PDA

View Full Version : CB 700


Jusstickinaround
03-24-2007, 06:14 PM
Anyone remember the CB 700 drums? Someone told me that my Gretsch Catalina jazz kit is made from the same kind of mohogany that the CB's were made from. Now I use to own some CB's a long time ago and I don't recall them as sounding anywhere near as good as my Gretsch kit. If it is the same kind of mohogany maybe it has something to do with how they are made. Thanks.

thecraponline
03-24-2007, 07:39 PM
There's almost no way the CB700 and Gretsch are made from the same wood. There are actually two types of wood called mahogany (if I'm not mistaken): African mahogany, and Philippine mahogany. African mahogany is what your Gretsch is made from (I know this for a fact); it is more expensive, and much better in sound quality than Philippine mahogany. Philippine mahogany (I think it's also known as lauan, and a few other names) is what your CB700 is most likely made of. It is a wood that is commonly used in cheaper drums, and its sound quality is inferior to that of African mahogany.

Mediocrefunkybeat
03-24-2007, 09:56 PM
The Gretsch is made from the same stuff as the CB700. I'm fairly sure of it.

It's all about the build quality.

fijjibo
03-24-2007, 11:12 PM
There's almost no way the CB700 and Gretsch are made from the same wood. There are actually two types of wood called mahogany (if I'm not mistaken): African mahogany, and Philippine mahogany. African mahogany is what your Gretsch is made from (I know this for a fact); it is more expensive, and much better in sound quality than Philippine mahogany. Philippine mahogany (I think it's also known as lauan, and a few other names) is what your CB700 is most likely made of. It is a wood that is commonly used in cheaper drums, and its sound quality is inferior to that of African mahogany.

Id say your right - ive read about this before, and there are two types of mahogany.

Mediocrefunkybeat
03-25-2007, 12:24 AM
...Although I'm pretty sure African Mahogany is getting harder to come by. My guitar may be made from it, but its use in drums is now actually very limited. For instance, Pearl stopped using African Mahogany from their Export line a few years back and opted for Poplar. Generally speaking if a kit's sales hype says 'genuine mahogany' then it's Phillipine Mahogany or Luan, which is a very cheap wood, not dissimilar to Basswood. I'll repeat, I'm pretty sure the Gretsch is made from Luan and is actually just made a lot better than the CB700, which will actually make the most difference.

Add in the fact that African Mahogany is actually much darker than Luaan, and there you have it. The Gretsch kits have fairly pale interiors which would indicate Luan.

Jusstickinaround
03-25-2007, 02:31 AM
...Although I'm pretty sure African Mahogany is getting harder to come by. My guitar may be made from it, but its use in drums is now actually very limited. For instance, Pearl stopped using African Mahogany from their Export line a few years back and opted for Poplar. Generally speaking if a kit's sales hype says 'genuine mahogany' then it's Phillipine Mahogany or Luan, which is a very cheap wood, not dissimilar to Basswood. I'll repeat, I'm pretty sure the Gretsch is made from Luan and is actually just made a lot better than the CB700, which will actually make the most difference.

Add in the fact that African Mahogany is actually much darker than Luaan, and there you have it. The Gretsch kits have fairly pale interiors which would indicate Luan.

I think you may be right, but the sound from my Gretsch kit is far superior to the CB's I once owned. It's funny, but this kit sounds as good as any I've owned and I've had Fibes, Yamaha Absolutes, DW's, Premier, Sonor, and Ludwig. None of which were by any means entry level kits, it must be in the construction. After owning this kit I wonder why I blew all my money, I guess for the resale value. Then again what are the other Gretsch club kits made from? I've heard some of them and they don't seem to sound as good.

Ozzy Biz
03-25-2007, 04:01 AM
...Although I'm pretty sure African Mahogany is getting harder to come by. My guitar may be made from it, but its use in drums is now actually very limited. For instance, Pearl stopped using African Mahogany from their Export line a few years back and opted for Poplar. Generally speaking if a kit's sales hype says 'genuine mahogany' then it's Phillipine Mahogany or Luan, which is a very cheap wood, not dissimilar to Basswood. I'll repeat, I'm pretty sure the Gretsch is made from Luan and is actually just made a lot better than the CB700, which will actually make the most difference.

Add in the fact that African Mahogany is actually much darker than Luaan, and there you have it. The Gretsch kits have fairly pale interiors which would indicate Luan.

Ad think about the few kits on the market that are actually made of real african mahogany; the only that come to mind initially are the Pearl masters MHX and the limited edition Gretsch Renown Purewood kit (just like Topcat's, but not walnut). Both of these are not near the cost of the Catalina and especially the CB.
The Catalina Club kits (Rock, jazz and Mod) are all made of Phillipine Mahogany. The biggest difference between them and the CB is build quality. Great edges, well made shells, and solid construction are why your Gretsch sounds great.

crazyhorse
03-25-2007, 04:09 AM
Take the heads off and compare the bearing edges on the drums. Yes, it makes that much of a difference.

lawacker
03-25-2007, 04:56 AM
Listen to Ozzy Biz , he has the right info as far as I been reading over the last few years.

harryconway
03-25-2007, 10:41 AM
The Gretsch Renown Series states 6 ply pure 100% african mahogany shells. The Catalina Jazz shells http://www.gretschdrums.com/?fa=series&sid=531 they make no claim to origin of the so-called mahogany. The mahogany from the good old days was North and South American in origin. Now, about the only equivilant wood comes from Honduras (Central America). Hardly any of that wood is used in drum shells. Peru limits it's mahogany tree harvest to 2 trees per 1000. African mahogany http://www.exotichardwoods-africa.com/mahoganyafrican.htm at least, for the most part, is of the mahogany family. Philippine mahogany http://www.hobbithouseinc.com/personal/woodpics/mahogany,%20philippine.htm a distant cousin maybe. CB700's, purveyors of cheap drums for 40 years now. Gretsch, gotta do what ya gotta do to stay in the game. They still make great drums. And they make cheap drums too.

crazyhorse
03-25-2007, 01:36 PM
Please post a picture of the bearing edges... The wood is all well and good but you could have a nice sounding kit hiding in there somewhere.

Mediocrefunkybeat
03-25-2007, 02:29 PM
The Gretsch's bearing edges are well cut. And the shells are very well made, of that I'm sure. It just goes to show what little difference the wood *really* makes.

SLEEPY BRiGHT EYEZ
03-25-2007, 04:26 PM
My CB700 is metal. Actually in the middle of a paint job right now. I need to order some glow in the dark star stickers.

d.c.drummer
03-25-2007, 10:09 PM
Toyota Camry's and Mercedes Benz S classes are bouilt from essential the same stuff. I would still take the Mercedes.

Jusstickinaround
03-26-2007, 12:46 AM
Please post a picture of the bearing edges... The wood is all well and good but you could have a nice sounding kit hiding in there somewhere.

Here's a photo of the 14x14 bearing edge. They are 30 degree bearing edges.

Jusstickinaround
03-26-2007, 12:47 AM
Here's another of the same drum. Like I said, the kit sounds great, I agree with MFB, the wood doesn't make that much of a difference, it's the quality of the construction of the shell itself.

Jusstickinaround
03-27-2007, 03:40 AM
A few more photo's of the 14x14 floor tom.

Jusstickinaround
03-27-2007, 03:42 AM
The drums are well made as you can see in photo's.

crazyhorse
03-27-2007, 03:47 AM
Hard to really see them but this is kinda what I like in a bearing edge:

http://www.wrxhackers.com/OldDrums/BearingEdge2.jpg

It's amazing the difference in sound you get with the various cuts. On snare drums I'm a sucker for a nice snare bed as well

Class A Drummer
03-27-2007, 04:05 AM
My first set was a CB. Surprisingly not the worst set on the market, but pretty bad either way.

Deathmetalconga
03-27-2007, 05:24 AM
There's a lot of drum snobbery, people looking down and CB700. It's a surprisingly good brand for the money. Kind of like Hyundai cars: Once pieces of crap, they've come a long way and they're pretty good for the money.

I play one of the most exotic kits on the forum and I think CB700s are fine drums for beginners and are a great value. Ditto for Sunlite.

SLEEPY BRiGHT EYEZ
03-27-2007, 02:23 PM
I like my metal CB700 snare. Hopefully I'll be done with painting it this week and can show it off. As with my cheap Pulse snare, I like to tune it real tight with tight snares and I use the top layer of an old 13" Pinstripe head as an o-ring to give it that phat drum machine snare sound. I can tune it loose without the o-ring and it sounds huge.

Mediocrefunkybeat
03-27-2007, 09:44 PM
You know what's funny, Sleepy? I have my Musashi snare and I sampled it for one of my recent sequencing ventures, it actually sounded very electronic despite me putting it through only the very most basic of effects. (a little compression, subtle reverb). It was very strange, but that 13x6.5 is a sweet snare.

SLEEPY BRiGHT EYEZ
03-27-2007, 11:54 PM
It's great when you can get to the point where the end sound you want is the sound you create going in. It allows you to focus on the more creative aspects of mixing. I'm really trying to get to that point. I've been getting better since experimenting with my mics and what not. A lot of time can be lost trying to 'fix it in the mix'.

Mediocrefunkybeat
03-28-2007, 12:03 AM
Not exactly there yet, but I was using a little Sony Condenser which is actually a pretty sweet microphone. It's a jack-lead battery powered stereo model and it got my kit pretty well the other day.

abrooks4u
09-07-2010, 02:12 AM
I have had a CB set for many years... the mid 80's... Look at it this way.... GM at one time made a Chevette and a Caddy.... get my point? They are different grades of product's and if you buy the better one when it first comes out it's the best they make... if you go cheap well... My CB700 Snare is 12 Lugs.... my Concert Toms are a Composit material and my drums are I think 9 ply wood. Tune a fish... you can tune drums if you know what your doing and I've had other drummers with DW, Ludwig, Pearl and others to want to know what kind mine are cuz they sound great..... so it's really what you make out of it. Have a good one.