A look at Ringo Starr’s enduring musical influence

Mongrel

Silver Member
Taking a trip down memory lane I realized that I couldn't think of one time where Ringo's drumming EVER interfered with the smile on my face, the tear on my cheek, or the utter joy in my heart that comes from singing "She loves you yea...yea...yea..." or ANY other Beatles lyric...

Few "bands" have brought that kind of life experience to as many people as the Beatles. Not saying there aren't others...but only a fool would argue the point. To not recognize Ringo's contribution to that phenomenom is intelectually dishonest at best, or intentionally malicious for the sake of attention at worst.

As noted, it's not about liking or not liking it's about truth. And the "truth" just happens to be that an obscure lad from Liverpool, who had bouts of personal illness, and little respect from drumming elites, just happened to have a God-given gift of musicality not dependent on strictly technical ability, that perfectly matched the similar gifting of three other obscure lads from Liverpool....

The rest as they say is history....
 

Someone's Dad

Senior Member
Surely you've all seen this by now:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wJTjjAXDZSY

Those guys are pretty good, aren't they? They seem to think that Ringo is more than just "a hack".
My favourite part of that video is that you have some top, top drummers there and they all play "Come Together" wrong. To be fair, very few drummers get it right, but imagine if your world-famous guitarists couldn't play the intro to Stairway - we'd mock them mercilessly.
 

drummer-russ

Gold Member
wow .. so much anger for me not converting to the ringo fan club. lol buddy rich thought he sucks .. I'll listen to buddy
You are STILL missing the point. You are not being slammed for not "liking" Ringo or becoming part of his fan club, but rather for your inability to see the musical contributions he made including some very original drum parts that help complete the song.
 

Wave Deckel

Gold Member
Music is not about playing an inverted parradiddle at 200bpm, having huge chops and having massive technical abilities, it's about feel, emotions, creativity
Yupp. Many people tend to think that the faster and more technical a drummer is, the better he is. But in the end, a poducer wants you to play the RIGHT thing with FEEL to a song. He is not really interested in how fast you can play, how many great licks and stick tricks you can come up with in ten seconds.

Ringo is definitely not the best drummer from a technical point of view - that credit goes to Joe Morello IMO - but he changed the drumming for the pop/rock genre and he had some very cool ideas that made composers and producers happy. He was/is a damn good musician (although not a great singer. ;) ). He proved furthermore quite often that less is more. He gave songs the space they needed to breathe, to evolve. I was not really impressed by Ringo when I was very young. But studied his drumming and realized that his drumming is actually pretty good. Always understatement but very cool nonetheless.

You don't have to love Ringos drumming. But you should study him from a musical point of view and then you will probably respect what he has accomplished.
 

Thaard

Platinum Member
Check out the great Victor Indrizzo if you want to hear someone continuing Ringo's style and feel.
 
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jornthedrummer

Silver Member
As Larry said try to see if you can improve Ringo's drum parts!
Ringo's have inspired so many to play drums. It does not mean we want to play exactly like him. But we would like to be able to do what he can do in our own bands.

Jorn
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
I used to dislike Ringo, now I really like and respect him for his contributions to music and drumming. Maybe it's sort of a "coming of age" thing.
Ringo for me is like a tomato. I didn't like them when I was a kid. Now, as long as they come from our garden, I love them. Ringo is a stellar accompanist. As a standalone drummer...by himself....let's just say that he isn't a technician. Which is just fine by me. I model my drumming after his accompanist way of approaching a drumset anyway. I'm really not that good by myself. I don't have whatever it takes to be an awesome soloing drummer. Maybe it's a big ego thing, which I kind of detest. My strong points come out when I am accompanying someone. Listening to the others and providing what they need, and filling in the cracks. That's what drumming to me personally is all about. I attribute that to Ringo's and Hal Blaine's influence on me. I admire the great soloing drummers, and would like have that kind of ability, but it's just not a natural thing for me.
I could never have a solo again and be perfectly happy with that. Luckily I only solo a few times a year.

I also like that the word Ringo isn't flagged by spellcheck here on this site.

Was that Bernhard's doing???
 

Thaard

Platinum Member
I used to dislike Ringo, now I really like and respect him for his contributions to music and drumming. Maybe it's sort of a "coming of age" thing.
 

shadowlorde

Senior Member
Ringo had a unique feel and approach which makes it so difficult if not impossible to nail his drum parts.

Unless you can demonstrate you can actually play songs like a day in the life or strawberry fields forever your assessment of Ringo comes off as ignorant.
by unique do you mean slop? or is it all because he starts his fills with his left hand like all lefties playing on righty sets do?
 

shadowlorde

Senior Member
No matter what anyone thinks about old Ring, when I realised that I was fluffing my Bonzo and Ian Paice licks more often than nailing them, Ringo really helped.

He played simply so I could "improve" on his drums parts, which was confidence boosting. I wonder how many thousands of kids have "improved" Ringo's drum parts? :)
now THAT is something I can agree with
 

Anon La Ply

Renegade
No matter what anyone thinks about old Ring, when I realised that I was fluffing my Bonzo and Ian Paice licks more often than nailing them, Ringo really helped.

He played simply so I could "improve" on his drums parts, which was confidence boosting. I wonder how many thousands of kids have "improved" Ringo's drum parts? :)
 

drummer-russ

Gold Member
I'll just add this challenge.

To those that disparage Ringo, please come up with drum parts that are truly original, make them sound easy, be successful at making music the world over knows, and then I will listen. Otherwise my opinion is that you are not as tall as you think standing on the shoulders of musicians like Ringo.
 

Pocket-full-of-gold

Platinum Member
lol buddy rich thought he sucks .. I'll listen to buddy
Actually, what he said was "Ringo was adequate, no more than that". And whilst it's hardly glowing praise, it's not quite the disparaging "sucks/hack" remark that you're trying to twist it into to support your thoughts either.


But while we're cherry picking things Buddy thought, he also stated that you can't really do anything on a drum kit when playing matched grip. He also said that a matched grip roll around the toms was the "apex of creativity" of kids today.

Would you subscribe to that idiocy in your haste to listen to Buddy too?

Ultimately, like him. Don't like him. It's entirely your call and I couldn't give a toss either way. Just don't clutch at straws to try and justify it. It makes for a pretty weak and ill conceived argument when you do.
 
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Hewitt2

Senior Member
wow .. so much anger for me not converting to the ringo fan club. lol buddy rich thought he sucks .. I'll listen to buddy
Ringo had a unique feel and approach which makes it so difficult if not impossible to nail his drum parts.

Unless you can demonstrate you can actually play songs like a day in the life or strawberry fields forever your assessment of Ringo comes off as ignorant.
 

Mad About Drums

Pollyanna's Agent
These threads about Ringo amaze me.

Everyone is entitled to their opinions, granted, but bashing one of the most influential drummer and band in musical history is ridiculous in my eyes, it's not about individual technical abilities, it's about creating some of the best pop/rock songs ever written in the last century, I can get the fact that not everyone like The Beatles, the fact is: Everyone know The Beatles!

Furthermore, there's many, many big household professional named drummers who mention Ringo and/or The Beatles as an influence.

Also, comparing Ringo with other famous drummers and rating his drumming by comparison and/or technical abilities doesn't mean a thing, it's utter BS, each and every drummers are unique, I love all my favourite drummers with equal measure, there's no best, they're all wonderful musicians.

Music is not about playing an inverted parradiddle at 200bpm, having huge chops and having massive technical abilities, it's about feel, emotions, creativity and The Beatles had that in spades, they were also very innovative in their recordings back in the days, might sounds an easy thing nowadays, but back then, they were revolutionary.

my 2c rant.
 

shadowlorde

Senior Member
wow .. so much anger for me not converting to the ringo fan club. lol buddy rich thought he sucks .. I'll listen to buddy
 
"I don't think Ringo's great."

Quick: become one of the world's most respected and influential drummers, then we'll give a ****.

Whether or not you like the Beatles is a matter of personal taste. The fact that Ringo was the right drummer for the Beatles isn't questionable: they fired their original drummer specifically to work with him. He wrote original, musical parts (nothing against Phil Rudd but he never wrote a drum part like 'Something' or 'A Day in the Life') that are instantly recognizable and which perfectly complement the song, and even more technically gifted drummers struggle to replicate his feel, timing, and musicality.

Ringo-bashing is the epitome of lazy trolling. The only person who loses out by not appreciating him ... is you.
 

Tone Laborer

Senior Member
None of the Beatles were virtuoso level on their instruments. Why single Ringo out? The same could be said about the Rolling Stones, Elton John, CSN&Y, The Band, Dylan, lots of successful bands, but they all had a chemistry that resonated with fans. Great band chemistry is more powerful and illusive than great individual playing.
 
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