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View Full Version : Drum Shields/ acoustic foam?


remoking
04-07-2008, 03:43 AM
I'm considering buying a drum shield isolation booth. From what I can see, they cost a good amount of money for a decent shield. Does anyone have any suggestions on what brand I should buy? If so, how well does it block out sound. (I'd like to keep my budget below $750) Also, I need to buy some acoustic foam for the room that my drums are in. Anyone have any tips on this... how well does it work...is it worth the money? (from what I can see...it's VERY expensive) Any other tips on keeping my drums "quiet" so I dont annoy the neigbors too much, would be greatly appreciated.

jcsfootball
04-07-2008, 04:34 AM
The Clearsonic drum shields are pretty good. You can go to their website and they have the shields or the enclosed little room thing..not sure how much that is though. The drum shields do help with blocking sound, but unless you have some absorber panels attached to the shield, the sound will come right back at you. Not sure how much it will help with the noise reduction, it will help some, but not sure how much. I use one in my church whenever I'm not playing my electric drums, and they seem to work O.K.

Les Ismore
04-07-2008, 05:35 AM
I need to buy some acoustic foam for the room that my drums are in. Anyone have any tips on this... how well does it work...


Foam by mail, the deeper (4") the better sound absorption. At least 2-3" for drums.

http://www.foambymail.com/Wedge.html

konaboy
04-07-2008, 02:27 PM
I need to buy some acoustic foam for the room that my drums are in. Anyone have any tips on this... how well does it work...


Foam by mail, the deeper (4") the better sound absorption. At least 2-3" for drums.

http://www.foambymail.com/Wedge.html


Cool link looks just like the stuff Auralex makes.

As far as the sound shield not sure how much that will help with quieting your sound, it just gets reflected back and up instead of going forward. So the volume is still there just going in a different direction. Where are they set up now? Put your drums in the basement if possible also play with dynamics when practicing, basically learning to play controlled at a lower volume which depending on the style of music you play can be difficult. Other options would be drum mutes or mesh heads.

remoking
04-08-2008, 05:24 AM
This is true about the sound shield...but what about the absorber panels that go inside the shield? Will those have much effect on noise reduction? Cool link looks just like the stuff Auralex makes.

As far as the sound shield not sure how much that will help with quieting your sound, it just gets reflected back and up instead of going forward. So the volume is still there just going in a different direction. Where are they set up now? Put your drums in the basement if possible also play with dynamics when practicing, basically learning to play controlled at a lower volume which depending on the style of music you play can be difficult. Other options would be drum mutes or mesh heads.

The Ploughman
04-08-2008, 06:43 AM
It will never work. You are trying to contain the sound of your drums in a small room. Shield isnt the answer.

Les Ismore
04-08-2008, 12:03 PM
Cool link looks just like the stuff Auralex makes.

Yeah and compare prices with Auralex. FBM vacuum packs the foam, Auralex sends it in a box full size...crazy shipping $.

Auralex has better color, but who cares unless your charging elitists mad bank to record in your studio.

konaboy
04-08-2008, 01:53 PM
This is true about the sound shield...but what about the absorber panels that go inside the shield? Will those have much effect on noise reduction?

I'd say you are talking about minimal absorbtion at that. The shields are really not meant to quiet you down just change the direction the sound is going to keep it out of mics and such. It's not the answer to your problem.

Big_Philly
04-08-2008, 10:29 PM
The answer to your problem is to cover your walls with carpet, heavy curtains etc. The more layers, the better. Carpet stores usually have some remainders left over that you can buy for very little money so for 750 dollars you might be able to get several layers but at least a layer fully covering your room.

remoking
04-08-2008, 10:54 PM
OK.....so what do you suggest is the answer to my problem..?I'd say you are talking about minimal absorbtion at that. The shields are really not meant to quiet you down just change the direction the sound is going to keep it out of mics and such. It's not the answer to your problem.

remoking
04-08-2008, 10:56 PM
Anyone have any info on "isolation" booths? Such as the ones on clearsonic.com?

The Ploughman
04-08-2008, 11:52 PM
Two to three thousand dollars.

remoking
04-09-2008, 03:13 AM
I believe they start at around $900 on clearsonic.com? Two to three thousand dollars.

The Ploughman
04-09-2008, 01:16 PM
Only one Ive ever looked at was 1999.00 sitting on the floor at a music store. It was smaller.

konaboy
04-09-2008, 02:01 PM
Maybe it's just me from the pics but they don't look that sturdy.

First question you really need to let us know is what room are you putting these in? And on what floor, 1st floor , second floor.

While many think carpet and egg crate material will stop sound it only does so minimally what it's really doing is absorbing the reflected sound in the room making it seem more "dead" in the room but you still get allot of sound that is going out. Only way to stop sound is with dense material like drywall or sheetblock sound barrier (or something similar, sheetblock is made by auralex) and air.

Here's an excellent read http://www.acoustics101.com/basics.asp

remoking
04-09-2008, 07:07 PM
As of right now, my drums are in my pool room. It's a seperate room outside, attached to my garage. It creates an incredible amount of echo (tile floor...soon will be getting carpet put in.) There are also three windows, and a giant sliding -glass door. However, if I get an isolation booth, I will most likely be moving my drums into my house. I was hoping that maybe acoustic foam would help stop some of the echoing, as well as the carpet?Maybe it's just me from the pics but they don't look that sturdy.

First question you really need to let us know is what room are you putting these in? And on what floor, 1st floor , second floor.

While many think carpet and egg crate material will stop sound it only does so minimally what it's really doing is absorbing the reflected sound in the room making it seem more "dead" in the room but you still get allot of sound that is going out. Only way to stop sound is with dense material like drywall or sheetblock sound barrier (or something similar, sheetblock is made by auralex) and air.

Here's an excellent read http://www.acoustics101.com/basics.asp

konaboy
04-09-2008, 08:35 PM
Acoustic foam will control the echo but that's about it. It would be near impossible with the amount of windows you have to stop sound from going out. I guess for the price I'd need to see one of these ISO booths in person and test it out to see how much sound it actually contains. One thing to keep in mind with those is that the sound inside will get incredibly loud quickly even with those fabric covered panels!!

remoking
04-09-2008, 10:32 PM
Do you have any suggestions as what I should do about the windows? Maybe cover them with carpet, or the acoustic foam?Acoustic foam will control the echo but that's about it. It would be near impossible with the amount of windows you have to stop sound from going out. I guess for the price I'd need to see one of these ISO booths in person and test it out to see how much sound it actually contains. One thing to keep in mind with those is that the sound inside will get incredibly loud quickly even with those fabric covered panels!!

konaboy
04-09-2008, 11:08 PM
Do you have any suggestions as what I should do about the windows? Maybe cover them with carpet, or the acoustic foam?

Carpet won't help you with the windows again carpet only will help some with reflected sound it's not dense enough to stop sound from going through it. You need density and air to stop sound, by density I mean 5/8 drywall, mineral wool insulation (not the pink fiberglass stuff). You almost need to make a plug of sorts to put in the window opening you could use 1/2" or 3/4" plywood and some mineral wool attached to it to help reduce the amount of sound that will get out. The sliding glass door is a huge problem to solve, it's letting a ton of sound out and there is really no way to cover it. If you haven't read that link I posted you really should, it really spells out how sound control should be handled and how to approach it.