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DrumBum213
07-07-2005, 08:18 PM
I've never boughten cymbol polish and i was just wondering what's the best polish to get and if there's and specail technique to use when polishing it. Thanks.

Milo
07-07-2005, 08:36 PM
Each cymbal manufacturer has their own brand of polishes which i would assume works well with their finishes, but who knows. I used Groove Juice which is a cleaner spray and it took off the Sabian logo on most of my cymbals. The more I think about it I realize that I don't like that product at all!! I recommend purchasing the cymbal companies polish.

GPinney
07-07-2005, 08:48 PM
In my opinon, Paste makes the best cymbal polish. It took of all the dirt and made it look like new. Other cymbal polish doesnt work as well and it takes of the cymbal logo. I would deffenetly go for the Paste Cymbal Polish.

medeskisoul
07-07-2005, 08:55 PM
As long as you don't miss logos. Lysol Toilet Bowl Cleaner and Fine Grit Steal Wool. Then wash the cymbal completely with soap and water. Like new. And much cheaper. I actually have used this for years and learned it from my Dad who restores Player Pianoes, Organs, and Juke boxes. thus cleaning brass fittings.

I don't clean at all now. I like dirty cymbals personally.

Pedro
07-07-2005, 09:15 PM
Ok, use the brands cymbal cleaner for you cymbals. But if your cymbals aren't from a brand and are just custom?

somedrummer
07-07-2005, 09:26 PM
I use Zildjian cymbal cleaner on my Zildjians and it takes off the logos, but I got over that. I also dont really mind somewhat dirty cymbals. My brother actually enjoys cleaning cymbals, but i wont do it unless i have to. I've heard of many different ways of cleaning cymbals. I know several people have reccomended Zims cymbal cleaner.

Here are 2 other methods I've heard of: (note: I dont recall weteher on not there were downsides to either of these methods)

1. Brasso (available at a local hardware shop) Apply it with a plastic bag so as not to waste any in a towel. Then let it dry completely before wiping it off with a dry towel.

2. Barkeeper's Friend (aka. BKF) (also from a hardware shop) Sprinkle powder on dry then rub it around the grooves of the cymbal with a damp rag. Then rinse it with HOT water, let it drip for 15 seconds and then dry it immediately.

I havent personally seen these used on cymbals, I just got the ideas from another message board, but I have seen BKF work on other surfaces and it does a great job.

Good luck,

Rob

medeskisoul
07-07-2005, 09:30 PM
Brasso - Not so good. Takes a TON of elbow grease.

Bar keeps Friend - OK, but not so hot and leaves film at times.

Clean Cream - Elbow Grease.

Lysol toilet bowl cleaner- Gets even green corrosion out with some work. It is a mild acid so you MUST wash it off asfter done or it will age your cymbal. So, if you are like me and love dark cymbals let lysol sit on cymbals for a week or so. Corrosion city and darkness to the max. Not recommended if you might change your mind. I will post a picture of a HHX prototype I got from sabian that I did this too. Very nice results.

DrumBum213
07-08-2005, 03:13 AM
Yea well i have mostly Zild. and some paiste. However, i have 3 zild cymbols that are vintage (about 45 years old) and im thinking ill just leave them dirty,

Rudy McRudster
07-08-2005, 03:38 AM
I use a spray cleaner called "Zims" and it actually works quite nicely. Of course, the spray mechanism broke which pisses me off but other than that it wasn't bad.

Colin
07-08-2005, 10:03 AM
I use Bar Keeper's Friend and Steel Wool. It works just fine, although they will take some of the logo off, I rarely clean my cymbals though.

Freddie Freeloader
07-08-2005, 03:28 PM
i just tried this a few weeks ago.... take a lemon, cut it in half, and then squeeze it and rub it around the cymbal.
then take a damp cloth and wipe the cymbal properly.... worked really well, didn't take my logos off.....
make sure to wipe the cymbal properly though....

Anth
07-09-2005, 11:03 AM
i just tried this a few weeks ago.... take a lemon, cut it in half, and then squeeze it and rub it around the cymbal.
then take a damp cloth and wipe the cymbal properly.... worked really well, didn't take my logos off.....
make sure to wipe the cymbal properly though....

Wow! Never tried that one. You da' man! LOL

DrumBum213
07-10-2005, 05:10 AM
Lol pretty clever man.

G-money
07-11-2005, 11:36 PM
Hi, i recently bought a very old ping ride. It has patina all over very thick. I looked closely and appeared to have small rusty dots too. This thing is FILTHY.

I don't mind a little patina, but this is rediculous. What can i do to clean it off? I've taken some of the "green" off with a common brass cleaner, but it's still brown and rusty looking. I haven't tried brasso or the BKF yet. Would those work or even the lemon?

Thanks!

largo61
08-16-2005, 05:48 PM
I desperately need to clean my cymbals. I love the sound of a freshly pollished cymbal. I know a lot of people like the sound of a unclean cymbal, I prefur the clean sound. I have heard that some polish might take off a brilliant finish. Is that true. And if it is what type of cleaner wont take off a brilliant finish. I have found that a Mr. Clean magic eraser works with normal finish but it doesn't work with my Sabian AAX cymbals. Any advice.

Rudy McRudster
08-16-2005, 08:27 PM
Zim's is the most powerful stuff out there and it won't take off brilliant finishes (I don't know if there really is one). It's blown pretty much anything else I've tried clean out of the water, pun intended, and it comes in fairly large bottles comparatively priced to other brands' smaller bottles.
There are a couple disadvantages, though. FIrst off, it's incredibly potent and dangerous, it has a lot of organic detergants in it and it'll do some damage if you don't handle it properly. Second is that it will take off logos, so if you want to keep them on, don't get Zim's. And also, the spray mechanism is really weak so I have a half of a bottle that I have to pour on because it broke and trust me, it doesn't work as well.

All-in-all, it's a great cleaner and it takes off anything without harming the finish. It's hard to go back to others after you use it. I just bought the Sabian cleaner and, after using Zim's, I was very disappointed.

Bashkin
08-21-2005, 06:32 PM
to clean? ,not to clean? Does it effect sound , Any horror storyes , or any happy " I got the gig" Storyes .
can it be done at all and what to use ?
Any cheepo home detergent that can work /or make damage ?

tomtom
08-21-2005, 08:25 PM
to clean? ,not to clean? Does it effect sound , Any horror storyes , or any happy " I got the gig" Storyes .
can it be done at all and what to use ?
Any cheepo home detergent that can work /or make damage ?

The only thing I use to clean my cymbals is mild soap and water. Always when I buy new cymbals I clean all logos off with 100% Acetone (I hate logos), then I use the Paiste cymbal protector. After that; mild soap and water. I guess everyone has his/her own method but I´ve heard good things about the Paiste products. Don´t use detergents you are not sure will not do damage.

ZildjianBoy
09-01-2005, 10:31 AM
Groove Juice if used correctly can actually work. I use it all the time, and I still have the logos on my cymbals. I would suggest doing it in a sink or in a bath tub. Spray the cymbal on one side, let it sit for about a minute, you can't wait too long, b/ this is when it starts to take off the logos. Now instead of wiping the cymbal with a rag and cleaning it that way...turn on the water and rinse off all the cleaner. Flip the cymbal over and spray the other side. wait a minute. rinse. Have a towel laid out already and lay the cymbal on it. With a clean rag DO NOT start wiping the cymbal, instead dab the cymbal over and over on both sides gently. You can do this on the logos, and instead of wiping them away, they stay there since you are dabbing. Once you have gotten all the water away and the cymbal is mostly dry, start to wipe the cymbal gently following the grooves (in circles) I have done this and despite it taking more time than most methods, I've found it to work and keep my logos.

Chilli
09-02-2005, 05:53 PM
Ok! Thanks god I have an old useless Ride! I'm going to take that and soak it in Katchup for a day... See what happens... I hear if you put an old penny in Katchup for a day it will come out like new... Lets see! Now of to the Super Market to buy a galon of Katchup!

'67Rogers
09-04-2005, 04:11 AM
Just did all mine last night. Lysol toilet bowl cleaner first... an effortless tarnish remover that worked better than anything I've tried. ACID WARNING!! Wear hospital type laytex gloves. Works great on Sabians and Zildians and even better on Paistes. Then followed with Bar Keepers Friend to get out the stick marks and leave a protective coat of polish. Bright and shiny, but now my cymbals all smell like the mens room at Sears. Kidding.

finnhiggins
09-04-2005, 04:20 AM
I use Bar Keeper's Friend and Steel Wool. It works just fine, although they will take some of the logo off, I rarely clean my cymbals though.

You use steel wool on cymbals? Geez man, why not just send them to me instead of shredding them :) You'll have to buy new ones soon enough anway...

Chilli
09-06-2005, 07:52 AM
Ok... The katchup wont work. Now something that does work fine (of course im talking about house held items) is a mix of lemon juice and vinager. it works pretty good and you wont loose your logos. Of course I use the ultimate best (in my opinion) Brasso. But of course that takes of your logos. Just how I like it to.

mlehnertz
09-06-2005, 05:21 PM
I haven't polished my cymbals in years. I figure what's the point... I don't think a little tarnish ever hurt the sound and I don't need to be blinded by the flash of a super-shiny cymbal any longer.

HOWEVER - when I did polish my cymbals, I discovered the wonders of muriatic acid. Its got a hell of an odor but man, it'll take *everything* off your cymbal, including that expensive Zildjian logo. Once that was done, any household metal polish will shine it up.

Anduin
10-02-2005, 02:05 AM
Hey all, I just got two new Sabians! Woo hoo!

I picked up a 14 inch HH Sound Control Crash to replace an old 13 that's started cracking, and I got a 16 inch HHX Manhattan Jazz just to expand the collection. (I'd never heard of the "Manhattan" line, and it doesn't even say "crash" on it now that I look a little closer, but it sounds great.)

But the thing is, they're covered in fingerprints from people checking them out at the store. How do I clean them up? Can I use a Windex type thing? Do I have to be worried about chemical reactions between a cleaner and the bronze?

All clues appreciated.

mediocrefunkybeat
10-02-2005, 02:07 AM
Search the forum and you will find plenty of threads on cymbal cleaning. In fact there is a specialist thread dedicated to the 'best cleaner.' Just search.

Btw, congratulations on the Manhattan line; I am exceptionally jealous, I'd be even more jealous if it wasn't for my gorgeous ride...

Sticksman
10-02-2005, 02:14 AM
Congrats man, I love the Hand Hammered Sabians too.

And be glad you got a Manhattan, those cymbals are out of this world. I'm not sure how many places stock them, but of all the drum shops I've been to, only one had them in stock.

Anduin
10-02-2005, 02:27 AM
And be glad you got a Manhattan, those cymbals are out of this world. I'm not sure how many places stock them, but of all the drum shops I've been to, only one had them in stock.

Yeah, this shop only had the one in the size range I was looking for. I checked out maybe 25 crashes and whittled it down to (the HH and) the HHX Manhattan. It's quite a light cymbal, and I don't have high hopes for its extended longevity.

The other sweet thing about this cymbal is that of all the ones I looked at, the Manhattan is the only one where you could very clearly see the wave form moving around the circumference. The laws of wave dynamics in demonstration mode right before me eyes. It looks very cool. All the other cyms, the wave is so complex at the edge that it moves so fast you can't really see any distinct pattern.

Who'd a thought a couple of hunks of bronze could be so much fun?

mediocrefunkybeat
10-02-2005, 02:34 AM
Make sure you don't overhit the Manhattan. That's a very valuable piece of metal that could last you years. Each one has it's own individual character and you don't want to go breaking it! Cymbals are not disposable...

Anduin
10-02-2005, 02:36 AM
take a lemon, cut it in half, and then squeeze it and rub it around the cymbal.

Interesting idea. I've got this biodegradable "citrus degreaser" I use on bike parts. I figure it's mostly lemon juice. Maybe I'll give it a shot.

Anduin
10-03-2005, 05:25 PM
Make sure you don't overhit the Manhattan. That's a very valuable piece of metal that could last you years. Each one has it's own individual character and you don't want to go breaking it! Cymbals are not disposable...

Yeah, I don't think it can take much abuse. It's quite light. I'll try to go easy on it by using it either for just lightish jazz or in a setup with at least two other crashes to spread the punishment around.

The Hand Hammered Sound Control is a weird cymbal. It's got a very short flat section at the edge, as opposed to a continuous curve like most cymbals. Almost like it was about to transmography into a Chinese and then changed its mind at the last second. It's got a very fast decay, which I like, but it's almost a little gong-y, which I'm less sure about.

Anybody else use any of these Sound Control things? What do you think of them?

Kevinm
10-04-2005, 04:57 PM
I use Paiste cymbal cleaner, then followup with a mild dish detergent, then dry. They come out great!. The dish detergent gets off the excess cleaner and dirt that just wiping does not. In addition it also gets rid of the mild acid in the cleaner.

cjl71178
10-04-2005, 06:13 PM
I use whatever cymbal manufacturer's cleaner. I'm using Zildjians now, and still have a couple Paiste's, and I like their cleaner.

I have a question for any Zildjian users. My older set of cymbals still have a couple tiny
"spots" on the cymbal after I cleaned them. I tried rubbing them out, but still have no luck. Anyone have this problem, and possibly solution???

B.C.
01-02-2006, 09:43 PM
What is the best polish to use on Zildjian A custom cymbals without taking off the brilliant finish

somedrummer
01-02-2006, 10:12 PM
I believe Zildjian recently started making a polish that works on all their cymbal lines. I havent yet tried it, but I would expect it to work.

jollymosher
01-09-2006, 02:40 AM
how do you clean cymbals (house hold items)

mlehnertz
01-09-2006, 06:05 PM
Muriatic acid and a metal polish. Talk about a shine. Be careful if you like your pretty Zildjian logos because muriatic acid will take that emblem right off.

But I don't shine my cymbals anymore. I figure what's the point.


MODERATOR EDIT: the following information about muriatic acid should be read carefully before using it for household cleaning. Stick with safe substances that were designed for the task at hand.

Potential Health Effects
----------------------------------

Inhalation:
Corrosive! Inhalation of vapors can cause coughing, choking, inflammation of the nose, throat, and upper respiratory tract, and in severe cases, pulmonary edema, circulatory failure, and death.

Ingestion:
Corrosive! Swallowing hydrochloric acid can cause immediate pain and burns of the mouth, throat, esophagus and gastrointestinal tract. May cause nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea, and in severe cases, death.

Skin Contact:
Corrosive! Can cause redness, pain, and severe skin burns. Concentrated solutions cause deep ulcers and discolor skin.

Eye Contact:
Corrosive! Vapors are irritating and may cause damage to the eyes. Contact may cause severe burns and permanent eye damage.

Chronic Exposure:
Long-term exposure to concentrated vapors may cause erosion of teeth. Long term exposures seldom occur due to the corrosive properties of the acid.

Aggravation of Pre-existing Conditions:
Persons with pre-existing skin disorders or eye problems or impaired respiratory function may be more susceptible to the effects of the substance.

Mr. Polo
01-10-2006, 06:52 PM
I used a combination of lemons and vinegar to clean my cymbals last night and I was totally impressed. Way inexpensive and great results. Mind you, my cymbals weren't really, really dirty... no heavy patina. But, I think it's great. First I cut a lemon in half and squeezed and rubbed the lemon on both sides of the cymbal. I let the juice sit on there for a bit (a minute or so) and then used a cloth soaked in vinegar to wipe it down. After that I cleaned it off thoroughly with soap and water and dried it with a soft rag. Thanks, Freddie Freeloader! I'm not sure how it would work on a really dirty cymbal, but it worked really well on mine.

thumper
01-11-2006, 11:31 PM
I find that Pledge (extra moisturizing formula) works awesome to remove (most) stick marks, and it really brings out a nice shine, because of the lemon oil. Doesn't remove logos either...

Kaden
01-11-2006, 11:40 PM
Flitz.

Period.

It's wierd blue goop in a tube, and it's the best bronze cleaner I've ever encountered. I deal with bronze and brass every day when I'm working in 'artist' mode, and this stuff is the bees knees.

Leaves your logos intact too.

So buy some already.

K

kzdruma
01-12-2006, 06:53 PM
Although I don’t like cymbal polish I have some tips. (Only do this if you want more of a responsive, tingy sound). Use polish that is name brand to the cymbal you are cleaning. Also make sure you apply generously and in small circles. Don’t leave it on there for to long- it will distort that sound and make it sound “uneven”!

Skylane
01-14-2006, 03:50 PM
After polishing them I use a light coat of WD-40. Helps prevent oxidation.

RMS
01-15-2006, 09:54 AM
Use polish that is name brand to the cymbal you are cleaning.

This is partially true.

I'm suprised no one has specifically mentioned that Paiste cymbals have a protective coating on them, and anything other than Paiste cymbal cleaner or mild soap and water will take the coating off. If the coating comes off, which it eventually might, then polish it like any other cymbal.

You can use pretty much whatever you want on other cymbals, but common sense says to use the least abrasive method that gets the job done.

I polished an old 22" Sabian riveted china (an AA, I think?) that had been sitting in a damp basement for years, with powdered metal polish, some old rags and lots of elbow grease. If it weren't for the faded logos and rusted rivets, it looked like a new cymbal.

But the best thing to do is to wipe your fingerprints off them after playing, and every now and then use a very mild polish, like Paiste's, to get the stick marks off and make it shiny.

NUTHA JASON
01-17-2006, 11:07 PM
Hi Nutha Jason. I first would like to thank you for your drum mod and cymbal repair tips. I would like to ask you how yu would go about cleaning cymbals that are dirty. And when I say dirty, I mean old cymbals that are green in some areas. I just want that luster back. I don't care about logos either so anything you could suggest would be very much appreciated. Thank you.

-- Lumberjack Ivan

well with really grotty cymbals i would get some steel wool or carbon water paper and put some elbow grease into them. thick green oxidation means that copper has actually been taken out of the metal so it will be etched (which is why drums must clean their cymbals at the first sign of oxidation) best bet is to rubb this all away and down preferably in the direction of the lathing. then try some of the products found in this thread. but perhaps standard brass polish will be fine for a first go. then wash them down maybe with lemon juice and then warm water, then use a dedicated cymbal cleaner (not paiste cleaner tho as this is quite specific). wipe with a soft cloth.
once again...let us know how they turn out so we can learn from your experiences...give us a before and after pic.


j

LumberjackIvan
01-20-2006, 06:05 PM
As soon as I'm done cleaning them I'll post some pics. Thanks a lot Nutha Jason.

Nick Garland
01-22-2006, 11:59 AM
Just a quick thought, I've never seen anyone mention it or anything but can you clean cymbals with such stuff as OxiClean or any of these products seen in adverts that bring pennies to a sparkling shine or will it damage the cymbal/remove the logo. I was curious as I've got some hats that need a good old clean, I know it doesnt affect the tone but its just abit demoralising knowing they cost so much and look like they are worth 50p.

PdoubleE
01-26-2006, 09:46 PM
Muriatic acid and a metal polish. Talk about a shine. Be careful if you like your pretty Zildjian logos because muriatic acid will take that emblem right off.

But I don't shine my cymbals anymore. I figure what's the point.

Be carful with Muriatic. I know it will melt aluminum as soon as it touches it. Plus it Very corrosive it will eat your skin. ... Actualy This is just an all around BAD Idea. Muriatic acid is Deadly!!!!!!! Really Really is. The use it to clean farms milk tanks and Make Methamphetamine(cladestine)

thumper
01-28-2006, 11:00 PM
I will reiterate...try Pledge Ultra Moisturizing formula (yes- furniture polish!)-I have traded in some cymbals I've been using for 2 years, and I swear that except for the emblem being worn from sticking, they come out looking pristine. I've gotten top dollar for my trade ins (80% of purchase price) because using the stuff. Non caustic, and it really brings out the shine.
Don't ever use abrasive or acidic matierials on your cymbals, especially on brilliant finishes.

radiofriendlyunitshifter
02-07-2006, 07:58 PM
i didn't see anyone mention their use of sabian cymbal cleaner. mine worked very well on

my a customs, brought them back to their store bought shine, and didn't take the zildjian

logo off either. although, if you don't want the logo to come off... don't clean that area as

well! i just used the damp t-shirt that i used to clean the rest of the cymbal to rub over the

logos without spraying anymore cleaner on and it worked beautifully.

Togg
02-08-2006, 05:24 PM
Who cleans there cymbals and how leaves them? if you clean them, do you think it alters the sound? if you do clean them and don't use cymbal cleaner, what do you use?

Stu_Strib
02-08-2006, 05:26 PM
I clean A Customs but don't clean Ks.

Yes it alters the sound. Patina builds up on the bronze alloy (natural, can't be stopped) and changes the cymbals sound over time. This change is generally considered a good thing, and this is one reason why older cymbals are so sought after.

I do clean my A Customs because I want them to sound bright and glassy. Patina kills that. Plus they just look really cool all shiny. I don't clean K's because they sound better as they get older.

I use the Zildjian cleaner stuff that comes in the tube.

Edit: Thanks DogBreath...Seems I'm getting too excited and sloppy as I near my 2000th post!

playplayplay
02-08-2006, 05:29 PM
Ive heard that dirty cymbals make warmer sounds but ive never felt any heat off my Sabians...lol, sounds like a resonable thing to say! I dont clean mine.

Drummer Karl
02-08-2006, 05:56 PM
Hi!

I have got brilliant cymbals and so I clean them but if I have nature looking cymbals I wouldn`t clean them.
Some times I don`t wanna clean my brilliants, too!...it is a personal preference for me, too.

Togg
02-08-2006, 06:02 PM
Interesting, I have recently changed from Paiste to Zil 'K's and I always used to clean my soundedge hihats because they seemed much nicer that way.

Not sure about the 'K's they do look great new and I hate the stick marks on the ride as they build up.

To be honest, I've owned the Paiste set for twenty years and some have been cleaned and some haven't, but I would be hard pressed to say there was a difference in sound between them, I have always heard they changed but was never really too sure.

I mean if you pick up an old cymbal that sounds great on ebay, who's to say it didn't sound that way before?

You see people like Neil Peart who always seems to have bright cymbals (maybe there always new) and then others like Charlie Watts who seems to have the same set un-polished for decade after decade.

But I have yet to notice any difference in my older unpolished cymbals after twenty plus years, of course that might just be Paiste for you.

Leadfoot
02-08-2006, 06:12 PM
Cleaning cymbals is sinful.

Togg
02-09-2006, 02:51 PM
I heard of a guy the other day that cleans his cymbals with sand paper after every gig! seems he claims it hasn't changed the sounds at all.

And on this note I would like to say I consider myself to have a pretty good ear however I do think there is a lot of bull talked when we hear about how they change after time, you'd have to have a pretty good recolection of the original sound to say if they had, and frankly I think you just get used to them and you think the sound has changed.

The first time you try a cymbal it always sounds strange, and it's usually in a shop, you goaway with a pre-concieved notion of what it sounds like, you get home it sounds different, and again different at a gig, so after time you just get used to it, and later on you feel it has changed.

I maybe wrong and I am prefectly able to accept others will challenge this, but that's my view, once they are cleaned they sound just like they did when you bought them.

hateplow
02-09-2006, 03:52 PM
WD-40 works very well on my Paistes. Non-abrasive, very safe on logos and one can will last you years.

Auger
02-09-2006, 04:24 PM
I'm with Stu on this one: to clean or not to clean depends on the individual cymbal.

AAAaanway, I just also wanted to say that you should be careful with whatever you use to polish the cymbal -I always recomend testing on a small, out of sight area on the underside of the bell first. I'm too lazy to clean any of my cymbals, but I used to work in a music store and heard that using the type of polish for sheet bronze cymbals (b-8s or zbts -etc) on cast bronze (AA or A custom or K , etc) can sometimes really do some damage, and vice versa (I know at least sabian and zildjian both make two types of polish intended either for their cast or stamped lines) . -at least that's what I heard (no first hand experience on this -but I wouldn't want to test the theory either!)

famousteo
02-17-2006, 12:11 AM
Just Leave Ur Cymbals Like That :P
unclean.

Whut matters is the soundd they produce

Finaer
02-17-2006, 07:02 PM
HELP!?!
There are too many offers in here. I need a cleaner that takes off all stick marks, but not the logos, at all!!! I have Meinl and Zildjian.

FrazzaB
02-21-2006, 06:19 PM
This may not be true but my mate says that he gets really cheap sugary drinks and leaves his cymbals, one at a time, in over night. The next morning he rinses it with water and dries it and it's like brand new.

cdawg_2010
02-27-2006, 02:46 AM
HELP!?!
There are too many offers in here. I need a cleaner that takes off all stick marks, but not the logos, at all!!! I have Meinl and Zildjian.
I feel the same way but i have sabian cymbals. Can anyone tell me somethen that would work for sabian and not take anything off at all, just stick marks

tdu
02-28-2006, 05:53 PM
A sad question to have to ask, but do you guys think any of these methods will remove electrical tape residue? I had some really old cymbals stored in my house that I am preparing to sell. A friend borrowed one to record and neglected to mention to me he had strips of electrical tape on the underside of it for some reason. I stored it back away again for over 3 years with the tape on it! I honestly don't know much about cymbals and I don't know how aggressive I can get cleaning.

NUTHA JASON
02-28-2006, 06:42 PM
you get special products for removing old glue from your local hardware store. ask them for advice...most of those specialist products only attack the glue and are very gentle on the surface. in my opinion only paistes require a little extra care as they have a special coating...the rest are exposed bronze which won't bedamaged by anything unless it is a strong oxident.

tdu
02-28-2006, 07:08 PM
On finished items like my guitars I use lighter fluid to remove sticker goo. From what you are saying I guess that might work too? I find the lighter fluid works better than goo-gone or any of those products. Again, I just don't know a ton about cymbals. I would assume they are pretty resilient though.

I have 2 I need to clean. They are both from the 70's. One is a Zildjian flat ride, and one is a Sabian medium ride with rivets.

Mr. Polo
03-04-2006, 11:31 AM
A sad question to have to ask, but do you guys think any of these methods will remove electrical tape residue? I had some really old cymbals stored in my house that I am preparing to sell. A friend borrowed one to record and neglected to mention to me he had strips of electrical tape on the underside of it for some reason. I stored it back away again for over 3 years with the tape on it! I honestly don't know much about cymbals and I don't know how aggressive I can get cleaning.

I haven't tried it on cymbals, but maybe Goo Gone. It surely can be found at any hardware store. It claims to remove grease, stickers, tar, gum, crayon, tape, etc. I've got a cymbal with this kind of residue as well, which has been there for years. I'm going to try it out; I'll let you know how it goes. (Wonder if it would work well for stick marks?)

drumfury
03-15-2006, 12:18 PM
just use the cleaner that comes with that brand thats what i do cus you never know what other stuff could do to them.

KLittle123
03-23-2006, 01:22 AM
Ok, I got white streaks all over my cymbals from Travis Barker signature sticks (they're the crappiest sticks i've ever used) and I was wandering if anyone knew how to get them off. I got em all over my cymbals.

TopCat
03-23-2006, 01:25 AM
cymbal cleaner + elbow grease i guess

and dont ever use those sticks.

cdawg_2010
03-23-2006, 01:26 AM
i would try cymbal cleaner. i have those and i hate that so i dont use them

finnhiggins
03-23-2006, 01:36 AM
Yeah, cymbal cleaner will do it. Coloured sticks are idiotic.

KLittle123
03-23-2006, 01:43 AM
I'm thinking off like house hold things, I dont' really want to go out and buy cymbal cleaner, and yes I found out never to use those sticks, they're the crappiest I think i've ever used. I also found out that toothpaste works well for anyone who wants to know.

cdawg_2010
03-23-2006, 01:50 AM
check out the cleanin cymbal thread its a sticky it talks all about takin stuff off

insane drummer
03-23-2006, 01:54 AM
Real men don't use cymbal cleaner.

jollymosher
03-23-2006, 01:54 AM
they are the evil anti-sabain haha. yeah, i took some light sand paper to get the crappy white stuff off. they are a good stick, but vicfirth makes a non white one that is simular.

jollymosher
03-23-2006, 01:56 AM
as for the cymbal cleaner... toilet bowl cleaner and steel wool.

jordanz
03-23-2006, 11:43 PM
I have never cleaned my cymbals. Like an old cast-iron skillet, cymbals get better with age and use.

Bonzo91
03-24-2006, 12:17 AM
Paiste cymbal cleaner.

figure_02
04-03-2006, 10:25 AM
has any1 tried the Meinl cymbal cleaner? Will the logo go off on my Amuns?

(I usually just dust them)

RMS
04-09-2006, 03:18 AM
I wouldn't worry about the logos. It doesn't affect the value of your cymbal if the logo is faded or missing, unless you're trying to pass it off as brand new. Or maybe some people care what other people think and want them clearly displayed...To tell you the truth I sometimes find logos distracting, you know? Ever find yourself reading your logos when you're playing? Or watching them slowly rotate when you play? I'm not going to go out of my way to remove them, but I'm not going to miss them when they fade. Actually I might scrub the logo off my Paiste that I had cut down to a smaller size, because now the logo is right on the edge and it looks weird. Obviously the protective coating that Paiste uses has been compromised anyways from sanding the edges.

Paiste 2002
04-09-2006, 12:33 PM
Wow guys, some of the methods that I read in the first two pages (brillo pads etc.) will absolutely ruin any cymbal that is coated. That coating is not a protective layer only, but on most models it is what seals in the sound of the cymbal, and if it is partly or completely removed you have a cymbal that rings out of control and doesn't sound like the original at all. Paiste's, and almost all of the Zildjians and Sabians that have glossy coating on them, like i said, will be pretty much ruined if it is removed. The coating (in most cases) is computer controlled for each cymbal and seals in the character of the given model. Like others have said, the mild Paiste and Zildjian cleaners are all you should use. The key is to lightly clean them every two months or so, so they don't get heavily tarnished and you have to take a brillo pad to them lol. The people that make the cymbals know very well what is needed to clean them, so do yourself a favor and take their advice, and products.

Togg
04-20-2006, 04:06 PM
OK get ready to shout Noooooooooooooooooo!

I have tried this and it works very well...
For a long time I have been wondering how to clean cymbals to factory standards without damage or giving myself a permanent elbow injury.

I finally hit on the idea of using a power drill.... waits for the screams, but attached to it a lambs wool buffer used to buff cars etc.

Anyway I tried it on a old cymbal first, very little pressure and changed the pad tree times from application to final buff, the cymbal never gets hot or warm and comes up a treat.

Anyone else tried this, beware use professional equipment and do it gently!!!!!

I then went on to try it on my 'K's and ...... well I now have great looking cymbals and minimal arm ache!

I don't advise doing this often but maybe once a year just to keep them looking good.

So what do you think?

Cymbalrider
05-05-2006, 03:51 AM
I got some of the new Zildjian cleaner polish stuff and it works very well on my Avedis cymbals. They have a nice shine to them and no stick marks. They are still new so there wasn't much there to clean but they have a much nicer sound than they did originally. I just didn't put the stuff over the logos though, but if you didn't mind them missing then go ahead. This stuff would clean them off I suppose.

I'm eager to try it on some really dirty cymbals though. I wasn't sure this would work but it does. It even cleans the white marks from "travis barker" sticks (not sure why I had those but there they were anyway.) The cymbals actually look like they almost have the "Brilliant" finish even though they don't.

The stuff makes a mess of your towels though.

davidst
05-06-2006, 08:37 PM
I don't clean at all now. I like dirty cymbals personally.

I agree. I used groove juice and had the same problem with logo removal. Also the cymbals were so dirty it didn't even clean them well. It took repeated applications and they still weren't perfect. And to top it off I decided I kinda liked the tarnished look better anyway.

I had an idea but I haven't tried it yet (and probably won't). If you could get some kind of plastic tub that is big enough for the cymbal, you might be able to fill the tub groove juice diluted with water. Then drop the cymbal in, let it sit a bit, pull it out and spray it with a hose (do this all outside) and repeat until it looks good. Since you're not wiping the polish off, this may preserve the logos. Or it may not work at all. Like I said, I haven't tried it. :)

_Ryan_
05-08-2006, 11:14 PM
Hey, Does anyone have any good ideas on what I could use to get magic marker writing off my cymbals. My little cousin got ahold of my crash cymbals and wrote all over them. There cheap cymbals so I don't mind if it takes any of the finish off. I just want this writing off of it.

AvengedDrummer
05-08-2006, 11:25 PM
Hmmm I like the logos on my cymbals.... I also like them nice and SHINY. But whoever said dont clean K's they are definately right. Those get better with age. Oh, I use Zildjian cymbal cleaner too, just because I won it at a clinic.

thumper
05-11-2006, 12:21 AM
For Christ's sake-DON'T use anything abrasive on your cymbals-would you polish your car with steel wool and toilet bowl cleaner??
I've said it twice, and I still stand by Pledge (extra moisturizing) furniture polish. It's loaded with lemon oil; great for removing fingerprints on your furniture, (and your cymbals), and because your cymbals are metal alloy, they soak it up and shine like a gold tooth in a pimp's mouth. I have 14" AA sizzle hats (natural finish), and I use Pledge on them once a month-no visible stick marks, and on brilliant finish cymbals, the results are awesome.
Pledge is about $4 a can-give it a try before you wreck your cymbals with something caustic...

GRUNTERSDAD
05-12-2006, 05:35 AM
From Muscians Friend Tech Tip of The Week 5/11/06
How to Clean Your Cymbals

To clean or not to clean, this is the question for many drummers when it comes to their cymbals. Some players believe that a certain amount of grime and grit and smoky residue adds to the character of the cymbal. No doubt a certain barroom neglect may give your cymbals a certain roadhouse ambience. But for those who are interested in extending the life of their cymbals and keeping them shining like disks of pure sonic gold under the stage lights, here are some helpful tips.

Many new cymbals are sprayed with a protective coating to keep them from tarnishing in the store, so your cymbals may need less cleaning during the first six months, depending on use. During this time, a solution of warm water and liquid dishwasher soap will clean fingerprints, dirt, and grime. As your cymbals age, we recommend using a professional cleaning cream to remove stick marks and tarnish. Put a small amount onto the surface with a soft cloth and rub in the direction of the tonal grooves, until the metal appears through the film. After the polish has dried to a haze, buff gently with a clean, soft cloth. Clean only a small section of the cymbal at a time. Always avoid using steel wool, wire brushes, scouring pads, or metal cleaners that are abrasive. These products will scratch the surface of your cymbal.

bobie2000
05-14-2006, 02:12 PM
my cymbals are all second hand and the logos are half faded away, is there anyway to get rid of the stick marks and the logos without damaging the cymbol?

adamjames
05-17-2006, 09:48 PM
yeah, nail polish remover.

Johan VDS
05-17-2006, 10:48 PM
Or thinner. Or acetone.

Bigfoot
05-19-2006, 07:10 AM
Ok, I got white streaks all over my cymbals from Travis Barker signature sticks (they're the crappiest sticks i've ever used) and I was wandering if anyone knew how to get them off. I got em all over my cymbals.

I had the Exact same thing the White stain dosen't seem to be coming off!
Last time i'll ever use it on one of my cymbals!

Just out of interest does cleaning the Cymbal actually affect the sound at all?

tyler
06-02-2006, 10:02 PM
any help is greatly appreciated.

Mediocrefunkybeat
06-02-2006, 10:18 PM
At this juncture, I will help you by suggesting that you:

i) Check the stickies.
ii) Check the correct forum.
iii) Use the 'Search' button.

jamsjr44
06-02-2006, 10:20 PM
go to the drum store and by cymbal cleaner/polish.... if not use mild soap and water if you have a high gloss shine on them be very careful with the amount of soap it can strip the finish. I would then buff my cymbals with a cloth buff rag...

~tamadrummer~
06-02-2006, 10:37 PM
http://drummerworld.com/forums/search.php?searchid=427558

Gongman
06-15-2006, 06:40 AM
Water + dish soap + more water = clean cymbals for new cymbals.

If you have older, tarnished cymbals, why not leave the patina on and let them age gracefully...

jammetta
06-23-2006, 09:27 AM
Or thinner. Or acetone.
are you serious? I would have thought they rather destyroy cymbals

neilpscuz
07-02-2006, 07:31 PM
I have found over 25 yrs that Brasso,(originally suggested by my drum teacher),and the Paiste cym cleaner to be about the best.Your cyms are a musical inst, not a dirty pot or bathroom.TREAT them as such! If you are not prepared to use a little elbow grease to get them clean,go buy new ones!There are no cheat codes for this!

apollos84
07-05-2006, 05:03 PM
I've never boughten cymbol polish and i was just wondering what's the best polish to get and if there's and specail technique to use when polishing it. Thanks.

What is use is a homemade brew it works wonders and is biodegradable. Salt and white Vinegar. take the cymbal and wet it with water in a sink take a paper towel pour a little vinegar on the cymbal and a ton of salt rub it real good with the wet paper towel and after clean up using soap and water.

Drum-Head
07-05-2006, 05:11 PM
I just cleaned my Sabian cymbals the other night using the Paiste cleaner. It's works perfectly, you just have to avoid the logos so you don't erase them...

timebandit
07-27-2006, 06:39 AM
Each cymbal manufacturer has their own brand of polishes which i would assume works well with their finishes, but who knows. I used Groove Juice which is a cleaner spray and it took off the Sabian logo on most of my cymbals. The more I think about it I realize that I don't like that product at all!! I recommend purchasing the cymbal companies polish.
dude....groove juice is THEE best' just spray on and rinse off. can't beet it! as far as logo's go...... just avoid them.I mean, if you rub hard enough, they will probably come off with just water.

Timbali
08-11-2006, 06:46 AM
I've used a VERY acidic commercial bathroom cleaner called "ZAP". Wal Mart used to carry it, but no more. It's the kind of stuff that takes off logos, any protective coating, dirt, grime, grease and probably the top layer off your driveway (you can't use the stuff inside without a note from a respiratory therapist!)

After I tried it the first time, it turned my old Zildjian Amir ride PURPLE. I kid you not, the cymbal turned purple.

It was fine though after I hit it with some Wrights silver polish.

That cymbal looked just like it did when I bought it in 1988--except for not having the logo anymore.

Now I just have to find someone to resurface my driveway ;)

kile678
08-12-2006, 03:00 AM
i dont clean my cymbals most of the time but i f i feel the need i use water and windex half and half a zildjian rep actually gave the idea so dont worry about messin up your stuff

n8nod9it
08-12-2006, 05:36 AM
Flitz works great. Also that wheel polishing cotton in a chrome can at the autostore works. Or Turtle wax Chrome polish...I've use all of these to shine my cymbals. I also recommend putting a bit of Blue Painters tape over the logos before you use any polish if you want to keep them there.

n8nod9it
08-12-2006, 05:37 AM
I've used a VERY acidic commercial bathroom cleaner called "ZAP". Wal Mart used to carry it, but no more. It's the kind of stuff that takes off logos, any protective coating, dirt, grime, grease and probably the top layer off your driveway (you can't use the stuff inside without a note from a respiratory therapist!)

After I tried it the first time, it turned my old Zildjian Amir ride PURPLE. I kid you not, the cymbal turned purple.

It was fine though after I hit it with some Wrights silver polish.

That cymbal looked just like it did when I bought it in 1988--except for not having the logo anymore.

Now I just have to find someone to resurface my driveway ;)

THats the phosphoric acid turning it colors...

R3flex
08-19-2006, 08:26 PM
I use the Paiste cymbal cleaner on my Zildjian A Customs, and, as long as the directions are followed, it works beautifully. It takes off fingerprints, stick marks, and dust/dirt. The shine I got from it is brilliant, my cymbals are practically glowing. As has been previously stated, just try to avoid the logos as they will be washed away (it also makes the cleaning process slower as you will have to wash off the smeared logo.) While I havn't tried many other methods besides this and light soap/water, I highly reccommend the Paiste cymbal cleaner.

jemhadar
08-20-2006, 03:30 PM
I use Autosol Chrome Glans and elbow grease :)

cruehead08865
08-25-2006, 08:09 AM
I use windex on my symbols!!!!!

AllTheCoolNamesAreTaken
09-01-2006, 12:30 AM
I think there's confusion between cleaning and polishing cymbals. Some people are responding with "don't clean them, leave them dirty", but that's horrible advice if there is corrosion building on the cymbal.

I just bought some cymbals from eBay and they arrived extremely dirty, some with green corrosion on them. I cleaned the hell out of them with Paiste cymbal polish (made five rags and a towel solid black with gunk) and while they're not 100% clean (seems I was just pushing some of the dirt around) they look incredible now, almost brand new, and they are better protected against further corrosion.

Although I would definitely like to find a better solution than Paiste polish and elbow grease - particularly something that could get into the fine grooves - that's my recommendation to anyone in the same situation. Paiste polish, and some patience and hard work.

BTW, if that special coating wears off after 6 months, how can it significantly affect the sound as claimed? I thought the greasy layer that's on every new cymbal was just for shop protection, like the formalin they put in new clothes.

Do people in general recommend putting a light coat of WD-40 or something similar on the cymbal after a good cleaning?

defunkt
09-04-2006, 10:49 AM
I just used Paiste Cymbal cleaner for the first time today and it's great I highly recommend although it is a bit pricy, but definately worth once they look brand new again (apart from the logo, but I don't mind that).

Drumjunk723
09-10-2006, 04:01 PM
I found that most cymbal cleaners do take of dirt and grime and most other types of cleaners do the same, but the price is losing either a logo or it just gets dirtier faster. I choose not to clean too much and my advice to anyone is to not over-clean your cymbals

defunkt
09-11-2006, 10:19 AM
I don't see the problem about having a logo or not?
The only thing you should be concerned with is the sound they produce
I think cleaning is important though because if they do get too dirty it can slightly affect the sound and they don't look anywhere near as good as they do clean.

AllTheCoolNamesAreTaken
09-12-2006, 04:13 AM
It's just a matter of preference. I think the logo on the cymbal adds character - otherwise it's just a circle of shiny metal. But that's the only reason I try to protect them.

pearldjian0711
09-12-2006, 04:30 AM
Although I would definitely like to find a better solution than Paiste polish and elbow grease - particularly something that could get into the fine grooves - that's my recommendation to anyone in the same situation. Paiste polish, and some patience and hard work.there's this stuff called rgs labs FW1, its a spray that washes your car with out water. i havent washed my car in 5 months. after using it on my car, i wondered if it would work on my cymbals because it cleaned up all the gunk and dirt off my rims really well. so i tried it on my cymbals and it worked just as good. i have tried every cleaner on my cymbal and havent been successful on removing the fingerprints. i thought they would be permanent. but when i used this, it came right off and left my cymbals brilliant and looking brand new again. the best part is that you dont use any elbow grease and it doesnt remove the logo!

defunkt
09-12-2006, 10:56 AM
Wow that sounds great. But I don't see how it removes all the dirt but not the logo?

AllTheCoolNamesAreTaken
09-12-2006, 08:58 PM
Just pray you don't buy cymbals like I did. I just did round two of polishing on my Paiste Dimensions Power Ride with one round of Brasso and five more rounds of Paiste polish, and I think the thing is almost clean. That was the dirtiest damn cymbal I've ever seen in my life.

I made a couple of stupid mistakes while cleaning so here's a few pointers for first-timers:

- They guy who said to use a plastic bag to apply the cleaner/polish is a genius. Took about 1/3rd the liquid to do the whole cymbal. Just put a little dab on the cymbal directly and work it back and forth with your finger in a plastic bag.
- If you're using Paiste cleaner/polish, do the whole cymbal that way leaving the thick coat of residue and grime on the cymbal. Then just put the thing under a shower head and see the gunk run right off your cymbal. If your cymbal was as dirty as mine, repeat until you pass out.
- For stubborn stains and corrosion, first try Brasso (I've heard it will remove logos but I accidentally got some on mine and they stayed). Just follow the directions - apply with a plastic bag, let dry, wash off with soap and water, then buff to a shine.
- If the stain/corrosion is really stubborn, you have to make a decision: live with it, or break out the Barkeeper's Friend. You should really be sure you want to do this, because as I found out, removing the problem with BF will lighten the area you're cleaning (it removes everything) and you'll either be stuck with a lighter part, or have to do the whole cymbal. I had some green corrosion spots I used it to remove, but luckily my problem was on the underside of the cymbal so I just have a few bright spots there now.
- After doing any of those more extreme solutions, I suggest re-doing a layer of Paiste cleaner/polish to even out the shine.

And you should have a very nice looking cymbal. Although it's funny, once you start cleaning and looking for dirt/uneven polishing they'll never look perfect to you again.

defunkt
09-13-2006, 10:41 AM
It would be cool to see some before and after pictures of cymbals
I'm always amazed by how different my cymbals look after a good clean

Warlock
09-16-2006, 03:08 AM
As long as you don't miss logos. Lysol Toilet Bowl Cleaner and Fine Grit Steal Wool. Then wash the cymbal completely with soap and water. Like new. And much cheaper. I actually have used this for years and learned it from my Dad who restores Player Pianoes, Organs, and Juke boxes. thus cleaning brass fittings.

I don't clean at all now. I like dirty cymbals personally.

Thanks for the advice. I tried so many things and nothing worked so good as the lysol toilet bowl cleaner. That stuff is amazing. Thanks again.

bonzolead
09-20-2006, 08:16 PM
I've always used "Bars Keepers Friend" wet the cymbal,sprinkle some on the cymbal and make a paste out of it,let it stand for about 10 Minutes lightly scrub it off and rince very well and your cymbals will look as good as new.be careful scrubbing it around the letters as they may come off and make sure you rince them very well.i like this stuff because it's. non-abrasive and it dosen't. leave a film like "Brasso",or the various cymbal polishes.

Good Jammin'

Bonzolead

cheeseadiddle
09-21-2006, 08:36 AM
When I get the cymbal brand new (or used) I use a product called Jasco Premium Paint & Epoxy Remover to get the logos off. Some of the Turkish companies use a paint like substance for their logos that acetone, lacquer thinner and the like won't remove. Once my cymbals are naked, all I use on them thereafter is a featherduster.

cheeseadiddle
09-21-2006, 08:39 AM
I use windex on my symbols!!!!!

Does it work on cymbals too?

bonzolead
09-21-2006, 04:44 PM
When I get the cymbal brand new (or used) I use a product called Jasco Premium Paint & Epoxy Remover to get the logos off. Some of the Turkish companies use a paint like substance for their logos that acetone, lacquer thinner and the like won't remove. Once my cymbals are naked, all I use on them thereafter is a featherduster.any kind of petrolium product leaves a film on the cymbal and makes them sound dull,no thanks

fanagel
09-22-2006, 10:24 PM
I use automotive "very fine cut" rubbing compound(if i see any scratches in the cymbal), with an electric buffer, in the direction of the tonal grooves, followed by a automotive polish, followed by a caranuba wax to seal the surface from further oxidation for a couple of months. This processs has been proven for decades on auto surfaces, without removing or destroying the "protective" layer of the vehicle.
Yes, I use this process on my K's but not as often so i get the dark sound that I like from K's. I am able to control the darkness without the cymbal getting to the point of grossness...(green/black splotchespatchesspots).
And yes I use this on my brilliants without problems.
I use Maguires products exclusivley and I use microfiber towels (lots and lots of towels)

Deathmetalconga
09-26-2006, 12:48 AM
For Christ's sake-DON'T use anything abrasive on your cymbals-would you polish your car with steel wool and toilet bowl cleaner??
I've said it twice, and I still stand by Pledge (extra moisturizing) furniture polish. It's loaded with lemon oil; great for removing fingerprints on your furniture, (and your cymbals), and because your cymbals are metal alloy, they soak it up and shine like a gold tooth in a pimp's mouth. I have 14" AA sizzle hats (natural finish), and I use Pledge on them once a month-no visible stick marks, and on brilliant finish cymbals, the results are awesome.
Pledge is about $4 a can-give it a try before you wreck your cymbals with something caustic...


I've never thought of using Pledge. But won't that leave a wax residue? That's what it's supposed to do for wood, clean and wax.

I use this stuff called Mr. Metal. Rub it on, let it dry and rub it off. It requires virtually no hard scrubbing, so it's fast and easy on the finish and silkscreen printing.

I am persnickety about keeping my cymbals very shiny so I keep a small bottle of Mr. Metal and soft rags in my cymbal safe for use at a gig. I also wear soft cotton gloves during set up and take down. The only time I actually touch them is when I choke them.

fanagel
09-26-2006, 05:39 PM
I've never thought of using Pledge. But won't that leave a wax residue? That's what it's supposed to do for wood, clean and wax.

I use this stuff called Mr. Metal. Rub it on, let it dry and rub it off. It requires virtually no hard scrubbing, so it's fast and easy on the finish and silkscreen printing.

I am persnickety about keeping my cymbals very shiny so I keep a small bottle of Mr. Metal and soft rags in my cymbal safe for use at a gig. I also wear soft cotton gloves during set up and take down. The only time I actually touch them is when I choke them.



I tried the pledge myself. (extra moisturizing) It was okay at first but then I noticed a buildup of wax over a couple of months that would smear around the cymbal. And no, I wasn't using it every day or every week. I would just wipe down after parctice or a gig with the same microfiber rag.

FunkTional Art
09-27-2006, 12:41 PM
I've tried all kinds of cymbal cleaning products from Sabian to Zildjian .... One product that works farily well is what is known as a wadding cloth soaked in something that smells a bit like kerosene and comes in a air tight can.
Ginger Baker ...CREAM... is known to use lighter fluid .. a kind of kerosene type substance.
A few different companies market this product, the only difference being that their name is on the can. I found this product on the shelf at my local hardware store for about $5.00 a can ... a couple of years later a local music store called Tom lee music was selling it as their own special cymbal polish for around $8 - $10 a can ... that's funny , go figure.

BUT WAIT HERES MY SECRET
The Best thing I've found to work on polished,natural and my Paiste cymbals is drum roll RRLLRRLLRRLLRRLLRRLLRRLLRRLLRRLLRRLRRLRRLLRRLL
TOOTHPASTE
I tried some one night it was Crest Vanilla and I was freaked at how great it worked. So I gave it some thought and figured it must be the whitening effect of the toothpaste, namely the BAKING SODA. So I went to the drugstore and bought the strongest off the shelf whitening toothpaste which was
ARM AND HAMMER EXTRA WHITENING TOOTHPASTE. It works like a charm. Consider this is what takes the stains off your teeth and it's totally safe to come into contact with, no harsh fumes, no gloves to wear. Just squeeze some right onto the cymbal surface and use a water soaked sponge (good place to do this is in the bathtub or a sink where you have running water) and worked the toothpaste around and into the cymbal grooves ... the baking soda gets right in there and use a bit of elbow grease but more important is to just work it around for a few minutes. Rinse off and towel dry and buff lightly.
The result is a very clean and polished cymbal with a nice minty smell that will have fewer cavities. HAHA

This took all of the stick marks off of my K custom HI Hat and was gentle on my Paiste Signature crashes and didn't dull my brilliant Sabian HH ride. Also this method is very cost effective and enviroment friendly.

"THIS POST IS JUST A CYMBAL OF MY AFFECTION FOR ALL OF MY DRUMMING FAMILY"

Jay.B.
09-27-2006, 01:00 PM
I work at a small chemical production plant, when I say small I mean there's only 8 of us work there including the boss, I rarely clean my cymbals, possibly once 12 to 18 months, and when I do... *takes deep breath and prepares to be shot* ...I use what is basically a mild phosphoric acid and hydrochloric acid solution, I'm not talking about letting them soak in it, just squirt all over, a quick wipe then rinse off thoroughly with fresh water (can't you tell I wrote out most of the directions for all our products haha) Think Barry Scott on the Cillit Bang advert doing the "Penny Test" It brings them up a treat.

Last time I cleaned them, it took me all of 10 minutes to do the lot, dried and back in the box again.

Zildjian 242
10-05-2006, 05:24 PM
I clean them with dawn soap (its blue) wors good, gets the dirt from under them. Then I use Paiste cymbal protector, its works. but every other time I clean them I but some turtle wax on them. They make my A customs look like a mirror.

I really wouldent try any other way because A it works, and B im scared of alot of cleanors.

hauk
10-08-2006, 07:02 AM
i just tried dawn dishsoap and water, didnt take the fingerprints off.... i dont need my cymbals incredibly shiny, its just i just got the ride not to long ago and it seems alot of people have been ogling it in the shop haha - lots of fingerprints

JAHdrumming
12-08-2006, 07:11 PM
I use mostly Z cust A's so everything cleans off of them pretty nicely with toothpaste and it makes them so shiny! For the rest of the cymbals (a bunch of assorted Zilds) I just rub them off with a mild mixture of water and detergent after studio and gigs. Anything that is not coated to look shiny like a Zild cust A should get an aged look to it naturally. Remember there is a difference between a dirty cymbal and a corroded cymbal...clean does not have to mean shiny!

darth_vater89
12-20-2006, 02:02 AM
Okay guys, time to clear a few things up (note: these are the processes that i used to clean my cymbals, please dont scrutanise just because you use different techniques to me :) )

1 - Use tooth paste, any whitening toothpaste, put on cymbal and work into groooves with your fingers.


2 - KEEP AWAY FROM THE LOGO'S IF YOU DONT WANT THEM FADED, any cymbal cleanser will fade logo's in time so stay away, even if it is the manafacturers cleanser.


3 - wash off under warm water with a nail brush working around the cymbal following the lathe marks.


4 - DRY IMMIDEATELY, as there still may be some toothpaste residue left on the cymbal


5 - using 2 seperate cloths, spray on some ordinary household surface cleanser, (I used MR SHEEN, but I live in Australia so i dont know if you american boys have it over there. Mr sheen has a dust prevention system and leaves a nice shiny surface on my cymbals).

6 - Buff this off with a dry clean cloth.



These processes were done with "B8PRO SABIANS" these cymbals have a high lustre brilliant finish on them, so cleaning is vital to me.


COST: Toothpaste x2 - $4
Mr Sheen x1 - $3

Total cost................................ $7-10 !!!!

half that of any of the big 3's cleaners and twice as much volume.

darth_vater89
12-20-2006, 02:07 AM
On another note:

- If you have stick marks on your cymbals, note just any, but dreaded tip marks that have been scrathed into the cymbals lathe marks, you have 1 of 2 options:

1 - Leave the marks there and live with it

2 - be willing to use some fine grain steel wool and an abrasive such as BAR KEEPERS FRIEND to scrath the mark out.


PLEASE DO NOT USE ABRASIVES ON YOUR CYMBALS. CYMBALS ARE NOT MEANT TO BE SCRATCHED BY ABRASIVES, IT CHANGES THE SOUND OVER TIME IF YOU KEEP DOING IT.



may the forks be with you.

Zildjian 242
12-21-2006, 03:19 AM
http://i63.photobucket.com/albums/h160/Zildjian_242/DSCF3251.jpg

Got this baby home full of fingerprints and stick marks. Cleaned with LEMONS

Try this, you will be shocked. Does not work with paistes because of the coating they put on them

parksung
01-04-2007, 03:32 AM
i've got a Sharpie signature and stamped initials on my Zildjian cymbal.

i'm going to try Lysol toiletbowl cleaner and/or Arm & Hammer Extra Whitening Toothpaste.

the stamps might be a tough one to get out, not sure if the 2 options above will do the trick....any other suggestions?

Boadrummer
01-13-2007, 05:19 AM
I'm kinda in the same situation as parksung, my old guitarist drew on my Sabian AAX crash with a red ballpoint pen... any ideas as to how I'd get this off?

hawkins01902
01-17-2007, 05:48 PM
Brasso removes logos
i tried it on one of my cheaper paiste 101 cymbals n took the logo straight off.
Plain soap and water removes stick marks but its a mission lol

fanagel
01-20-2007, 06:26 AM
Okay I couldn't stand it any longer.....You say not to use abrasives....what do you think that steel wool and Bar keepers friend is.........any Polish is an abrasive.

On another note:

- If you have stick marks on your cymbals, note just any, but dreaded tip marks that have been scrathed into the cymbals lathe marks, you have 1 of 2 options:

1 - Leave the marks there and live with it

2 - be willing to use some fine grain steel wool and an abrasive such as BAR KEEPERS FRIEND to scrath the mark out.


PLEASE DO NOT USE ABRASIVES ON YOUR CYMBALS. CYMBALS ARE NOT MEANT TO BE SCRATCHED BY ABRASIVES, IT CHANGES THE SOUND OVER TIME IF YOU KEEP DOING IT.



may the forks be with you.

parksung
01-27-2007, 10:18 AM
i've got a Sharpie signature and stamped initials on my Zildjian cymbal.

i'm going to try Lysol toiletbowl cleaner and/or Arm & Hammer Extra Whitening Toothpaste.

the stamps might be a tough one to get out, not sure if the 2 options above will do the trick....any other suggestions?

nail polish removed took off the stamped initials...didn't work on the Sharpie though...will try rubbing alcohol for that one...

7red7
02-02-2007, 03:22 PM
I also use the Sabian spray cleaner on my cymbals and it brings them to a factory brilliance everytime without removing any of the logo...

Sabian spray cleaner + old plain white t-shirt = a happy cymbal...

Fingerprints, oil spots, rust/tarnish spots, heavy tarnish, I've seen it remove it all, and the best part is that you don't have to rub hard at all...No buffing required, spray on, wipe off and you're good to go!!! I love the bright sounds from my polished crashes :)

cantstandyourfunk
02-02-2007, 04:29 PM
Okay guys: I just bought a fortune worth of K Customs and A Customs. I work a day-job, and am just an ordinary guy: so I would probably never be able to buy these kind of top-notch cymbals again in this life o’mine (I bought 13” New Beat hats, a 18” K Custom Dark Crash, a 16” A Custom Projection Crash, and a 22” K Custom Medium Ride). The thing is, these cymbals are all in brilliant finish, and since they were from a little old stock (a year old), there seems to be a large amount of stains on ‘em, especially on the Projection Crash and the Ride. Now, while I’m aware of this huge debate on cleaning vs not cleaning cymbals, and though the cymbals have great tone, I was just wondering whether it is advisable to clean these babies. And if yes, then what's the best way? I am from Calcutta, India, and the only thing that's available here is a Zildjian polish. Should I use it, if it is to be used at all?

50thMasters
03-03-2007, 12:36 AM
NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOo, no caustics, no abrasives

I only have one thing to say, SABIAN spray cleaner

I struggled for years with everything under the sun to get and keep my cymbals clean, I have tried many many products, and I have to say, I have never used any that works so well, and simply. IT works

cantstandyourfunk
03-04-2007, 11:34 AM
Well, I understand your enthusiasm: and thanx a tonne for your feedback. But does the Sabian polish work as well on cymbals of ANY make: including Zildjians?

stillgroovin
03-08-2007, 12:44 AM
I just bought and used the Paiste cleaner and I have to say it was GREAT!. My Paistes shine like diamonds again!!!

Crashmax
03-11-2007, 05:33 AM
After reading all these threads on cymbal cleaning, and considering some of the conventional routes, the two that sounded most appealing if they worked were raw lemon and Lemon Pledge. So I tried it on a B8 Sabian splash first.

Since I didn't have a lemon and had the Pledge, I tried it first. It was a little cleaner but not as much as I wanted. I got a grapefruit from our backyard, sliced it in half and just worked it around the cymbal in the grooves from the bell to the edge in big circles. Then I took the cymbal to the laundry sink and used a plastic scrub brush and water to clean the cymbal really well. I dried it right away and applied the Lemon Pledge.

Results: Great, no green and not too bright. It wasn't as bright as the bottom side but it looked fine and the logo was intact.

I called myself Crashmax because when I put this new fusion kit together I wanted lots of crashes on booms, so I have 5 crashes, 2 splashes, a China and a ride, all Sabian. The reason I wanted to clean the cymbals is that I just got a B8 Pro 18" Thin Crash which is great, and it made my other cymbals look dirty.

drozzy
03-11-2007, 09:20 AM
Buckaroo Juice!

A cheap cymbal cleaner/cotton combination that you use like a car polish, wipe on, wait to dry, then scrub off. Takes a little bit of elbow grease to get that immaculate new shine back.

And it doesnt take off logos!

cantstandyourfunk
03-11-2007, 10:25 AM
Do lemons really help? Out here in Calcutta, cymbal polishes are a rarity....I'm kinda worried, and not convinced about using any citrus fruit (sic) on my new babies...

stillgroovin
03-12-2007, 06:06 PM
I will tell you this much regarding the lemon thing. I tried it and left the juice on about a minute and found that it had left a nasty stain on the surface that I had to polish out with a comercial cleaner. This possibly was operator error but just be careful.

cantstandyourfunk
03-13-2007, 08:57 AM
yeah i am not too eager on the lemon, really...it's exposing my cymbals to direct natural acid...and it's acid, anyway. Thanks a tonne for helping me make up my mind. I will not clean my cymbals till I get hold of some good cymbal polish.

Big_Philly
03-18-2007, 03:50 PM
I recently (yesterday) bought Paiste cymbal cleaner and I am pretty happy with it. It is an abrasive, combined with a detergent I think, scrapes off all the fingerprints. If anyone has seen my drumkit's thread, they will have noticed the incredibly filthy Stagg cymbal... well it shines like I just got it out of a store now. All of my cymbals that are not extremely old look a lot better now. The logo's do come off a bit but that doesn't matter much to me.

About the lemon: it's not necessarily harmful to use it, but you have to use it pretty cuickly. It is an acid, which can clean off all fat and dirt but it will also erode your cymbals if you leave it on. It's been said before in this thread but for those who are too lazy to look for it: apply the lemon juice, rub the cymbal with a damp or dry cloth, then quickly wash it off with hot water and dry them off. That should work like a charm.

Cymbal polishers are less risky though :)

cantstandyourfunk
03-19-2007, 09:34 AM
Hmmm...okay. Since no one's selling cymbal cleaners here, I might as well squeeze that citrus.

GRUNTERSDAD
03-26-2007, 03:30 PM
Well kids I just discovered the magical wonders of BarKeepers Friend yesterday and was very pleased. It does say on the label though that it contains citric acid and to be wary, so I'm sure the lemon juice would be fine.

bonzolead
03-26-2007, 03:42 PM
Well kids I just discovered the magical wonders of BarKeepers Friend yesterday and was very pleased. It does say on the label though that it contains citric acid and to be wary, so I'm sure the lemon juice would be fine.

That's all I've ever used my dad turned me on to it.that's what he uses to clean his cymbals also.just make sure you rinse the cymbals real good.

Keep Swatting,
Bonzolead

GRUNTERSDAD
03-26-2007, 11:48 PM
I did that with a sponge and a little dishwashing soap. Thanks.

macmarkus
03-30-2007, 07:23 PM
bought an used k ride some days ago ... none of the many housewife tips worked, just the paiste milk did an excellent job. i swear on it. ;)

bonzolead
03-30-2007, 08:02 PM
The trick with Bars Keepers Friend is to make a paste on your cymbals let it set for about 10-15 min. and then rince well with hot water(about as hot as you can stand).

Keep Cleaning LOL,
Bonzolead

rlestage
03-30-2007, 08:06 PM
I just got the sabian Cymbal Cleaner.

And damn! My Cymbals are like new again...I don't know if its me but the sound seems more crisp now too.

Love it!

cantstandyourfunk
04-01-2007, 10:52 AM
I did that with a sponge and a little dishwashing soap. Thanks.

Does that work? Not too harsh a soap, I'd believe..

GRUNTERSDAD
04-01-2007, 02:46 PM
I used liquid Barkeepers Friend. I put in on a paper towel and rubbed around the cymbal in the direction of the sound grooves. I then rinsed that off and used some liquid dishwashing soap to help remove any residue and rinsed again. It worked wonders.

cantstandyourfunk
04-02-2007, 12:44 PM
I don't even know what barkeeper's friend is..

GRUNTERSDAD
04-02-2007, 02:54 PM
I don't even know what barkeeper's friend is..

TRy here

www.barkeepersfriend.com

cantstandyourfunk
04-03-2007, 10:01 AM
Hey, thanks. Seems i can order online...but in any case, if I do order online, I can order a "branded" cymbal polish, yeah?
Now I am confused..

tooldrums1000
04-05-2007, 01:50 AM
Toothpaste works too. HAHA after i was done lathering my cymbals with it my hands were on fire.

drumminbro23
04-06-2007, 12:29 PM
toilet bowl cleaner and steel wool? Every one sure this isnt going to mess up the finish? Is there somthing i should put on after to keep it from oxidizing ?

punkdrummer1
04-08-2007, 02:45 AM
I was wondering if anyone knew if anything takes off those nasty white marks from the Travis Barker Signature sticks.

Tubs player
04-08-2007, 03:04 AM
using lemons works too

cantstandyourfunk
04-08-2007, 08:41 AM
all these seem a little to harsh, except for lemons...

tooldrums1000
04-12-2007, 12:44 AM
barkeepers friend works great. It really makes your cymbals look sleek.

KONA
04-12-2007, 08:40 AM
Take a look a this link:

http://www.drumdojo.com/tech/cymbal%20clean.htm

Hope it's helpful.

cantstandyourfunk
04-12-2007, 01:27 PM
Thabnks. That was a very helpful post.

hawk9290
05-05-2007, 07:58 PM
alright, here's my verdict
never use steel wool on cymbals- sure it cleans them well with the toilet bowl cleaner, but thats largely because its removing the surface of the cymbal. Only a small amount is being removed, but after a while it will affect the cymbal.

toothpaste + rust stain remover worked very well. If you get a soft buff and put it on a dremel or drill, you can really buff stuff out without damaging the cymbal other than removing the labels. Good old paper towels work too, but require some elbow grease.

BKF and similar products- good products, I find doing that plus another cleaning of toothpaste works well.

Finally, my dad runs an industrial abbrasive and polishing company and had a deal with Zildjian at one time to polish the cymbals in the factory and put on the brilliant finishes. So really, I can get them to shine like new, but it still takes some work, and we just use a soft buff on a dremel and some industrial grade metal polish- cleaned up 30 years of patina pretty nicely, but they weren't my cymbals so we didn't want to apply anything stronger.

tannerw_2010@hotmail.com
05-15-2007, 03:51 AM
go with the PAISTE CYMBAL CLEANER. i bought it for 10dollars at guitar center, and my cymbals look newer than when i got them. and the logo's dont rub off

funkoz
06-13-2007, 02:36 AM
I've got some Paiste 802's, Alphas and Rudes which I'm about to polish up with the Paiste stuff (unless anyone has any advice to the contrary!), but I've also got a pair of Zildjian New Beat hats - should I use the Paiste polish on those? Thoughts?

Thanks!

theetoie
06-24-2007, 10:48 AM
I have 3 1950's Zildjian crashe's and a Zildjian Ride (all old) The Ride i dont even know how old it is, anyway they are extremly dirty they are literaly brown, i dont want to mess up these Babies they are my prized possesions, also i have two Mica Sonic Cymbals from Germay i want to find out about them im assuming they are junk but if you know anything at all , anything email me at Theetoie@yahoo.com

ludwigvondrumcrazy
06-30-2007, 09:05 PM
I would like to preface what I am going to say about Cymbal cleaning by saying that I recondition Vintage, and some not so Vintage Drums & Outfits, 6-8 hours a day, 7 days a week and have a close relative that has owned their own cleaning business for over 25 years. Based on our experience in cleaning & polishing neither of us will use anything that contains abrasives (no matter how fine,) ammonia or acids on any metals that someone plans on having around awhile. This is due to the fact that acids & ammonia can get down into the microscopic pores of the metal and break down the alloys over time so all may appear to be fine but as time goes by bad things could start to happen. Abrasives, well, they speak for themselves.
The key phrase above is “on any metals that someone plans on having around awhile” and is what we base our “philosophy” on, longevity………………..

Cymbals, being the mysterious instruments that they are, will change character when exposed to dirt & dust, which usually gives them a mellower tone, as these build up over time they can give you the sound that you're looking for even though the Cymbal didn't "sound right" when you first added it to your Kit. The same can be said of cleaning, but here a person has to very careful. Many polishes will round off the tonal ridges and, or, alter the tonal grooves thus changing the Cymbal's tonal character, which is nothing more than how the ridges & grooves allow the vibrations to move through the metal of the Cymbal. This change is permanent I might add...............

Because of this I would urge caution when contemplating using anything other than warm soap & water or something along the lines of Groove Juice, which you always have to thoroughly rinse off after use. Many a fine Cymbal has been altered by someone that just had to get rid of the tarnish and those unsightly fingerprints. Don't get me wrong and think that I am saying that if you use a polish on a Cymbal that you will ruin it, you could in fact, based on your preference, actually improve the sound. If this is the case always keep in mind that subsequent polishing may take it beyond that "sweet sound" that you love so much..............

Always keep in mind when polishing that most, if not all, of the "black crud" showing up on your rag is actually part of the Cymbal so you are removing metal and more than likely changing how the tonal grooves & ridges allow the vibrations to work their way through the Cymbal..................

Bottom line, if you must clean, or polish, your Cymbals be very careful as you could be making changes that can't be undone by hitting the "back button," and once the metal has been removed from your Cymbal {investment,} it's gone forever..............

LVDC

Steamer
06-30-2007, 09:16 PM
A most excellent post and I totally agree on the soap and water approach regarding cymbal cleaning especially older well played ones.

RUSTE
06-30-2007, 10:12 PM
I was wondering if anyone knew if anything takes off those nasty white marks from the Travis Barker Signature sticks.

No... But i know how you feel. I had them sticks a few years ago & got white bits all over my cymbals! Using different one's now but yeah.. Thanks travis.... Nice sticks... Not!

LarryMullen3
07-08-2007, 06:45 AM
My old drum teacher said "Never Clean your Cymbals. The Dirty sound is better"

Victor_se
07-12-2007, 07:33 PM
I use Sabian Cymbal Cleaner

i'm not very happy with it.

It maybe make the dirt go away but it do it with sabian logo too! :(

Joel Woody
07-12-2007, 08:22 PM
My old drum teacher said "Never Clean your Cymbals. The Dirty sound is better"

yea.....isnt it better not to clean the cymbals?......thats what i was told too......when i get new cymbals i always put lotion on them...and then in like a week the dust just from floating around gets them dirty.....i love that sound....but thats what i do

RUBICON
07-13-2007, 04:06 AM
i just tried this a few weeks ago.... take a lemon, cut it in half, and then squeeze it and rub it around the cymbal.
then take a damp cloth and wipe the cymbal properly.... worked really well, didn't take my logos off.....
make sure to wipe the cymbal properly though....

Hi Freddie :

I just to clean my cymbals whit your formula based in lemon juice but I added bicarbonate of soda .... so you have to clean it up whit a piece of towel always in circles around the cymbal after that you have to rinse whit water or wash it whit soap .
I don´t recommend do it very offten .
Yes I know it is a weird formula ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡

Casper "DrPowerStroke" Paludan
07-14-2007, 08:14 PM
I would like to preface what I am going to say about Cymbal cleaning by saying that I recondition Vintage, and some not so Vintage Drums & Outfits, 6-8 hours a day, 7 days a week and have a close relative that has owned their own cleaning business for over 25 years. Based on our experience in cleaning & polishing neither of us will use anything that contains abrasives (no matter how fine,) ammonia or acids on any metals that someone plans on having around awhile. This is due to the fact that acids & ammonia can get down into the microscopic pores of the metal and break down the alloys over time so all may appear to be fine but as time goes by bad things could start to happen. Abrasives, well, they speak for themselves.
The key phrase above is “on any metals that someone plans on having around awhile” and is what we base our “philosophy” on, longevity………………..

Cymbals, being the mysterious instruments that they are, will change character when exposed to dirt & dust, which usually gives them a mellower tone, as these build up over time they can give you the sound that you're looking for even though the Cymbal didn't "sound right" when you first added it to your Kit. The same can be said of cleaning, but here a person has to very careful. Many polishes will round off the tonal ridges and, or, alter the tonal grooves thus changing the Cymbal's tonal character, which is nothing more than how the ridges & grooves allow the vibrations to move through the metal of the Cymbal. This change is permanent I might add...............

Because of this I would urge caution when contemplating using anything other than warm soap & water or something along the lines of Groove Juice, which you always have to thoroughly rinse off after use. Many a fine Cymbal has been altered by someone that just had to get rid of the tarnish and those unsightly fingerprints. Don't get me wrong and think that I am saying that if you use a polish on a Cymbal that you will ruin it, you could in fact, based on your preference, actually improve the sound. If this is the case always keep in mind that subsequent polishing may take it beyond that "sweet sound" that you love so much..............

Always keep in mind when polishing that most, if not all, of the "black crud" showing up on your rag is actually part of the Cymbal so you are removing metal and more than likely changing how the tonal grooves & ridges allow the vibrations to work their way through the Cymbal..................

Bottom line, if you must clean, or polish, your Cymbals be very careful as you could be making changes that can't be undone by hitting the "back button," and once the metal has been removed from your Cymbal {investment,} it's gone forever..............

LVDC

Very sobering. thank you! DPS

Victor_se
07-19-2007, 07:12 PM
go with the PAISTE CYMBAL CLEANER. i bought it for 10dollars at guitar center, and my cymbals look newer than when i got them. and the logo's dont rub off


OK

I'll try it next time

tjcara
07-20-2007, 09:17 PM
BAR KEEPERS HELPER RULES for ease of use and getting off grime. Very little elbow grease BUT you must rinse very very well and then use a cymbal protectant or you might get a hazy film

NIMBY
08-03-2007, 03:47 PM
so lemons are a good way to clean cymbals, does it get fingerprints off?

do you have to rinse it under water once finished cleaning?

just a few quick questions...

ddrummer
08-10-2007, 06:44 AM
I use Sabian Cymbal Cleaner

i'm not very happy with it.

It maybe make the dirt go away but it do it with sabian logo too! :(

i know i tryed sabian cymbol cleaner and it done the same thing they should of called it sabian cymbol logo remover

gdsm betts
08-15-2007, 08:51 PM
now most drummers cringe at the word brasso well i dont i use it on all my cymbals and they look like mirrors were told "it will take of the protective layer and cause them to crack" what a load of balls as long as u use it lightly over ur logo to insurre they dont fade away u shold have the best looking cymbals on stage =]

Batera945
08-21-2007, 05:40 PM
i just tried this a few weeks ago.... take a lemon, cut it in half, and then squeeze it and rub it around the cymbal.
then take a damp cloth and wipe the cymbal properly.... worked really well, didn't take my logos off.....
make sure to wipe the cymbal properly though....

this might be a good healthy and enviromental friendly way to do it =)

when i cleaned my cymbals for the first time a long time ago, i used the groove juice and when i was cleaning my splash i forgot to rinse it out completly and half and hour later my splash was completly burned! so that freaked me out and i dont use that one anymore. i was using the zildjian polish one but i dont feel like that cleans it that well. It doesnt really get rid of the finger prints and leaves your cymbals lookin a little bluish and dark. Im still trying to find a good cymbal cleaner. Sprays or liquids are ussually better than polish

Mr Ice Cream
08-26-2007, 07:03 AM
After reading through this thread I tried the lemons, didn't work so tried Groove Juice. It didn't take off logos. Take a look at some results. http://www.allabouticecream.com/cymbals/cymbals.htm

40 years of playing, still going strong.

SLEEPY BRiGHT EYEZ
08-26-2007, 04:11 PM
After reading through this thread I tried the lemons, didn't work so tried Groove Juice. It didn't take off logos. Take a look at some results. http://www.allabouticecream.com/cymbals/cymbals.htm

40 years of playing, still going strong.

Oooh... Those came out real nice. Is Groove Juice an abrasive? I'd like to give it a try. I had used a polish on one crash and it worked great, but reading one of the above posts has me not wanting to use an abrasive polish on a regular basis.

fijjibo
08-26-2007, 04:48 PM
After reading through this thread I tried the lemons, didn't work so tried Groove Juice. It didn't take off logos. Take a look at some results. http://www.allabouticecream.com/cymbals/cymbals.htm

40 years of playing, still going strong.

Id be heart broken if I lost all that lovely patina - but if thats what you wanted the its fine.

What cymbals are they?

They look like old A Zildjians to me

ULTIMATEDRUMMER
08-26-2007, 06:43 PM
I used to use Sabian cymbal cleaner but I didn't like it.
Now IDC I don't clean them anymore.

slingerland755
09-11-2007, 10:08 PM
BAR KEEPERS HELPER RULES for ease of use and getting off grime. Very little elbow grease BUT you must rinse very very well and then use a cymbal protectant or you might get a hazy film

It's called Bar Keepers Friend and it works like a charm. It's cheap and it will clean the dirtiest of cymbals. I know a lot of folks don't like to clean theirs, but I liked my cymbals to look good with our light show. BKF is a bit harsh, so I wouldn't use it on a prized cymbal, but if you're smacking em' everynight in front of a crowd, shiney cymbals will make the whole stage look better.

drumbandit
09-11-2007, 10:17 PM
I used to clean my cymbals a lot, I accidently cleaned my ancient Turkish ride when I was young and almost cleaned away the signature on the underside of the bell. Only in recent years have I realised what I nearly did! I think old cymbals sound much better than new, I try and get extra dust on mine now.

Tom

bonzolead
09-11-2007, 11:06 PM
Bar keepers friend is the best i've found my dad is also a drummer and he turned me on too it at a very young age(6) and i'm 37 now so I been using it for 31 yrs.i've used all the cymbal companies cleaners(zildjian,paiste,sabian,etc.)and they just don't. hold up.any kind of cleaner that has petrolium in it will leave a film on your cymbals brasso especially.like in other posts rince the cymbals very well and wipe them off using a old t-shirt or any lint-free cloth.

Keep Swatting Clean Cymbals LOL,
Bonzolead

ItalianRicky
10-04-2007, 11:10 PM
I'm very satisfied by using PAISTE cymbal cleaner.I found this lotion not aggressive against cymbals sound and look.

tomtom
10-05-2007, 12:12 AM
Simple: I don´t clean them. Wipe the dust at the most.

bonzolead
10-05-2007, 06:05 PM
I just found out "bar keepers friend" comes in a liquid I got to get some and see how it works Hopefully no powder residue and at a price of just over $3.00 I just got to try it.I've used this stuff for years and there's nothing better for cleaning cymbals the only thing is the powder residue if you don't. rinse them good enough but now that it's. in a liquid Oh happy day.

Keep Swatting Clean Cymbals,
Bonzolead

KarlCrafton
10-19-2007, 11:34 PM
I've used Wright's Copper Cream for well over 20 years, and it's been the best at keeping my cymbals clean with very little effort--and it's quick too.
I've tried a bunch of other stuff too, but Wright's works the best for me.

I have Zildjian & Sabian (and 1 Paiste 22" Formula 602) cymbals.
In 20 years, it's only taken 1 top Sabian logo off on a new 20" Vault crash...the rest of the logos on that cymbal were fine. Sabian is using a new ink, so they now recommend not going over the logos at all if you want to keep them.

I've gotten some pretty old used & crusty cymbals to look great again with Wright's.

RAWK!!!
10-20-2007, 12:16 AM
I've used Wright's Copper Cream for well over 20 years, and it's been the best at keeping my cymbals clean with very little effort--and it's quick too.
I've tried a bunch of other stuff too, but Wright's works the best for me.

I have Zildjian & Sabian (and 1 Paiste 22" Formula 602) cymbals.
In 20 years, it's only taken 1 top Sabian logo off on a new 20" Vault crash...the rest of the logos on that cymbal were fine. Sabian is using a new ink, so they now recommend not going over the logos at all if you want to keep them.

I've gotten some pretty old used & crusty cymbals to look great again with Wright's.

I use turtle wax on my zildjian planet z cymbal pack it works really well, it completely takes away finger prints, rust, and dirt from any kind of cymbal and it doesn't rip off the logo or nothing like that. I makes it shinier to.

Samf
10-23-2007, 07:11 AM
Wrights Copper Cleaner/Polish

Wipe cymbal with damp cloth and apply polish as directed. Wipe off with wet cloth turning freqently. Take dry cloth and dry and buff and you are done. No black mess, lables still there and they shine like crazy.... Very easy stuff to use and you don't need a chemical suit to apply....

Cost is $4.00 a jar and should last a couple of years. Great stuff

bonzolead
10-23-2007, 07:00 PM
I use turtle wax on my zildjian planet z cymbal pack it works really well, it completely takes away finger prints, rust, and dirt from any kind of cymbal and it doesn't rip off the logo or nothing like that. I makes it shinier to.Be careful using petrolium based products they effect the sound of cymbals.

Bonzolead

saocir
11-01-2007, 08:14 AM
hello,

has anyone try this cleaner Buckaroo Cymbal Polish (http://www.guitarcenter.com/Buckaroo-Cymbal-Polish-420377-i1133457.gc), does it takes the logos off?

KarlCrafton
11-02-2007, 07:11 PM
Wrights Copper Cleaner/Polish

Wipe cymbal with damp cloth and apply polish as directed. Wipe off with wet cloth turning freqently. Take dry cloth and dry and buff and you are done. No black mess, lables still there and they shine like crazy.... Very easy stuff to use and you don't need a chemical suit to apply....

Cost is $4.00 a jar and should last a couple of years. Great stuff

If you can clean them in a wash tub or big sink, you can do any size cymbal in less than 2 minuites, start to finish, dried off and everything without rushing.

And your cymbals will be clean, clean, clean.

Cymbalrider
11-06-2007, 12:43 AM
I tried cleaning a few cymbals at school today with the remainder of my Zildjian cymbal polish. I cleaned a few A Zildjians there although nothing much changed about their appearance. Then I cleaned the Sabian HH Orchestral suspended cymbal and now it's almost shiny again. I went ahead and cleaned a pair of HH crash cymbals but then ran out of polish before I got to the other pair. So now it's sort of a before/after deal. One pair is still brown and nasty and the other isn't. The stuff does work just not in the most efficient manner. I'm thinking of trying one of those spray kinds next. So don't be fooled about cymbal polishes not working on the other brand. The cymbals are made of the same alloy anyway except for Paiste and its b15.

turner
11-22-2007, 11:21 PM
I use crazy johns on my sabians, (aax's, hhx's pro china,)
i have used a few times and logos have not come off,
the cymbals look shinier and newer, and it takes or figermarks, stickmarks

dosnt seem to take the really tough stuff off though

Apparently it makes a mess of traditional finish cymbals so id avoid using it on those

Guy In Hat
11-25-2007, 02:17 AM
Surprisingly just a bit of CLR, water, and a stiff brush goes a long way. Only down side is it'll eventually take the logos off, but personally thats the last thing I care about when it comes to my cymbals. I've used actual cymbal polishing products and have found really no difference in the end result. It's a great inexpensive alternative to other stuff out there, I've had one bottle last for ages now.

bojangleman
11-25-2007, 05:04 AM
does that not strip the varnish off? cause i have used a rag before with just soap and water and it striped a lil off..now its tarnishing...

Surprisingly just a bit of CLR, water, and a stiff brush goes a long way. Only down side is it'll eventually take the logos off, but personally thats the last thing I care about when it comes to my cymbals. I've used actual cymbal polishing products and have found really no difference in the end result. It's a great inexpensive alternative to other stuff out there, I've had one bottle last for ages now.

Alex

justadrummer
11-25-2007, 08:37 PM
I'm another groove juice believer. If you want your cymbals to look amazing, it's THE product. I've been using it as needed for about 8 years and I haven't lost a logo yet.

I do keep a cover over my kit when I'm not playing and that seems to help. Cymbals that I'm not using live in cases. Between "cleanings" I wipe off fingerprints with a soft dry cotton rag. I buy the yellow ones at my local Home Depot or Lowe's.

I've used it on Zildjian and Paiste cymbals with great results. As for losing the "patina", I see it as losing the dirt. I have cymbals that are 2, 10, 30, 40, and 70 years old. All of them look (and sound) brand new. I think thats a good thing.

Victor_se
11-25-2007, 08:42 PM
Groove juice is a Cymbal cleaner or something for The house, cars, or What??

justadrummer
11-25-2007, 08:50 PM
It is a cymbal cleaning product. It's sold at various drum shops. It's not a cream. You spray it on, let it sit a minute or two and rinse it off. Very cool.

Big_Philly
11-26-2007, 01:02 AM
I use Sabian Cymbal Cleaner

i'm not very happy with it.

It maybe make the dirt go away but it do it with sabian logo too! :(

I hear that all the time, but the explanation for that is on the Sabian website, they say that cleaning the logo's will "eventually" erase the logo's. But apparently there's a "Logo renewal kit".
The link: http://sabian.com/english/faq/faq.cfm#cc4

Victor_se
11-26-2007, 01:19 AM
Oh! yes i know that

but the problem is, Logo remaker = more $$.... i'm a little short on budget all the time so, maybe i'll try de groove juice.

Victor_se
11-26-2007, 01:26 AM
Thanks anyway for the advise ;)

Cymbalrider
11-30-2007, 12:52 AM
Why do so many people care about the logos on the cymbals? They offer no advantage whatsoever. It's not like one day you will look around and say, "Wow, I can't remember if my cymbal is a Zildjian or Paiste" since they all have engravings anyway. Unless a cymbal company is paying you to advertise their cymbals, I do not see the point. I think writing all over cymbals look worse as years go by. Logos are just an excuse to say "look how much I paid for this" and free advertising for cymbal companies.

Joe P
12-19-2007, 04:03 AM
Just so yall know, all cymbal cleaners are acidic. That's how they work. Acidic things take off from cymbals dirt, spots, stains, and INK! There is no way you can keep a cymbal's logo from coming off, unless the cymbal companies were to make a special ink (I'm not sure if any do) that resisted the acids in cymbal cleaners.

beany_22
12-24-2007, 06:59 PM
ive tried loads of stuff to clean my cymbals...a few cleaners from the actual cymbal companys but in the end...nothing works better than Tesco's bathroom cleaner...

a little tip ;)

cleaners them perfectly and doesnt remove logos....

famousteo
01-10-2008, 07:12 AM
i used brite stuff or something like that ... that one pwnz, look for it at samash

sanzo2112
01-27-2008, 05:14 PM
The main thng about wanting to keep the logos is because if you dont have them then you wont know what cymbal goes where, well for crashes anyway,if you have 2 16" crashes and no logos how can you tell the difference?
I dont have to worry abt logos myself anyway besause of the sabian lm using,no amount of acid could take my logos off

SLEEPY BRiGHT EYEZ
01-27-2008, 08:29 PM
if you have 2 16" crashes and no logos how can you tell the difference?

Mainly by the way they sound. I have two 16" crashes, and two 20" rides all from the same brand but different series. I'm about to have a second 18" crash as well. In addition to simply hearing the difference, I can tell by the way the actual cymbal looks. The different series have different finishes.

Logos do help resale value though.

cracker
01-28-2008, 03:09 AM
Is it ok to use Brasso to clean cymbals? I have Zildian A Customs, it says good to clean brass and tin, thanks for any response

sanzo2112
01-30-2008, 12:19 AM
Iv read brasso is too abrasive and so probaly not a good product to use

drumdruid
02-25-2008, 10:00 PM
NOOOOOOO! nothing abrasive.. dont do it , many makes of cymbal have a fine laquer and this will take it off and the cymbal just looks worse afterwards.
Best tip if its only light spoiling is get in the bath.. soap and a nail brush, then if its hard stains a fine cream cleaner like for the bathroom sink .
I know some techs have been seen to use brasso and automotive polish BUT you end up having to clean more often because the surface looks dirty a lot quicker.
A good tip is too get the sweat stains and finger marks off after the gig , take a soft polishing cloth and some cleaner with you and get it done as your packing up.. saves a lot of grief later

Fett2oo5
02-26-2008, 06:26 PM
I used to clean my medals, and uniform rank brass with brasso, and it worked great!
HOWEVER, it WILL take layers of metal off. In fact because it does take off the top layer of metal was the reason we used it, it was more work to "polish" them with all the scratches and dirt on them. So we used brasso because it would take all the dirt off along with a little bit of the metal hence getting rid of any scratches you got on you uniform brass. If you don't believe me ask anyone in the military or in an ROTC.

I couldn't imagine this would be good for your cymbals, if you have a cymbal that was turned in a lathe and grooves were put into it then you would be wearing away at the tops of the grooves every time you used it. Eventually there would be no grooves in it at all.

I can give you a good example of how strong brasso is: Take a styrofoam or plastic cup small size is fine, place a few REALLY dirty pennies in it then pour some brasso in the cup. Enough to totally cover the pennies in brasso, and let this sit overnight. Then take a terri-cloth, or some small rag and rub the pennies. They should shine like they were new.

Brasso is very strong I would advise against using it on your cymbals.

KarlCrafton
02-26-2008, 06:53 PM
Just so yall know, all cymbal cleaners are acidic. That's how they work. Acidic things take off from cymbals dirt, spots, stains, and INK! There is no way you can keep a cymbal's logo from coming off, unless the cymbal companies were to make a special ink (I'm not sure if any do) that resisted the acids in cymbal cleaners.

Wright's Copper Cream doesn't take off logos, unless you want to take it off, and rub really hard.

It's formulated to clean Copper products (B20 cymbals are 80% Copper...).

I haven't had a Zildjian logo come off ever, and only 1 Sabian logo has come off (because they have changed to a new ink).

Only 1 logo on the cymbal came off of the top. The bottom logo was fine.
It was a brilliant finish Vault cymbal.
The "Sabian" part came off, but the "Vault" and cymbal size stuff was fine, and still is after 3 or 4 cleanings after the initial one.

I've never had a logo come off of a regular finish cymbal in the 20-25 years I have been using Wright's.
I've taken them off on purpose, but it hasn't made the logo go away by itself.

Victor_se
02-28-2008, 04:25 AM
Well I just Tried Groove Juice And Works really Well, I can recommend it a lot.
It Didn't took my Logo of and my cymbals now they are Clean And Shinny!

Cymbalrider
03-07-2008, 09:59 PM
I just got a bottle of Groove Juice this morning after hearing so much about it. This is the best cleaner I've ever seen. Unlike the polish stuff that really just sort of shines the cymbal and puts a greasy coating on, this stuff CLEANED the cymbal entirely. My A Zildjians are about 2 years old but now they look like they did when they were new. They actually grew lighter a shade or two. They actually feel smooth and not like they have some coating on there like the Zildjian polish did. All you do is spray it on, rub it around a bit, and rinse it back off. No mess, no ruined towels and it's fast. I guess you would have to spend longer on something really dirty though. Everyone should try a bottle of this stuff. Truly amazing.

NIMBY
03-21-2008, 01:52 PM
is the groove juice everybody raves about the ProMark brand Groove Juice?

stefanos_product
03-24-2008, 02:49 PM
how bout THOSE DAMN FINGERPRINTS? i cant find any specific answer... how am i cleaning the grease from the fingers of the guys that tested my hhx evo 18 crash at the drum shop before i buy it?? i mean anything from commercial stuff to... whatever NON corrosive (not such as HCl or NaOH). note, i live in greece so dont tell me about any barkeepers stuff cause there isnt anything like that here

DannyMeazell
03-24-2008, 03:42 PM
After reading a post several years ago I started using Brasso to clean my cymbals. I puy a bundle of soft cloth Diaper/T Shirt type rags and throw them away. I clean my complete collection about once a year. One thing to remember is to rinse the brasso off well, repeat with the Brasso if needed with new soft rag, then after you have rinsed very well, use Windex for a final cleaning. But use the original and NOT the Windex with ammonia. AMONIA NOT GOOD!!!!! Then use a low tork buffer like a small hand held car buffer. Do not let it heat up your cymbal at all! Do not buff the logo area PERIOUD! My cymbals stay shinny. Bob Dylan’s drummer, Mark Hamilton the drummer for The Dead Pyrates Sociaty, Hall of fame drum legend Linda Waring, Chant's drummer, and more well known or famous drummers than I can list, have all played my clean cymbals. One famous drummer that could afford anything in cymbals even wanted me to help him purchase a set of the hand made Turkish ones. I did! Every single drummer listed and anyone that has played my cymbals in concert say I have the finest sounding collection they have ever played, bar none, especially the hand made hand hammered ones. They consist of 3 hand made Turkish cymbals, two which are my signature series. One is a 24" Danny Meazell Dark Horse signature series raw hammered ride, a 20" Danny Meazell signature series crash and a 18" brilliant hand hammered crash. The rest is a hand or ear picked Zildjian K 16" Dark and a Cast Zildjian Z 20" crash, a n awesome 14" Zildjian A crash and 14" K Session Hats and a pair of extremely heavy remote rock Hats from Zildjian.
When all of these cymbals (Except for the un-polished Dark Horse) reflect both over head and bottom light it is spectacular.

skidney
04-13-2008, 03:07 AM
I picked up 15 more 40s-80s zils about 2 weeks ago. Generaly I would not clean vintage cymbals because i love the look but these were in a damp basement held at an angle with a lot of what I call "beertina" so I figured I would clean them all. At this point I started reading this thread. LOTS of good information but not much solid. There is some good stuff in here and some realy realy bad stuff but I think I have come up with a good solution. I went out and purchased a bunch of products just to try out on a ring cracked early 60s zil thin ride. Here are my results and what I found to be the best both for sound and for a cleaner cymbal than it was new.
Common problems:
Residue: All creams, pastes and or compounds leave a residue. There are a few problems with this. The build up of the residue in tone rings and stamps look ugly, attract more dirt keeping the metal from building up a natural patina, and has a VERY SLIGHT change in sound (talk among yourself about the extent of this). Also its just messy in general and you will go through a ton of rags.
Uneven cleaning: Liquid follows the path of the least resistance. Spray on cleaners are acid based cleaners so the longer its on one spot the more it works that spot leaving a blotching or streaking look in a lot of cases. Also if more buildup is in one area then it will take a longer time for that area to get clean meaning that it will be unevenly cleaned even if you use it over and over and over it will still never be completely even.
Poor cleaning: Different cleaners have different levels of quality of cleaning. They all clean to some point but not all of them realy get the job done to my likeing.
Discoloration: Orange cymbals, greenish cymbals, even blueish cymbals OH MY! Most of the time I see this with acid based cleaners or even acid itself (see below). Cymbals are made of compounds so thats what I would imagine the reason for this is but I realy dont know.
Too much work: While this can be an issue when you have 40-60 cymbals this does let me tell you sucks but there are tools out there to make this better.
Scuffing: I see a lot of talk of steel wool and sand paper. I buy mostly vintage stuff, I would rather clean than remove layers so this is not for me. Bronze is softer than steel so the steel wool should damage (even slightly) the cymbal. Do this if you please I am just a chicken.
Risk Vs Reward

Mothers metal polish: Worked pretty good I have used this on aluminum and other metals and it works much better on that than on bronze. It also leaves residue as rubbing compound style cleaners do. Overall it did an ok job but not realy a good reason for it.

Comet: A man, a cymbal, a tub of water, a rag, a brush, and a lot of elbow greese. It did a good job of getting rid of built up gunk but was only ok at cleaning the cymbal and was messy and annoying.

Brasso: Amazing! Cleaned the cymbals great without too much work. I did ruin a lot of rags and it left a slight residue but this is now part of my choice.

Muric acid diluted to 20%: Cleaned very well but the cymbal had a funny color and is umm acid so danger.

Groove juice: Worked realy realy fast but didnt take the heavy build up. The oder was very strong and didnt give a good deep clean. My test cymbal was quite blotchy and not cleaned evenly even after many applications using the directions to a T. This would most likely be great for very light cleaning but I wouldnt recomend it for anything serious or for years of buildup.

Acetone: This did not "clean" the cymbal but it did a great job at taking off the residue left by the other products. It did take off non patina grime off the cymbal and of course removed the logos "this is how you can remove a name from a drumhead" but didnt do a deep cleaning.

CLR: I didnt think this would work.....I was right

Windex: No cleaning other than surface grime was removed.

What I found cleans the best is not a product its a process.
What you need: Windex, Acetone, Brasso, a TON of rags, a needle (like needle and thread), and good non florecent light.

Preping your area: Brasso WILL stain your cloths,hands and floors keep this in mind. I used a scrap 3 foot by 3 foot section of carpet to do this on and of course being stupid I ruined a $100 pair of pants. Put something down down on the ground before you start its best if its something that has a texture so the cymbal dosnt move around. Put on gloves if you like (Take them off after the Brasso step as acetone eats a lot of plastics). Use Windex to clean the surface grime off of the cymbal. Use the Brasso as directed using circular motions with the grooves of the cymbal. Use a second cloth to clean the Brasso off the cymbal and a 3rd to buff the cymbal. Then wet a rag with acetone and go over the cymbal to get the small amount of residue out of the tone grooves. Take a needle to get the residue out of the stamp. At this point it will be VERY easy to get finger prints on hence the Windex. Tell me what you think. A non hand hammered cymbal top looks like a mirror. I even tried this on an Amir and a B8 pro. All of them worked out pretty well.
Tell me what you think but be nice.

GRUNTERSDAD
04-13-2008, 03:09 AM
Brasso is mostly ammonia, and the word you are looking for is PATINA.

Mushroom Cloud
04-13-2008, 03:21 AM
Lemon juice and salt is the best and easiest way to clean cymbals I've found in 25+ years of drumming.

Pour salt on the cymbal, take a large lemon quarter and sqeeze the juice on to the cymbal. Then take another large lemon wedge and wipe the the cymbal with the grooves. All the cleaning it's going to do is going to happen almost immediately. There's is no benefit from leaving it on for more than say 2-5 minutes. No elbow grease necessary.

skidney
04-13-2008, 06:44 AM
Brasso is mostly ammonia, and the word you are looking for is PATINA.

Great! I now know how to spell PATINA. I thank you soo much for this, I am quite sure that everyone had a much better day simply because of this correction. Also now we all know that you are smart. It is important to point out others spelling mistakes online because if you don't well then some other troll will. I try to add something I think may possibly help others and you just correct my spelling. Also for your information Brasso is mostly hydrogen by content if you are going to flame me please continue to leave yourself wide open. While I have a poor grasp of english you have a poor grasp on science, research, and I would imagine a poor self esteem.
PS You remove your post I remove mine or we can go back and fourth on this topic.
PPS Sorry to all else who needs to see this.

skidney
04-13-2008, 06:51 AM
Lemon juice and salt is the best and easiest way to clean cymbals I've found in 25+ years of drumming.

Pour salt on the cymbal, take a large lemon quarter and sqeeze the juice on to the cymbal. Then take another large lemon wedge and wipe the the cymbal with the grooves. All the cleaning it's going to do is going to happen almost immediately. There's is no benefit from leaving it on for more than say 2-5 minutes. No elbow grease necessary.

How does the cymbal look afterwords? Also does it age well for collectors who want to build a natural patina over time? A decent percent of my collection of drums and cymbals dont get used unfortunately. When vintage cymbals look horrible is the only time I clean them other than the one deep cleaning I let them age on display rack when I am not using them and play out with different cymbals.

Steamer
04-13-2008, 07:01 AM
How does the cymbal look afterwords? Also does it age well for collectors who want to build a natural patina over time? A decent percent of my collection of drums and cymbals dont get used unfortunately. When vintage cymbals look horrible is the only time I clean them other than the one deep cleaning I let them age on display rack when I am not using them and play out with different cymbals.

My advice as always the same on this subject just let them age and don't clean them with strong cleaners especially corrosive ones since that black stuff you see on the rag is actually part of the cymbal. All i've ever used on cymbals is soap and water and some muscle power on some tough stains and such if needed. That's it. But i'm not into shiny new looking cymbals for life and appreciate the quality and effect that comes with patina and the cymbal aging process.

Mushroom Cloud
04-13-2008, 10:33 AM
How does the cymbal look afterwords? Also does it age well for collectors who want to build a natural patina over time? A decent percent of my collection of drums and cymbals dont get used unfortunately. When vintage cymbals look horrible is the only time I clean them other than the one deep cleaning I let them age on display rack when I am not using them and play out with different cymbals.

If I were you I would test on a cymbal that you're not that attached to. For me, when I saw how fast and how well it worked I immediately went to the store and purchased more IODISED SALT and CONENTRATED LEMON JUICE and cleaned every cymbal I have. I have since found that lemon wedges and iodised salt works just as good w/less waste and run off. Protect your counter always.

As the lemon juice runs down the cymbal through the salt you can see it working before even spreading it around.

My cymbals sound better clean. I had and old Zildgian Amir that was 30 years old and it was my first real cymbal. It always had a black ring around the edge where my fingers would touch it. Nothing would get it clean. For the 1st time since I purchased it it looked like a brand new penny.

I had Paiste 2002 22" ride that actually had rust on it and used extra salt in the rusty area as a mild abrasive to remove it. Took a few times. I sold it for top dollar.

My buddy Matt J (Jeff Buckley) dropped off a 22" Zildgian riveted china at one of my gigs. The band was pissed because they said it was like giving a kid a bee bee gun, the club had no sound absorption. The cymbal said things like, " What's your problem? You're half way through the 1st verse and you haven't even hit me yet". Anyway the cymbal was very caked on gunky. The rivets were black. I cleaned it w/Lemon juice and salt 3 times and it still looks beautiful 3 years later. You can see that the rivets are brass now. I rinsed it extra well w/Dawn dishwashing soap to make sure all the salt residue was rinsed, as you should w/all cymbals.

skidney
04-14-2008, 01:04 AM
I have tried a process close to the same as you are referanceing. It seemed to work well but didnt give me a natural look. Kinda like dipping a penny in hot sauce it ended up bright but not the same color as a new penny.

GRUNTERSDAD
04-14-2008, 02:51 AM
Great! I now know how to spell PATINA. I thank you soo much for this, I am quite sure that everyone had a much better day simply because of this correction. Also now we all know that you are smart. It is important to point out others spelling mistakes online because if you don't well then some other troll will. I try to add something I think may possibly help others and you just correct my spelling. Also for your information Brasso is mostly hydrogen by content if you are going to flame me please continue to leave yourself wide open. While I have a poor grasp of english you have a poor grasp on science, research, and I would imagine a poor self esteem.
PS You remove your post I remove mine or we can go back and fourth on this topic.
PPS Sorry to all else who needs to see this.

Sure didn't mean any harm or embarrassment. Sorry you took it that way.
And my point on ammonia was directed at someone who said to be cafeful using ammonia, and since brasso has ammonia
I mentioned it. Nothing to do with trolling or self-esteem, trust me. I'm done. Welcome to the forum.

Matt-a-tat-tat
04-16-2008, 06:32 PM
i was always told that there's no need to put anything on cymbals except your breath and a good non abrasive cloth. the manufacturers put a coating on the cymbal to protect it and any cleaning goop would remove this coating. am i wrong? now older soiled cymbals i guess . . . i don't put anything on my cymbals. i wipe them down all the time. i once ruined a very nice paiste putting polish on it so i just use a cloth and maybe a little water. but i'm religious about keeping them clean.

Steamer
04-16-2008, 06:49 PM
i was always told that there's no need to put anything on cymbals except your breath and a good non abrasive cloth. the manufacturers put a coating on the cymbal to protect it and any cleaning goop would remove this coating. am i wrong? now older soiled cymbals i guess . . . i don't put anything on my cymbals. i wipe them down all the time. i once ruined a very nice paiste putting polish on it so i just use a cloth and maybe a little water. but i'm religious about keeping them clean.

Some companies spray some kind of thin film coating on their cymbals to keep them shiny longer. Paiste is well known for this. Other companies do not mostly the Turkish ones so the patina process starts up as soon as you start handling them. Let them age if shiny looking cymbals is not your main desire and again as already said a few times dish soap and water and some elbow grease and a few paper towels for me thats all if needed. Keep the corrosive cleaners that take away the patina and an actual part of the cymbal in the process away from me.

skidney
04-19-2008, 03:13 AM
i was always told that there's no need to put anything on cymbals except your breath and a good non abrasive cloth. the manufacturers put a coating on the cymbal to protect it and any cleaning goop would remove this coating. am i wrong? now older soiled cymbals i guess . . . i don't put anything on my cymbals. i wipe them down all the time. i once ruined a very nice paiste putting polish on it so i just use a cloth and maybe a little water. but i'm religious about keeping them clean.

Hello.
Some cymbals have coatings on them using a heavily acidic or abrasive cleaner can take the finish off. Some have this coating to prevent Patina so the cymbal looks new for a longer time. Some have a coating to give the cymbal a different look, like the Pastie color sounds. Cymbals with coatings of any sort should have special precautions taken while cleaning and often don’t need to be cleaned as often under normal use. I took an older Sabian I have with a protective style coating and did my normal cleaning and it looks ugly but sounds the same. If you have a cymbal with a coating on it I would recommend just work and dish or hand soap. No harsh cleaners or abrasive cleaners. Also do not use an automated buffer to clean these unless you are really experienced with them as you can buff off the finish as well.

skidney
04-19-2008, 03:53 AM
Patina can be good or bad. When it builds even and is a consistent color nothing beats the look. But when it is blotchy, inconsistent, or has green buildup on it for me it’s got to go. The most recent batch of vintage As I got had been stuck in a closet on their side laying against each other in a damp basement and had a great amount green crusty spots and just overall bad buildup. There was nothing consistent with them any natural beauty. They looked like they had been just neglected. In this case I wanted to clean them and start a natural patina even if it takes years to build it up. I think the amount of actual cymbal that removed with Brasso is less than minimal. Sometime this week I will weigh a heavy 22 or 24 inch cymbal that is 100% clean then clean it with Brasso a few times, clean the residue off with acetone and buff it very well to make sure there is no residue from anything and weigh it again. I know there is a rubbing compound section to it but I think it primarily works via chemical reaction as an anti oxidizer.
Patina= good
grime = bad

Stixxs
05-01-2008, 01:27 AM
Specifically the finish or coating that's mentioned here would that be typically on Zildjian "A" & "K" CUSTOM'S???

I'd sure like to clean a few of my K's and keep the labels foe a potential re-sale. ;-)

Kevinm
05-09-2008, 06:05 PM
With 40 plus years of being part of the cymbal cleaning dilema, think I have used about everything.
Back to Brasso, then use dish detergent with a sponge to finish the cleaning, wipe dry then I use turtle wax clear spray on wax it's called ice. Wipe it off, leaves no residue has such a fine film, you will not notice a thing, and prolongs the cymbal look.

leftsideludwig
05-22-2008, 11:57 PM
I hope this helps someone...

Soap & water, and buffing with a soft clean cloth wasn't getting rid of some fingerprints, smudges, and other light ickiness on my cymbals.

I figured I needed a stronger cleaner and a tougher cloth to scrub with, but didn't want to put scary chemicals on the cymbals or scratch the metal.

So I worked some toothpaste into the cymbal using a cymbal felt.

I'd say it did the job!! The cymbal felt is abrasive enough to get into the lathing grooves where all that dirt is hiding. But it isn't abrasive enough to scratch the metal. It's also small enough to manipulate easily and very strong so it didn't fall apart. I bet I can even still use it on a cymbal stand after it dries out.

Cymbalrider
05-27-2008, 07:44 AM
so far without the mess and fuss, the best deal is to use something like Groove Juice on a regular basis, then they will always have that natural look to them

riddle
06-19-2008, 07:07 PM
Hey Guys, i just bought my sabian b8 its not a high ranged cymbal but i was just wondering how i should get the stick marks off ma crash. I kinda hit it too hard and there are marks all over them (hihats too)
i got my cymbals just a week ago how should i clean them off without using any hard stuff? i read that polishers like brasso will ruin the whole thing and im considering paiste or sabian cymbals cleaners. Groove juice looks cool. Any suggestions? i only use a wet cloth and soap but the marks didnt wanna come off. its still shiny though.

PS: i use tama japanese oak drumsticks, thinkin of changing it to nylon tips. Thanks guys!

FunkyJazzer
06-19-2008, 08:18 PM
Well, firstly, Nylon tips are a NO GO for me. I just don't see the point of them apart from durability. Sound-wise I don't like the bright ride/hi-hat sounds. You will really struggle to get the nylon stick marks off without really scrubbing and potentially taking the finish off your cymbals.

Sabian cymbal cleaner is great, nice and mild. I used it on my old Pro Sonix cymbals, B8 chinese, and all my HHX stuff now and it's brilliant.

Lloyd.

Ironcobra
06-19-2008, 08:28 PM
I'd say don't clean them at all. That dirt that builds up on your cymbals is worth a lot, not money, but in sound properties. In 10-15 years, those B8's will sound as good as any AAX, given the right circumstances. Nylon tips are great, I love the sound it gives on the ride cymbal. I really should go back to wood tips though, haven't played any of those in over a year.