An observation

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
Lately there's been a few threads dealing with dream drum kits.

I find it curious that there are literally no threads dealing with a dream "skill set".

Like all the attention is on the drums and not the drummer.

What's up wit dat?

Great drums don't make you a better player. Maybe a more satisfied player, but not better.
 

8Mile

Platinum Member
I understand the appeal of gear, but it's about 1/1,000th as interesting to me as the playing. I was more-or-less clueless about modern gear until I joined this forum.
 

Mark_S

Silver Member
I think some of it is down to fantasy. You watch another player, and you just want to imagine yourself the same, and somehow the kit looks great and you feel like you could do the same if only you had the same setup, so you copy them.

Also you want to be inspired by the drum sound, and somehow your kit at home never sounds as good as the pros. So you upgrade, and upgrade, thinking if it would just sound that good then I can play that good.

I don't know, that's my thoughts on it. Sometimes its just nice to own gorgeous looking drums and cymbals :)

Sometimes its helpful if the gear inspires you.
 

mmulcahy1

Platinum Member
Lately there's been a few threads dealing with dream drum kits.

I find it curious that there are literally no threads dealing with a dream "skill set".

Like all the attention is on the drums and not the drummer.

What's up wit dat?

Great drums don't make you a better player. Maybe a more satisfied player, but not better.
Who cares about skills, I just want to look cool behind the drums!! ;-)
 

Thunder 42

Silver Member
Drumming techniques, drumming skill, playing music, getting the sound right, drum gear, and communications with like-minded folks - I'm new to the forum and am fascinated to be aboard. I'm learning, and soaking it all in like a sponge while making up for a lot of lost time as I rediscover my passion. And yes, looking cool helps me do all of the above.
 

Seafroggys

Silver Member
Good observation.

I want to be able to get my right foot on par with my feet. Its never been anywhere close in the 15 years I've been playing. I want to be able to play the split sextuplet licks from Good Times Bad Times at tempo.

I also want to be able to play Electric Wheelchair at tempo, but I'm actually close to achieving that goal.
 

Magenta

Platinum Member
The gear is part of the dream, surely. Because if you had your dream kit, you'd also have the skillz that would show it off to its best advantage, wouldn't you? No point having one without the other.

Unless, of course, you're me, sitting sparklily behind your dream kit and not even holding drumsticks:
 

Attachments

Headbanger

Senior Member
Good observation.

I want to be able to get my right foot on par with my feet. Its never been anywhere close in the 15 years I've been playing. I want to be able to play the split sextuplet licks from Good Times Bad Times at tempo.

I also want to be able to play Electric Wheelchair at tempo, but I'm actually close to achieving that goal.
The holy grail for me is Cissy Strut. If I could play with the same feel as the original (not necessarily note-for-note) I'd be happy to play it on somebody's throw-away stencil kit with brass cymbals.

So come on Larry, you started this thread, what's YOUR dream?
 

Smoke

Silver Member
Great drums don't make you a better player. Maybe a more satisfied player, but not better.
Okey-dokey, Mister. Pack up your Gurus, send them to Michigan and let me be the judge. It's probably going to take 20 years to come to a solid conclusion, but I'll let you know. Trust me! ;-)

Heading to the mail box in 3, 2, 1 ...
 

Hollywood Jim

Platinum Member
Okey-dokey, Mister. Pack up your Gurus, send them to Michigan and let me be the judge. It's probably going to take 20 years to come to a solid conclusion, but I'll let you know. Trust me! ;-)

Heading to the mail box in 3, 2, 1 ...

(Yeah, I's gonna' say somepin bout' that. But now I don't hav' ta' )


.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
Coming from someone who owns a drum set that I personally feel is the apex of drum making...I feel I have the best set in the world....I can say without reservation that having the best drumset in the world improved my playing by about 0.05%.

After all it's just a drum like any other, you hit it.

The skills I have been working on are simple. Get my left hand equal to my right hand and get my left foot equal to my right foot in terms of skill. I'm fairly close to that goal, it's taken over a decade, so I need to start thinking about my next big focus.

After I get the physical issues to where I'm happy with them, the one thing I'm not sure how to tackle is my biggest limiting factor, my own ideas. How do you improve one's playing ideas?
 

eclipseownzu

Gold Member
Everybody dreams of owning a nice car, nobody ever dreams of being able to drive like a formula 1 driver. People like expensive, shiny things. There is a status symbol attached to owning expensive things. A bit of exclusivity if you will. Besides, I don't know about you, but I am positive that if I could just get behind Neil Peart's kit I would be magically transformed into a god!
 

Odd-Arne Oseberg

Platinum Member
People buy things for different reasons. Kids want lots of drums, metal heads too, jazzers want a classy traditional thing, people with money just want it because they can..............

There's also the tone which actually does matter to some of us.

This might be inspired by our favourite players, not just for their skills, but part of what we might like is the tone associated with them and a particular kit.

I know, although I'd even like more choices for variation if I could afford it, that my favourite tone has come from Vinnie on USA Customs. Why would I not want that? I'd even like some white ones, not just because of Vinnie(who did get a yellow kit once because of Tony), but it's also simple and classy. Yellow screams a bit too much of Bruce Lee's pants for me. lol Offcourse, if I have several kits, they will be of different colors. Nothing wrong with a pearly white Radio King. :)

If I could have my regular 6-piece + 18 and 20 bass drums in addition to the regular 22 + maybe a 13" tom for a different setup sometimes, that would be my dream kit. 5 toms 3 bassdrums, easy to store easy to transport, something for every occasion. Add some BD resos with pitures of my cats and then gear wouldn't really be a concern unless I had tons of money to burn.

Snare drums is a different matter, but I'm almost covered there. I already have what I need, but a few more auxes and a couple more main classic sounds would be nice.

They are tools made to be used. Sadly my favourite wood snare is my Colaiuta signature, so since it's not made anymore and I like using it, I'd probably get one more if it shows up on ebay. It's the only piece of drum gear I have that would be hard to replace. The rest is readily available. Well, not the TSS, but who cares?
 

tcspears

Gold Member
I understand the appeal of gear, but it's about 1/1,000th as interesting to me as the playing. I was more-or-less clueless about modern gear until I joined this forum.
I'm in the same boat; I've figured out what gear I like through the years, but really just enjoy playing. I get lost when other drummers start going on about gear and technical details. Although, I've gotten better since joining this forum...
 

Jeff Almeyda

Senior Consultant
After I get the physical issues to where I'm happy with them, the one thing I'm not sure how to tackle is my biggest limiting factor, my own ideas. How do you improve one's playing ideas?
Tommy Igoe told me once that not enough teachers teach vocabulary. A great place to start is Louie Bellsons Modern reading text in 4/4. That's where he started me.

Just tap quarters with your foot and play the pages hand to hand. You will be amazed at how many cool rhythmic ideas you wil be introduced to.

Another place is The New Breed by Gary Chester. As a matter of fact you can use the Beloson Book as your melody source for the Chester book.

Do it my nan, you'll thank me
 

8Mile

Platinum Member
I think the best way to get ideas is lots of listening. Listening to different music, different drummers and different musicians, period. You can learn new ideas from a trumpet player as easily as another drummer.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
Thanks Jeff for that thoughtful and useful answer to my question. I'll take your advice and get these texts and start working them. My ideas....I need new ones. I can get my hands and feet together, but I need a little help with the brain lol.

Tommy Igoe told me once that not enough teachers teach vocabulary. A great place to start is Louie Bellsons Modern reading text in 4/4. That's where he started me.

Just tap quarters with your foot and play the pages hand to hand. You will be amazed at how many cool rhythmic ideas you wil be introduced to.

Another place is The New Breed by Gary Chester. As a matter of fact you can use the Beloson Book as your melody source for the Chester book.

Do it my nan, you'll thank me
 

philrudd

Senior Member
I've always felt like an oddball in that I've just never been a gear-head, and truthfully know/understand relatively little about the intricacies of the equipment. I knew I owned a Ludwig kit because of the badges, but I never knew the year until a fellow drummer identified them for me.

Finances have almost always dictated the kind of kit I buy, beyond that, I just tried to get them sounding as good as I could. And truthfully, I've never really felt I was lacking in any department, equipment-wise (skill-wise is a whole 'nother thread...).

The thing is, I've often read about some of my favorite drummers, like Al Jackson Jr. and Benny Benjamin, and how they'd record on beat-up house kits with one dented cymbal and ketchup-stained drum heads - yet they'd manage to extract pure magic.

And I also think of the dozens (hundreds?) of drummers I've run into on tour, who sported kits that cost more than any car I've ever owned - yet couldn't play the things worth a damn.

It's the singer, not the song, and it's the drummer, not the drum. I would never completely discount the quality of the kit, but it's a distant second to how you play said kit.
 
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