Bass drum EQ......what a b****!

Zoofie

Senior Member
Hey guys!!!
Having some real problems getting the right bass sound. It either sounds to deep with no punch or to hollow. The mic it right next to the batter head pointing directly to the beater(s). I've been fiddling around with the EQ but still can't get it. Im wondering if anyone EQ's there bass drum on the mixer direct (because i can't multitrack) , and could tell me how much they would boost/cut the highs , lows and mids?
Thanks alot! :):)
 
M

Mediocrefunkybeat

Guest
Please use one thread. This is about the sixth. I'll give you some more specific advice on your original thread if you post the question there.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
Mic the resonant head. If there's a hole in the reso head, put the capsule of the mic just inside it, pointed not right at but generally where the beater hits the batter. If the reso is unported, I like to put the bass drum mic within 2" of the outer edge of the head, and about an inch or 2 away from the surface of the head. In my experience, micing an unported reso head near the middle of the head picks up really boomy crap sounding frequencies. It's much punchier miced near the edge, again, my opinion.
 
T

trkdrmr

Guest
Mic the resonant head. If there's a hole in the reso head, put the capsule of the mic just inside it, pointed not right at but generally where the beater hits the batter. If the reso is unported, I like to put the bass drum mic within 2" of the outer edge of the head, and about an inch or 2 away from the surface of the head. In my experience, micing an unported reso head near the middle of the head picks up really boomy crap sounding frequencies. It's much punchier miced near the edge, again, my opinion.
I think that's what I just found out. I have been recording from the batter and reso side. The reso side results in deeper sound, but definitely must stay toward the edge.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
Yea, you figure, if you're micing the batter head, when the beater hits the head, the head is traveling away from the kick mic diaphram, when you mic the reso side, the batter head is moving towards the kick mic diaphram, resulting in what should be a punchier sound.
 

Vipercussionist

Silver Member
Yea, you figure, if you're micing the batter head, when the beater hits the head, the head is traveling away from the kick mic diaphragm, when you mic the reso side, the batter head is moving towards the kick mic diaphragm, resulting in what should be a punchier sound.
I believe he was micing the batter head from INSIDE the drum?? If he was, the head would be moving towards the mic.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
You could be right, I took it as he was micing near the footpedal. Zoofie, was the mic inside the drum or outside the drum?
 

Zoofie

Senior Member
Sorry MFD mate , i didn't understand what you said. I'll just keep it to this thread.
Yes , i am micing it inside the bassdrum about 2" away from the batter head pointing directly at the beater. Its just not giving the 'punch' sound im after , it sounds a bit cardboard like. Would you suggest to mic is further away? But the problem is i don't want to much 'boom to it. I still want it punchy and a bit 'slappy' , so give the typical double bass drum sound.
Cheers!

P.S Don't worry i won't make more threads!
 
Put it just a few inches inside the port, aimed at the beaters. Slightly boost around 100hZ, cut everything using a narrow bandwith (should probably be a knob labeled bandwidth or "Q" around 300-400hZ, add around 5dB at 5000-7000hZ. The slight boost at 100hZ will add a little body, 300-400hZ is that horrible cardboard frequency you are hearing, and 5000-7000hZ is that slappy, click attack you're looking for.
 

PQleyR

Platinum Member
That will depend on the particular note your drum makes, of course...experiment! Always experiment!
 
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