Any shops that will build out a snare shell for me?

incrementalg

Gold Member
I found a guy who can make a milled solid snare shell, but I'm not capable of drilling and affixing the hardware myself. Anyone know of any shops that are willing to sell the hardware, drill and attach it?
 

porter

Platinum Member
I think Terry Thompson has that faculty of producing fully assembled stave snares. I've ordered shells (drilled, edged, and finished) from him before and they're exceptional.
 

keep it simple

Platinum Member
I found a guy who can make a milled solid snare shell, but I'm not capable of drilling and affixing the hardware myself. Anyone know of any shops that are willing to sell the hardware, drill and attach it?
Surely the guy who is making the shell can also finish the drum?
 

GruntersDad

Administrator - Mayor
Staff member
The OP is talking solid shell milled. Not steam bent I assume and not stave. Steam bent is actually single ply and not solid. I would like to see the shell.
 

Vintage Old School

Gold Member
The OP is talking solid shell milled. Not steam bent I assume and not stave. Steam bent is actually single ply and not solid. I would like to see the shell.
Duly noted. I saw that it was a solid milled shell and have no idea why I typed stave in my response. I would still recommend the OP contacting Jeff.
 

konaboy

Pioneer Member
I found a guy who can make a milled solid snare shell, but I'm not capable of drilling and affixing the hardware myself. Anyone know of any shops that are willing to sell the hardware, drill and attach it?
Surely the guy who is making the shell can also finish the drum?
That's what I was thinking. Installing the hardware itself isn't that difficult, the drilling is the hard part. Just order the hardware you'd like to use so they have it for a template to measure. Have them drill the holes then put the hardware on yourself. It's really not hard to do.

Found this doing a quick google search
http://www.drumfactorydirect.com/index.php?main_page=index&cPath=6_9
 

porter

Platinum Member
Oh, if it's a one-piece milled shell (a la that one Canopus snare) that might be more complex. I also assumed stave.
 

incrementalg

Gold Member
The guy making them is in Indonesia and not really a drum builder by trade, so he's not equipped to do the drilling. He's a wood worker who can mill these Indonesian mohagany shells. The shell in the pic above is from him and that one belongs to someone else.

This one will be mine though...
 

Attachments

keep it simple

Platinum Member
A shell like this needs to be treated with great care. True solids can be spectacularly good - or not, it's nature's call on that to quite a degree. Much depends on how it's cured, & partly depending on that, will be build decisions such as: hardware type taking strains into account, hardware fixings allowing for movement, drilling allowing for movement, finishing, etc. This is not something you give to a ply shell assembler, it's something you place in the hands of someone with experience of solid shell constructions.
 

incrementalg

Gold Member
A shell like this needs to be treated with great care. True solids can be spectacularly good - or not, it's nature's call on that to quite a degree. Much depends on how it's cured, & partly depending on that, will be build decisions such as: hardware type taking strains into account, hardware fixings allowing for movement, drilling allowing for movement, finishing, etc. This is not something you give to a ply shell assembler, it's something you place in the hands of someone with experience of solid shell constructions.
Thanks for the input Andy! You've given me good reason to pause on this one.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
That shell reminds me so much of the Canopus Zelkova drum I had. Same thing, a hollowed out log. Canopus states that in this form, shells are inherently weak.

Canopus mills in a radius on the outer part of the shell, so it's not perpendicular to the floor. It's more of a barrel shape for strength when the head gets torqued down.

Canopus kind of states that in the form your shell is....without a radius....it could break. You might have to take great care with that drum. I hope that's not the case because it looks amazing.
 

Tommy_D

Platinum Member
Throw that shell in a free floating basket and call it a day. Sure it adds weight to the overall assembly, but you won't have to drill anything and the only stress the shell will receive is compression from the head tension.
 

incrementalg

Gold Member
Throw that shell in a free floating basket and call it a day. Sure it adds weight to the overall assembly, but you won't have to drill anything and the only stress the shell will receive is compression from the head tension.
I'm thinking the same. I haven't seen any stand alone free floating systems for sale. Anyone know where I can buy one?
 

keep it simple

Platinum Member
I'm thinking the same. I haven't seen any stand alone free floating systems for sale. Anyone know where I can buy one?
The only free floating system I'd consider for such a shell is the one offered by Gary at WAC'D Drums https://www.facebook.com/wacddrumsofficial A Pearl free floating mechanism would absolutely kill any advantage you may get from a solid shell of this type. Even though the shell is fairly thick, it has a resonance profile of a much thinner shell (if we're thinking in ply shell thickness terms), & the mass of the Pearl frame will seriously impair it's performance.

I would advise low mass high quality tube lugs to distribute stresses, holes that allow for a calculated shrinkage depending on curing time / method, & most critically, high quality internal fixings that offer support whilst permitting movement (non of this cheap steel screw & penny washer nonsense that's fitted to many so called high end drums).
 
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