Best Microphone for a bass drum

PorkPieGuy

Platinum Member
I've used an EV Re20, an AKG D112 (I own this one), and an Audix D6. The EV mic is awesome and would be a "forever mic" in my book if I could afford it. I've had my D112 for almost 25 years, and it doesn't disappoint. Here's the thing about the D6. First, it's a great microphone. If you like the sound that it gives through a PA system and in recording, then great! You'll be very happy with it. With that said, if you ever want to manipulate how the kick sounds, I feel the pre-eq on the D6 is pretty heavy. It's a great no-brainer mic; however, you may struggle getting anything different out of it than what you initially hear out of the box. It's a one-trick pony. Now, the trick is REALLY good, but it's still just one trick. I'd be happy with it too out of the road. It's a very no-brainer mic.
 

rebonn

Senior Member
I've used an EV Re20, an AKG D112 (I own this one), and an Audix D6. The EV mic is awesome and would be a "forever mic" in my book if I could afford it. I've had my D112 for almost 25 years, and it doesn't disappoint. Here's the thing about the D6. First, it's a great microphone. If you like the sound that it gives through a PA system and in recording, then great! You'll be very happy with it. With that said, if you ever want to manipulate how the kick sounds, I feel the pre-eq on the D6 is pretty heavy. It's a great no-brainer mic; however, you may struggle getting anything different out of it than what you initially hear out of the box. It's a one-trick pony. Now, the trick is REALLY good, but it's still just one trick. I'd be happy with it too out of the road. It's a very no-brainer mic.
I also have the EV RE-20. I actually favor it over most of the others for bass except the EV ND68 which has the EQ curve that I think is a little more suited for the bass. The RE 20 has a flat response but more gain before feedback and I've used it on just about everything. You can really crank the gain up and still have a low noise floor.
 

WallyY

Platinum Member
I don’t have enough direct experience with different mics. Just from what I can glean off videos and recordings.
I have an ATM25 for bass drum recording.
I wanted a full sound without too much of anything.
It seemed like it would sit in a mix better than something with an opinionated sound.
What I need is proper monitors. Headphones don’t do justice to a bass drum, no matter what kind of phones are used.
 

jdavis

Member
A few of my favorites would be:

Sennheiser 441
Sennheiser 421
AKG D112 / D12
Shure SM7B

Never cared for the Beta52 or the D6 (yuck), LOL
 

PorkPieGuy

Platinum Member
Shure SM7B
Wow, this seems like it would be a great kick drum mic. Never thought to try one of these. A friend of mine has one of these in his studio for vocals, and you really have to "punch" it vocally. It's not a great mic for quiet singers, but a confident singer can absolutely rock this thing.
 

trickg

Silver Member
I've had the EV ND68 on the kick for years and haven't been able to find a better mic yet. I'm sure there's one out there somewhere.
Based on the reading I've done, I'm not sure there is. I think that it ends up falling to the wayside of what I refer to as the "big 3" of kick drum mics - the AKG D112, the Shure Beta 52 and the Audix D6 - that it doesn't get a lot of notice. I was looking into this mic when it was still designated as the N/D 868 - I understand that there were some minor changes when they revamped it to the ND 68, but nothing that took away anything from the great performer that it is.

Speaking of the "big 3," I think if someone was looking for a kick mic for live use in a Rock setting, the Audix D6 keeps things pretty simple. That mic doesn't seem to need much help - you set it up, plug it in, and it's already pre-EQ'd for a pretty specific thump that works really well in a rock setting. I mentioned before that it's distinctive to the point where if I am in a club during sound check, I immediately know if it's a D6 on the kick, and it almost always is - it just seems to be the kick mic of choice for live venues doing rock music.

Wow, this [Shure SM7B] seems like it would be a great kick drum mic. Never thought to try one of these. A friend of mine has one of these in his studio for vocals, and you really have to "punch" it vocally. It's not a great mic for quiet singers, but a confident singer can absolutely rock this thing.
In the fiddling I've done recording drums in my home studio, I use this mic, mainly because it's what I have, but it also works pretty well. I think the thing that helps it is the quality of sound you get from it - it really is a good mic. I bought it for my home studio because I wanted a microphone I could use for anything, particularly vocals and trumpet, and it works well with that, but EQ'd for the kick drum, it got me where I wanted to go, or at least it did for my meager recording skills and knowledge.

This is a demo vid of sorts my friend and I put together for this little crummy band project I was a part of for a short time. We wanted to show the singer and bass player that we didn't necessarily need to go to a studio to get something usable for demo recordings, and they could be done in my basement. In any case, I did some light reading about recording drums and utilizing a 4 mic setup (Audix FS15 overheads in Recorderman setup) a snare mic (SM57) and kick (Shure SM7B) this is what I wound up with. (I literally just duplicated settings from an article I read as closely as I could in terms of EQ, compression and reverb - seemed to get me in the ballpark)

 

jdavis

Member
Wow, this seems like it would be a great kick drum mic. Never thought to try one of these. A friend of mine has one of these in his studio for vocals, and you really have to "punch" it vocally. It's not a great mic for quiet singers, but a confident singer can absolutely rock this thing.
Yeah, to me it's like a super-57. Great on snare, too :)

This is a demo vid of sorts my friend and I put together for this little crummy band project I was a part of for a short time. We wanted to show the singer and bass player that we didn't necessarily need to go to a studio to get something usable for demo recordings, and they could be done in my basement. In any case, I did some light reading about recording drums and utilizing a 4 mic setup (Audix FS15 overheads in Recorderman setup) a snare mic (SM57) and kick (Shure SM7B) this is what I wound up with. (I literally just duplicated settings from an article I read as closely as I could in terms of EQ, compression and reverb - seemed to get me in the ballpark)

Sounds good! (y)
 
If it wasn't that expensive, I would prefer an EV RE20 over many others.
Due to financials I bought an Audix D6 instead, and though it isn't an all purpose microphone, it produces a rock solid rock sound without effort.
 

KarlCrafton

Platinum Member
I was in the studio this past weekend, and we tried an RE20.
It was OK, but we changed to a D112, and I liked it a lot more.

It's all in what you like to hear, because most mics will give you a nice sound to begin with, but once you start to hear differences in character, you'll prefer certain mics over others.
I'm not a fan of the 52 because it always seems "boofy" to me, but that's me. Lots of people really like that one.
68354547_2967331943293799_7613382169896943616_n.jpg
I didn't take a pic after we changed the mic.
 

KarlCrafton

Platinum Member
We used that same RE20 on my snare (6.5 Black Beauty) on our last CD and it was pretty nice, but I prefer the sound a 57 gets.
That's what we used this time top and bottom.
 
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