Bass Drum Work for Bossa/Latin

Cavalol

Junior Member
Hey there guys! So, i've been invited to start rehersing with a jazz trio that does some Bossa Nova on the side!

I am currently having some issues keeping the bass drum tight (These didn't really stand out when i only practiced alone, but really do when i'm playing in a group).

Any tips/excercises/books i can check out that are good sources for bass drum work?

Thanks in advance!
 

vxla

Silver Member
If you are playing the generic bass drum/hi-hat pattern of "1 +a2 +a3 +a4 +a" etc., then sitting down and work out the following:

1. Add more emphasis on the upbeat on the hi-hat. Rock your heel on the downbeats.
2. Play 16th notes with your hands over the foot pattern. Play something easy and light; listen to your feet, not your hands.
3. Try keeping your heel down and don't let the beater come off the bass drum head too far.
4. Add emphasis on the beats in the bass drum, not on the "a".
 

SmoothOperator

Gold Member
Hey there guys! So, i've been invited to start rehersing with a jazz trio that does some Bossa Nova on the side!

I am currently having some issues keeping the bass drum tight (These didn't really stand out when i only practiced alone, but really do when i'm playing in a group).

Any tips/excercises/books i can check out that are good sources for bass drum work?

Thanks in advance!
It could have more to do with the group. I've had mixed results with the samba/bossa bass pattern. Mostly In the USA musicians don't get it, though it should be part of the Jazz lexicon. There was that one bassist that really knew what to do with it at a jam. The better jazz drummers that I've seen usually fluffed the bass, and didn't really have a solid Brazillian feel that locks in on the bass drum. I think they were aiming for mediocrity in support of chord changes. Probably because that is what the bands want, because the guitarists don't have all that great of grip on the rhythms involved in finger playing and Bossa. Just my observations.
 

Cavalol

Junior Member
It could have more to do with the group. I've had mixed results with the samba/bossa bass pattern. Mostly In the USA musicians don't get it, though it should be part of the Jazz lexicon. There was that one bassist that really knew what to do with it at a jam. The better jazz drummers that I've seen usually fluffed the bass, and didn't really have a solid Brazillian feel that locks in on the bass drum. I think they were aiming for mediocrity in support of chord changes. Probably because that is what the bands want, because the guitarists don't have all that great of grip on the rhythms involved in finger playing and Bossa. Just my observations.
Nah, the fellas are good! It's a Double Bass and a Piano, and the pianist is tight! My bass drum is legit bad, my leg troubles don't help, but i never actually worked hard on my feet!
 

toddbishop

Platinum Member
You can try breaking it up-- play just half notes (assuming 4/4), or just on 3 (or &-3), or on the & of 2/& of 4. The stock rhythm gets pretty tedious played too regularly and too loud all night. As a general thing you can emphasize one part or another in different sections of the song, rather than feeling like you have to play the full 4-limb textbook drumset beat the whole time. But also you should just practice your bossa and samba a lot. It's kind of a primary thing for getting your bass drum chops together.

I put out a little style guide for playing bossa nova and samba in a combo setting, in print and e-book format. Knowing a few rhythms and a few key concepts it's fairly easy to make the experience of playing the style a lot more musical and fun for everyone involved.
 

T.L.

Senior Member
You can try breaking it up-- play just half notes (assuming 4/4), or just on 3 (or &-3), or on the & of 2/& of 4. The stock rhythm gets pretty tedious played too regularly and too loud all night. As a general thing you can emphasize one part or another in different sections of the song, rather than feeling like you have to play the full 4-limb textbook drumset beat the whole time. But also you should just practice your bossa and samba a lot. It's kind of a primary thing for getting your bass drum chops together.

I put out a little style guide for playing bossa nova and samba in a combo setting, in print and e-book format. Knowing a few rhythms and a few key concepts it's fairly easy to make the experience of playing the style a lot more musical and fun for everyone involved.
Listen to Todd for sure, and pick up his book. I play a lot of bossas with a group I play with and Todd's book has been invaluable in giving me some new ideas, patterns and approaches to work with.
 

Cavalol

Junior Member
Thanks for all the answers! I'll check out Todd's Book for sure! And i'm checking the videos out right now
 

Richard.Awesome

Senior Member
set the metronome at 30bpm, and start with the RF, then at the LF, RH, LH. only speed up when you can control them all separately
 
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