you go.
Crazy! Triple braced!

I had a Tama hihaht stand from that era and I recently sold it. After 25 years of use, it worked just as good as the day I got it.
 

Chonson

Senior Member
As noted - I remember Tama being heavy in the 80s/90s but I remember Sonor taking it to a completely different and altogether ridiculous level. So if you need sheer weight, then Sonor. In my opinion, though, if something as heavy as a DW 9000 series isn't cutting it, you need to re-evaluate how you're setting up. That's a ton of weight to hold up only a couple pounds of metal.
 

barryabko

Senior Member
In my opinion, though, if something as heavy as a DW 9000 series isn't cutting it, you need to re-evaluate how you're setting up. That's a ton of weight to hold up only a couple pounds of metal.
Hi Chonson,

Thank you for your comment.

The static weight of a cymbal may be only a few pounds but the dynamic weight of the cymbal at the moment of inertia (when it is struck) is much different. In addition, the amount of energy that is created and needs to dissipate over a several second period is also much greater. I believe that the more rigid the stand the more effectively it can allow the cymbal to create and maintain the acoustic wavelaunch. In other words, it allows the cymbal to create a more dynamic percussive soundwave and also allows the decay and overtones to be more fully realized.

Best,

Barry
 
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toddbishop

Platinum Member
Crazy! Triple braced!

I had a Tama hihaht stand from that era and I recently sold it. After 25 years of use, it worked just as good as the day I got it.
I was remarking to a friend about the demise of my old Titan throne- he said "that's Tama for you- after 20 years they just go to s___ on you."

I don't think the triple braced thing lasted very long- everyone involved started feeling a little bit silly.
 

Aeolian

Platinum Member
The heaviest, most overbuilt things I've seen are Tama. I have a couple of Tama stands still. One I use for my ride since it's the heaviest cymbal in the kit(especially the K custom dry).

OTOH, I really like the way my DW stands stay where I set them, but still easily adjust.

I was talking to some folks the other day about the old school trick of wrapping a pair of sticks around the wingnut of a stand to get more leverage and try to keep it from slipping. Nowadays with a modern DW stand, you can just snug the lever and it stays there all night.

Isn't progress wonderful.

I don't think you're going to change the sound of the cymbal by making the stand more rigid. It's not like a speaker cabinet. The cymbal is already floating on the stand, decoupled by the felts and spacers. If it wasn't, you'd break it almost instantly.
 

barryabko

Senior Member
I don't think you're going to change the sound of the cymbal by making the stand more rigid. It's not like a speaker cabinet. The cymbal is already floating on the stand, decoupled by the felts and spacers. If it wasn't, you'd break it almost instantly.
Hi Aeolian,

I'm not sure that's quite correct.

The other day I was configuring one of my drum kits using a Gibraltar rack for the mounted toms and all of the cymbals. I noticed that hitting one of the crashes caused the mounted toms to resonate quite a bit in response. To make sure it was not air-borne vibration I mounted that cymbal on a dedicated stand and placed it in the same position. This time it did not cause the nearby toms to resonate. The cymbal went back on the rack-mounted arm and the resonance returned. I then noticed that sympathetic resonance also occurred with the other cymbals but to varying degrees dpending on the size and weight of the cymbal.

The original cymbal was on a rack-mounted arm with felt washers above and below but the wing nut was not tightened down too much (I like my cymbals to sway as much as they need when struck). The felts and spacers certainly didn't decouple the cymbal sufficiently when it was on the rack arm.

Barry
 

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
Hi Chonson,

Thank you for your comment.

The static weight of a cymbal may be only a few pounds but the dynamic weight of the cymbal at the moment of inertia (when it is struck) is much different. In addition, the amount of energy that is created and needs to dissipate over a several second period is also much greater. I believe that the more rigid the stand the more effectively it can allow the cymbal to create and maintain the acoustic wavelaunch. In other words, it allows the cymbal to create a more dynamic percussive soundwave and also allows the decay and overtones to be more fully realized.

Best,

Barry
So, what does your kit sound like when you play with the band? I'm wondering what kind of clubs you're playing in that compensate for the amount of tweezing you're doing. I wonder if people still spill beer there. Is this for that open spot in the Steely Dan band?

I kid, of course ;)
 
Hi Chonson,

Thank you for your comment.

The static weight of a cymbal may be only a few pounds but the dynamic weight of the cymbal at the moment of inertia (when it is struck) is much different. In addition, the amount of energy that is created and needs to dissipate over a several second period is also much greater. I believe that the more rigid the stand the more effectively it can allow the cymbal to create and maintain the acoustic wavelaunch. In other words, it allows the cymbal to create a more dynamic percussive soundwave and also allows the decay and overtones to be more fully realized.

Best,

Barry
With all respect, I really think you're over-thinking this one...
 

caddywumpus

Platinum Member
Yamaha also made a stand with a gigantic, 4-foot base.
I have one of these! It has a huge counterweight and a telescoping boom. The cymbal is over 12 feet off the ground when fully extended upward! I use it mostly in a "T" formation as a rack for musicals and as a baffle brace in the studio. The thing is a BEAST!!!
 

sqadan

Senior Member
I had a gigantic Tama boom stand in the early 90's that had the big metal counterweight at the end of the boom... man that thing was heavy and over built. I think I could have raised the cymbal up like 15 feet with it.

Tama's hardware has always been heavy and massive. My current Premier hardware is pretty darn heavy too... my hardware case is like a coffin with a dead body in it lol.
 

barryabko

Senior Member
Thank you all for your comments.

I just ordered a DW 8700 boom cymbal stand. It is supposed to be extremely heavy duty. I will post my opinion once I receive it and compare to some of my other stands.

Link: My link

Barry
 

MikeM

Platinum Member
Hi Chonson,

Thank you for your comment.

The static weight of a cymbal may be only a few pounds but the dynamic weight of the cymbal at the moment of inertia (when it is struck) is much different. In addition, the amount of energy that is created and needs to dissipate over a several second period is also much greater. I believe that the more rigid the stand the more effectively it can allow the cymbal to create and maintain the acoustic wavelaunch. In other words, it allows the cymbal to create a more dynamic percussive soundwave and also allows the decay and overtones to be more fully realized.

Best,

Barry
I was reading recently on another forum about some jazz drummers who were smitten with DWs 6000 series hardware because of the way their cymbals sounded on them.

I'm a believer that racks are horrible for transmitting vibrations from one part of your kit to another and that it's very noticeable and annoying. One of the many reasons why I've never used one.

I started life thinking that Tama Titan stands from the '80s were the way to go I still have a few around, but I've long since stopped buying hardware that heavy. I like Tama's new hardware just fine - they've toned it down quite a bit since then.

I might try those DW 6000s though.
 

Aeolian

Platinum Member
Interesting, that DW stands (at least the ones I have) decouple the cymbal from the stand with that plastic thing on top. I wonder if those folks enamored of the sound of their stands have tried putting the DW bit on other stands.
 

brady

Platinum Member
I was reading recently on another forum about some jazz drummers who were smitten with DWs 6000 series hardware because of the way their cymbals sounded on them.

I'm a believer that racks are horrible for transmitting vibrations from one part of your kit to another and that it's very noticeable and annoying. One of the many reasons why I've never used one.

I started life thinking that Tama Titan stands from the '80s were the way to go I still have a few around, but I've long since stopped buying hardware that heavy. I like Tama's new hardware just fine - they've toned it down quite a bit since then.

I might try those DW 6000s though.
I remember reading an old DW edge magazine in which Peter Erskine was advocating the benefits of flat-based stands after he heard how his cymbals sounded on them.

I've never checked it out personally, but I have heard some nice sounding cymbals on flat-base stands. Who knows how they would've sounded on regular stands though...
 

Pocket-full-of-gold

Platinum Member
The static weight of a cymbal may be only a few pounds but the dynamic weight of the cymbal at the moment of inertia (when it is struck) is much different. In addition, the amount of energy that is created and needs to dissipate over a several second period is also much greater. I believe that the more rigid the stand the more effectively it can allow the cymbal to create and maintain the acoustic wavelaunch. In other words, it allows the cymbal to create a more dynamic percussive soundwave and also allows the decay and overtones to be more fully realized.
Gotta agree with the "over thinking" call. Your reasoning may be sound on a minute level, but not very practical in a day to day musical setting, IMHO.

What happens when that Marshall amplifier buries that tiny extra amount of decay? Negates the need for your cymbals to be supported by the Eiffel Tower, I would have thought. :)
 

Octaplus

Junior Member
Hi Chonson,

Thank you for your comment.

The static weight of a cymbal may be only a few pounds but the dynamic weight of the cymbal at the moment of inertia (when it is struck) is much different. In addition, the amount of energy that is created and needs to dissipate over a several second period is also much greater. I believe that the more rigid the stand the more effectively it can allow the cymbal to create and maintain the acoustic wavelaunch. In other words, it allows the cymbal to create a more dynamic percussive soundwave and also allows the decay and overtones to be more fully realized.

Best,

Barry
Dude you are dead on, I make my living doing structural engineering of a day and gig all night. I'm an Idiophone freak owning hundreds of cymbals and I measure the frequency with an Oscilloscope to prove my point about homonics and substained tonality. The more ridgid the stand the longer the substain as to the strength of material and the inertia ( force applied) I even use hard rubber washers just below the wear factor of the metal alloy tolerance to elongate the waves during orchestral movements where the Director will participate in my percussive methods. I hope somebody reads this old post because you are dead on with your belief!
 
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