Beginner with no drumset and no definite ideas about what to do

El Gos Coix

Junior Member
Hi everybody,

As this is my first message here I'll begin by introducing myself. I'm from Spain and I'd like to be a 35-year-old Ringo Starr. Considering that I'll be 36 in less than three months, and that I've just started playing the drums (with the lack of intensity common in someone of my age), I don't think I'll manage that. I'll be happy if I get to be a 58-year-old Ringo Starr! Anyway, as I said, I've been playing drums for four weeks, one hour per week (I don't own a drumset, so that's all I can afford on a rented one). The only thing worth mentioning, up to know, is that I play left handed. I'm not left handed, but I'm a piano player, and all the jewels in the crown would not persuade me that it's normal to have the bass toms to my right and the treble ones to my left! In this short time I've realized that I like the drums and that I don't lack all coordination, so I'd like to keep on learning. And I would like to ask you some advice.

A friend of mine has told me of a vacancy for a drummer at her band. I've told her that I cannot play the drums, but they don't seem to care. They prefer having a bad drummer to not having a drummer at all. It seems that the leader of that band is someone who has recorded a lot of songs playing all the instruments himself, but now he'd like to play those songs live, and he needs other people. All the songs, including the drum parts, are written, so I wouldn't have to make up patterns of my own, but just play what's written (maybe simplifying it a bit at the beginning). Fortunately, I can read drum tabs, and the songs are not very quick. What I wouldn't be able to do would be to study using the set; I'd only be able to play it during rehearsals with the band, because I haven't got a car (and the band rehearses in another town).

So here goes my first question: do you think this may be a good opportunity, or do you think it would be frustrating? Would you join in, or wait until I can really play a little, and then look for another band? (I don't think there can much trouble finding a band that wants a drummer.)

Next question: so far, all my equipment consists of two drumsticks and a practice pad. What I really like are acoustic drumsets, but I'm considering the idea of buying an electronic drumset. First of all, if I joined the band I mentioned, I'd need it, since it seems that they have really big space problems where they rehearse, and there's no way to get an acoustic set in there. The set would have to be dismantled and put aside every time. Besides, if I ever quit that band and have to keep the set at home while I look for another place to have it, the need for an electronic set would be even greater, since I simply cannot get a normal drumset at home. Apart from that, it would be impossible to rehearse at home with an acoustic set if I ever want to do so, owing to the noise. An electronic set would allow me to play with headphones; it would also have the advantage -in the case I joined the band- that it would allow us to rehearse at low volumes, thus protecting our ears (I'm really concerned about that). So everything seems to point in the direction of an electronic drumset... Except for the fact that I dislike them. I cannot afford an expensive, good set, so I'm afraid that the cheap one I'd get would sound too electronic for my taste. Apart from that, I wonder whether there's much difference between both kinds of sets.

Maybe I'm worrying too much about unimportant things, but I see electronic sets are more expensive, and I wouldn't like to waste my money for not knowing well what to do. Would you please recommend me anything? And, also, would anyone tell me how much space an electronic drumset takes up when completely dismantled? I'd like to know whether there's any real possibility to cram it into my home if I happen not to be rehearsing anywhere else.

Thanks a lot in advance.
 

zakhopper316

Silver Member
i think the most important thing for you is to get some kind of set. look at yamaha and
rolland electric sets, they are the best in my opinion, even the cheapest ones are decent
some of the others out there are more like toys and you dont want that. if you have a
practice pad you should be practicing your rudiments, very important.

i think you should join the band, even if it doesn't go well ,playing with people is a very
important part of drumming. you will gain valuable. experience .
 

Blk Diamond

Senior Member
Hi El Gos Coix,

Welcome to DrummerWorld!

I agree with everything that Zak said.
If an electric kit fits your needs at this time, then that is what you should buy.
You can always expand to a acoustic kit when the time is right. However, an electric kit is way better than no kit at all.
As for playing with your friends band, I say go for it. A learning experience like that can only help you in becoming a better drummer.
Plus, it is fun playing with others, or at least it should be.
 

Migaluch

Senior Member
I think you'll have an easy time learning the drums. I'm only a beginner too, so i can't really help you too much. Anyways, welcome to Drummerworld!
 

El Gos Coix

Junior Member
Thanks everybdy for your advice. I really had no idea whether it was mad of me to think of joining a band with so little experience, but as you say, it'll be a good way to learn. I'll look for one of those electronic sets suggested by Zak (and keep my fingers crossed for being able to afford one!)

I hope to come back here the proud owner of a drumset!
 

Davo-London

Gold Member
Say yes to every opportunity.

You will soon be told if you don't fit in or you're not good enough.

The lower the Roland number the smaller the kit!

So a TD1 is tiny and if you cannot fit one of these in your home then you must be a battery chicken!

Buy used and go for TD4 or TD6 or TD9. These will get you going nicely. Also with electronic kits, swapping the kick drum from Left to Right just requires changing a few connectors.

Only downside is to play with other musos you will also need an amplifier/combo. Get a cheap bass amp with a tweeter. The Roland amps are great but expensive.

Where I have written Roland substitute with Yamaha also.

Davo
 

dairyairman

Platinum Member
i'd say definitely join that band. you're lucky to have friends who need a drummer and don't care how good you are. that sounds like a perfect opportunity!

for amplifying your electronic kit, if your band has a PA, you can always plug your electronic kit into that.
 

El Gos Coix

Junior Member
Oh, I hadn't realized I'd need amplification for the electronic kit! Or that I'n need to modify it so as to play left-handed! I'm glad to know it can be done (I hope it's easy, since I'm not well versed in this kind of things).

I asked what the cheapest Yamaha and Roland models would be, and they're the Yamaha DTXplorer and the Roland HD-1. Do you think any of those would do? They look small and with everything crammed together. I suppose one gets to be a good shot after playing on one of those!

I've also been searching for second-hand e-kit, but the problem is that I suspect they're selling them too expensive. I haven't found any of the two sets I mentioned above second-hand, but those I've seen are not cheaper than brand-new ones at the web site where I've looked them up (http://www.thomann.de). Either this shop sells very cheap, or people have got a cheek!

Just another question: I've seen that many kits are sold along with headphones. Why? Are they a protection for one's ears against the noise, or are they for listening to what you're playing?
 

harryconway

Platinum Member
Welcome to Drummerworld. The Yamaha DTXpress and DTXplorer are the "more affordable" Yamaha kits, and as for Roland, the smaller the number, the older and more affordable the kit.​
You can reference pricing on eBay, as well as buy off of there.​
Not to de-rail you from your dreams of becoming Ringo (I mean, who doesn't?), but are you familiar with Jan Hammer? Amazing keyboard player. And drummer. He scored "Miami Vice", did tons of work with Jeff Beck, and has had quite a successful career. And although he is quite good on a drum set (I've seen him), he feels way more comfortable playing drum parts on keyboard. Like I stated. Not to dissuade you from a drum kit, but your lifestyle might support a keyboard/synthesizer/drum station better that an e-kit. Just food for thought.​
 

Pollyanna

Platinum Member
EGC, since you're a rank beginner and the band's rehearsal space is very small, another option would be to just have a hi-hat, kick drum, snare and a crash/ride cymbal (18" or so).

Getting organised with fills on the toms takes time and I expect the group will be happy if you just keep steady time at the correct volume.
 

Davo-London

Gold Member
Pollyanna speaks the truth: snare, kick, ride and hihat.

Check out Jojo Mayer's New York Grooves on youtube if you don't believe us:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VGwIzdNfI9k

Also, the headphones are so you can hear the electronic drums!

I would not advise the TD1 as the pedals are built in and feel completely different from acoustic drum pedals. So much in fact that I struggle to play the TD1.



Davo
 

dairyairman

Platinum Member
I would not advise the TD1 as the pedals are built in and feel completely different from acoustic drum pedals. So much in fact that I struggle to play the TD1.
you mean the Roland HD-1? if so, then yes i agree. that thing is ultra compact, but hard to play because of the goofy pedals.
 

zakhopper316

Silver Member
Oh, I hadn't realized I'd need amplification for the electronic kit! Or that I'n need to modify it so as to play left-handed! I'm glad to know it can be done (I hope it's easy, since I'm not well versed in this kind of things).

I asked what the cheapest Yamaha and Roland models would be, and they're the Yamaha DTXplorer and the Roland HD-1. Do you think any of those would do? They look small and with everything crammed together. I suppose one gets to be a good shot after playing on one of those!

I've also been searching for second-hand e-kit, but the problem is that I suspect they're selling them too expensive. I haven't found any of the two sets I mentioned above second-hand, but those I've seen are not cheaper than brand-new ones at the web site where I've looked them up (http://www.thomann.de). Either this shop sells very cheap, or people have got a cheek!

Just another question: I've seen that many kits are sold along with headphones. Why? Are they a protection for one's ears against the noise, or are they for listening to what you're playing?
hey im a lefty too, its really easy to switch the brain and pads to the other side, took
me about 10 minutes to switch them to lefty,

and you dont need an amp at first just to practice, you can use headphones
 

El Gos Coix

Junior Member
Thank you very much everyone. I'm feeling much more confident now, because I was missing some advice from people who really know about this.

I do like Pollyana's suggestion of a minimum kit to begin with. I'll try to consult the leader of the band about it, because although I think that wouldn't be a problem space-wise -that great Jojo Mayer uses a tiny bass drum!-, maybe he wouldn't be too happy about not having toms (as I told you, I think he wants to reproduce exactly what he recorded himself, and as I haven't listened to the songs yet, I don't know whether there's much tom work going on). I'm not very confident myself about being able to play fills (not even about being able to play a steady beat!), but if I'm expected to do so after not a very long time, I wouldn't be able to expand the acoustic kit (for the space reasons).

Thanks a lot, too, for your warning about the pedals of the Roland e-kit. I'd go for the Yamaha if I finally decided to get one of these. And sorry for my stupid question about the headphones! I thought that the electronic drums made enough noise to practice and rehearse, and that when you mentioned the amplifier it was in the case that one wanted to play gigs with amplified instruments. And Zak, thanks for telling me it's that easy to make the kit left-handed.

Harry, thanks for your suggestion about keyboard drums, which I hadn't though of. It would definitely solve all space and transport problems, but I'll keep that as a last option in case I cannot do anything better. This is because I think it wouldn't be very rewarding for me. I have all respect for people who can play drums that way (I don't think it's easy at all), but it's not what I'd like to do. I mean, making music with other people is always a rewarding experience, but I like the idea of learning to play a new instrument from scratch, even if I'd likely be able to play more complex things on keyboard in a much shorter time. Joining this band would be a great effort in any case (apart from my 40-hours-a-week job, I spend four and a half hours commuting each day), so I want to make sure that I do exactly what I want to do. But, as I said, it's good to be aware of that possibility.
 
Top