Ash steam bent & oak driftwood stave beauties.

keep it simple

Platinum Member
Two little crackers from the London Drum show.


Clear lacquer finish fusion kit.

6mm thick ash steam bent solid shells
22 x 16 bass
14 x 12 floor tom
12 x 7 rack tom
14 x 5 snare


Driftwood finish bop kit.

9mm thick oak stave shells
18 x 14 bass drum
14 x12 floor tom
12 x 7 rack tom
13 x 5 snare
 

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tamadrm

Platinum Member
You do some nice work there fella.Beautiful drums,and when(not if)I hit the lottery,you wlill have my business.Cheers

Steve B
 

keep it simple

Platinum Member
Thanks guys! Of course, these are built by Dean Price, not me, but as I'm part of what's going on, I'm very proud & excited by these drums. Both have their own distinct character, but the stand out star for me, is the bass drum on the steam bent solid ash kit. Almost too much tone, if that's possible :)
 

Elliot

Member
Just came across this thread, as I'm looking into a steam bent kit right now and the builder mentioned ash. Can anyone tell me some properties of ash, or more specifically steamed ash?

What I'm after is something that sounds really good at low volume (though maybe not only low volume), in bop sizes, approximately. I don't actually play jazz, but those are the sizes I prefer, though I'm not sure about 18" or 20" kick yet.
He told me ash would be something in between maple and birch, which sounds awesome to me. I am pretty uninformed on wood characteristics, though, and would love some ideas on this topic.

Frankly, I figure if Guru is making steam bent Ash then it's probably OK.
 
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keep it simple

Platinum Member
Just came across this thread, as I'm looking into a steam bent kit right now and the builder mentioned ash. Can anyone tell me some properties of ash, or more specifically steamed ash?

What I'm after is something that sounds really good at low volume (though maybe not only low volume), in bop sizes, approximately. I don't actually play jazz, but those are the sizes I prefer, though I'm not sure about 18" or 20" kick yet.
He told me ash would be something in between maple and birch, which sounds awesome to me. I am pretty uninformed on wood characteristics, though, and would love some ideas on this topic.

Frankly, I figure if Guru is making steam bent Ash then it's probably OK.
Elliott, our Origin series Classic range is steam bent English ash. Of course, the Origin construction is quite different to a standard construction, but we chose English ash as it offers exactly the characteristics we require for a classic character - only better. A good steam bent construction always gives you your best shot at a satisfying low dynamic tone. In other words, steam bent shells excite far more readily than other constructions. Care must be taken to keep hardware mass low to get the best from the drums. We also chose ash for our new In-Tense snare drum series for precisely the same reasons.

Regarding ash as being somewhere between maple & birch is roughly correct. It has the midrange of maple, but with more bottom end, & is typically brighter too. It has a longer voice than either maple or birch. Like all fine quality builds though, how it's constructed plays a big part in the resultant sound. Not all steam bent constructions are the same. Just because something is steam bent, doesn't automatically mean it's going to be great, although it's a good starting point. Is your builder buying his shells from Vaughncraft? Most do. If so, the shell quality is usually good, but your builder must select them with care, as they're not always consistent. If he's making his own, then good on him, but try to play a set or view his recordings first.

We prefer naturally cured english ash. We've compared it to kiln dried European ash, & also NA swamp ash, & it delivers more consistently, but all ash is great for drums in our opinion.

Here's a few links of our little Origin ash bop kit. In both cases, fitted with G1 coated heads. They can rock up big time if fitted with clear heads. Bass drum is only 12" deep! Listen through good cans. No EQ or processing:



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uoGLAH1kYIc&feature=youtu.be&hd=1
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-FZQuLQuZG0&feature=youtu.be&hd=1

Recorded last week on our show stand using a Zoom Q3 handy cam http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Ohdyj2HDZs&feature=youtu.be&hd=1




Oh, & we chose English ash for our new series snares too. Here's a couple of pictures so you can see how ash looks in a natural finish:

1/ In-Tense steam bent.
2/ In-Tense & ovangkol segmented.
3/ English ash arriving at our shop for long term curing (stave & segmented). We take steam bent from milled boards.

With the amount of ash we use, it's pretty obvious what our opinion of ash is. Fantastic wood species choice, & with steam bent shells, wood species selection makes such a difference - go for it :)
 

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keep it simple

Platinum Member
Andy the heart wood in those ash blocks is obviously a different color ...almost redish....would you guys use this wood in other areas of building ..such as segmented hoops....stave... for two examples
Absolutely! It's good stuff. We use anything that brings the right characteristics to the party.
 

Elliot

Member
Yeah, definitely drooled over those videos already, haha! Thanks for all the info on ash/steam bent shells, Andy. As usual your post was highly enlightening!
I didn't realize that kick was so small! Thanks for mentioning the size, if I could get away with a 12"x18" that would be great. I would love to have a small powerhouse like that, so much sound in so little space!
The drums I'm looking at are Green Mountain, and they build their own, not Vaughncraft as far as I know. They seem to have very low-mass hardware indeed, which they also make in-house.
I'm planning to give the drums a go before I buy them, thanks for pointing out the obvious, which I may have ignored in my excitement!
I'm not sure now what specific type of ash would be used, but it seems like it could be the perfect choice for me. I'll know when I get to play some!
Would that I could afford a Guru kit/snare! I've been reading about the In-Tense line since you started mentioning it, and I'm quite excited to hear some examples! It seems like you Guru guys are really pushing the envelope of what a drum can do and sound like in all the right ways!
Thanks again!
 

keep it simple

Platinum Member
I didn't realize that kick was so small! Thanks for mentioning the size, if I could get away with a 12"x18" that would be great. I would love to have a small powerhouse like that, so much sound in so little space!
The drums I'm looking at are Green Mountain, and they build their own, not Vaughncraft as far as I know. They seem to have very low-mass hardware indeed, which they also make in-house.
Our 12" deep 20" bass drum "gets away with it" because of it's unique construction. In standard format, even in steam bent form, I would strongly suggest 14" depth as being more suitable. I don't think even we would make a 12" deep 18" bass drum, & I certainly wouldn't suggest that in a standard shell construction. Again. for 18", I'd suggest 14" depth as being a minimum, probably 16" depth being optimum if the drums are used mostly without being mic'd. Overall, if you play unmic'd, & play a range of material, you'll have much more bass drum depth options in 20" size than in 18" size.

I looked up Green Mountain's site. Interesting. Pity there's not a lot of information on there. The hardware looks nice, but it's mass is fairly high - being stainless steel. Their observations about the properties of stainless are correct to a degree, but the benefits are measured more against standard cast brass & aluminium parts. either way, I completely applaud their home country hardware manufacture. Good on them!!!!!!

There was one picture of a steam bent snare shell on their site, but it looked like maple. Hoops are ply, but look very well made. I'd be very interested to see & hear your new kit. Interested in pricing too. Be sure to post it up here when you get it :) Good luck with your build. Exciting eh!
 
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