26 rudiments? 40 rudiments?

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
I remember there used to be 26 rudiments. Now there are 40. This raises many questions for me so I thought I'd tap the collective pool of knowledge that all you good people help to contribute to. Specifically,
Who first "invented" the 26 original rudiments?
When were the last 14 added?
Who "invented" the last 14?
Is there some panel of percussionists that vote on this stuff?
Will there be any more added? Really, the possibilities of different combinations are staggering

If anyone knows any relevant information pertaining to these questions, please enlighten me.
Thanks, this forum rocks.
 

stasz

Platinum Member
I remember there used to be 26 rudiments. Now there are 40. This raises many questions for me so I thought I'd tap the collective pool of knowledge that all you good people help to contribute to. Specifically,
Who first "invented" the 26 original rudiments?
When were the last 14 added?
Who "invented" the last 14?
Is there some panel of percussionists that vote on this stuff?
Will there be any more added? Really, the possibilities of different combinations are staggering

If anyone knows any relevant information pertaining to these questions, please enlighten me.
From wikipedia

'There have been many attempts to formalize a standard list of snare drum rudiments. The National Association of Rudimental Drummers (NARD), an organization established to promote rudimental drumming, put forward a list of 13 "essential" rudiments, and later a second set of thirteen to form the original 26. Finally, the Percussive Arts Society (PAS) reorganized the first 26 and added another 14 to form the current 40 International Drum Rudiments.

The first written rudiment goes back to the year 1610 in Basel, Swizerland[1]. The candle of rudimental drumming is said to be France because in the 17th / 18th century professional drummers became part of the life guard of the kings. It was perfectionized during Napoleon I. The marsh Le Rigodon and his different interpretations in the 18th century is one of the cornerstones that laid the foundation for modern rudimental drumming (among others the "two level"-playing). [2] [3] [encyclopedia Brockhaus]'

Not exactly sure what time period(s) this all happened but I think it's explained in a freytag book i have laying around somewhere...

Thanks, this forum rocks.
This i am sure of. lol yes it's a great place.
 

GruntersDad

Administrator - Mayor
Basel is where Bernhard lives so you know that's right. The rudiments are monitored if that is the right word by the PAS. Percussive Arts Society.
 

SharkyBait911

Senior Member
correct me if im wrong but I there are 26 main rudiments or the basic ones and then 14 other variations and other rudiments that are more unusual..... there is a great list of them on the pas.org website the ones with the star next to them are the main ones ....


tris
 

caddywumpus

Platinum Member
correct me if im wrong but I there are 26 main rudiments or the basic ones and then 14 other variations and other rudiments that are more unusual..... there is a great list of them on the pas.org website the ones with the star next to them are the main ones ....
Okay. You're wrong! :p

The ones with stars next to them were the original rudiments compiled by NARD. Youenjoy00myself posted the correct info (from wikipedia, but whatever...).
 

stasz

Platinum Member
correct me if im wrong but I there are 26 main rudiments or the basic ones and then 14 other variations and other rudiments that are more unusual..... there is a great list of them on the pas.org website the ones with the star next to them are the main ones ....


tris
I wouldn't say they're more unusual, just more rudiments added by PAS. Most importantly don't confuse them with the hybrid rudiments. mmm cheese pataflafla.

40 international PAS rudiements http://www.pas.org/resources/rudiments/rudiments.html

.pdf file of 128 hybrid rudiments (click on link in the first post) http://www.drumlines.org/threads/ubbthreads.php/topics/162763/1.html

Youenjoy00myself posted the correct info (from wikipedia, but whatever...).
Hey, it doesn't have to be reliable to be correct. : )
 
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