After decades, It finally occurred to me...

Fuo

Platinum Member
This doesn't make sense to me... You switch between using the tip and butt of the sticks every few hits?
No, i don't mean spin around front-back (yaw/azimuth), I mean spin around in your hand (roll).

The OP was suggesting that holding the stick so that it hits the head AGAINST the grain would make it last longer. But unless you're holding the sticks with a death grip, then the grain orientation would constantly be shifting (like Tommy Igoe explains at the beginning of the Great Hands DVD when he talks about making "microadjustments" to your grip as you play).
 

Aeolian

Platinum Member
If you're breaking sticks like that, imagine what the shock is doing to your body. Play for 20-30 years like that and there will be trouble.

I did put some heat shrink sleeving on some AJ4s I bought as they just felt too small and awkward. I just put it in the grip area and it effectively enlarged the diameter enough and made them kind non-slip. I suppose you could run it out to the end. But in might dampen the feel of the stick and if you hit hats on the shoulder a lot like I do, it would cut through pretty quick. And the sleeving costs nearly as much as new sticks.

I do like maple sticks though. Less shock and they don't splinter up like hickory. Just chip away until they neck down enough to warrant being tossed.

I did learn decades ago from a great big band drummer that you get volume by getting the stick off the head, rather than bashing into it.
 

Dr_Watso

Platinum Member
No, i don't mean spin around front-back (yaw/azimuth), I mean spin around in your hand (roll).

The OP was suggesting that holding the stick so that it hits the head AGAINST the grain would make it last longer. But unless you're holding the sticks with a death grip, then the grain orientation would constantly be shifting (like Tommy Igoe explains at the beginning of the Great Hands DVD when he talks about making "microadjustments" to your grip as you play).
Oh, gosh... Yea, I think if you're playing right, it's impossible to control the way the grain aligns. Think of how hard you would have to grip those suckers! That's insane.
 

Toolate

Platinum Member
I use to glue my sticks when they had a clean break like in the pic. I took the tape off after the glue had dried though. Some times they lasted a long time after they were glued. That was in the late 70s. I don't break sticks anymore. They just get whittled down till they are flimsy and not much good.
I think it's a great idea lost on most of who just replace what's broken today. Thanks for admitting it. I have only broken one stick so far and didn't glue it but would.
 

Davo-London

Gold Member
I know you won't want to hear this but how about you play more gently instead?

I've broken one stick in 7 years. I've got the opposite problem i.e. way too many sticks on the go.

I know I'm a lightweight, but I agree that the shock/fatigue to your wrist and hand will be racking up.

Peace
Davo
 

vxla

Silver Member
I've broken one stick in 15 years. Sticks like hitting drum heads, not rims. My theory is that instantaneously relaxing the hands after striking anything (especially rim shots) not only saves my wrists, but also sticks.
 

Otto

Platinum Member
My theory is that instantaneously relaxing the hands after striking anything (especially rim shots) not only saves my wrists, but also sticks.
I've found that accelerating the stick then relaxing just before impact gives me great rebound speed/control as well as stick life.

There are times I want a "dry" stick feel on cymbals - by keeping the stick rigid ...and that eats sticks...same when I go for a "dry" rim shot.

I really chew up sticks when I want a dry hihat eighth or sixteenth pattern with a "chirpy" envelope...puts me up on the edge of the hihats from the shoulder of the stick with a fairly tight clamp and dampening them with a rigid impact.

Some sounds demand a little wood sacrifice!
 
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